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DCS: P-47D-30 Discussion


Barrett_g
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In the case of the Jug I think the 9th and 12th AF used the 100/130oct while only the the 8th used the 150oct.

By the time it was in use (second half of 44) only the 56th, 78th, 353rd and 356th were still using the jugs. And only the 56th keeping them for 1945. There were 13FG in the 9th using the jug and similar number in the 12th.

I think 64hg would be appropriate as main options although 70"Hg would be a good option to simulate the 8thAF ones.

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I'm reading "Hell Hawks!" Right now. What makes this book even more impressive is reading it after reading "56th Fighter Group."

 

In "56th Fighter Group" flying a Jug below 15,000 feet was described as almost a death sentence... I started reading "Hell Hawks!" And was astonished. Here these P-47's are, flying low over the hills... far below 15k... When they got jumped by FW-190's! I thought they were done for... But they were able to not only fend them off.. But usually win, and chase off the remaining planes.

 

I think this has to do with the difference in P-47 models. The 56th FG flew P-47C's early in the war... As it was developed it fixed a lot of its shortcomings.

 

Thankfully the P-47 in DCS WWII will be the P-47D-28. The "paddle prop" was standard on this model and it's climb rate was vastly improved over the older models.

 

The 9th AF did have the luxury of staying above 15K Too busy killing everything on the ground!

 

JD

AKA_MattE

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Anyone post these yet?

 

 

 

9./JG27

 

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In the case of the Jug I think the 9th and 12th AF used the 100/130oct while only the the 8th used the 150oct.

By the time it was in use (second half of 44) only the 56th, 78th, 353rd and 356th were still using the jugs. And only the 56th keeping them for 1945. There were 13FG in the 9th using the jug and similar number in the 12th.

I think 64hg would be appropriate as main options although 70"Hg would be a good option to simulate the 8thAF ones.

 

I'm reasonably sure the P-47D powerplant was one of the few that didn't actually need 150 grade fuel to pull 72" of MAP.

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I had a dream last night.... It was really cold at 4:35 in the morning.... the last of the bombers had just took off about 30 min ago and I taxi to the end of the runway....I line up my jug with 3 500 pounders and rockets...do a really careful run-up.... then I'm rolling...rudder... careful ...keep her straight.. gear up... then the alarm went off and I HAD TO GO TO WORK:megalol:

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AFAIK that only happened with the series C engine in both the -M and -N versions.

 

I read that P&W stress tested the R-2800 up to 150 in./ 3800 horsepower on a "B" (of course using ADI but I'm pretty sure they weren't using 150 octane) and ran that same engine for 100 hours @ 3000 hp.

 

Those engines, when handled properly were quite beastly.

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I read that P&W stress tested the R-2800 up to 150 in./ 3800 horsepower on a "B" (of course using ADI but I'm pretty sure they weren't using 150 octane) and ran that same engine for 100 hours @ 3000 hp.

 

Those engines, when handled properly were quite beastly.

 

I have red about this test too but that was done on a lab. Not inside of a plane in flight. Nevertheless truly tells you about how tough the R-2800 was.

 

I red another interesting story about the toughness of the R-2800; A Jug pilot was asked by his crew chief whether he would consider having an extra boost of power at the risk of blowing up the engine. Basically the crew chief would pull the stops on the turbo off and that way the pilot would have 90-100 inches of mercury instead of the normal 52 of his Jug. Although only for about 30 second before the whole engine would blow up. The pilot (who retrospectively said he was young and stupid at that time) said, hell yes! biggrin.gif

Some missions later this Pilot (Lt Col Donal Bryan of 352nd FG) found himself in a pickle when after having shot down a 110 on the deck was bounced by 190s head on. In a normal Jug he would have been meat on the table for the FWs. But with his new settings, after the merge, he hit his extra power and was able to get to the cloud base, that that day was at 8000ft, leaving the 190s behind :pilotfly:.

Again doesn´t prove anything about safe settings for the 2800 but tells you the 2800 was anything but a weak engine.

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P-47 Thunderbolt piloted by Captain Raymond M. Walsh of the 406th Fighter Group is silhouetted against the exploding ammunition truck he just strafed, France, 23 June 1944. The image was taken by his wingman’s gun camera in the following P-47.

 

6AE202BE-9B8E-453E-A161-D6E6C66D6206_zpsid3kinhz.jpg

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That is a biiiiiiiiig boom! I think I would have soiled myself if that had gone off in front of me!

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P-47 Thunderbolt piloted by Captain Raymond M. Walsh of the 406th Fighter Group is silhouetted against the exploding ammunition truck he just strafed, France, 23 June 1944. The image was taken by his wingman’s gun camera in the following P-47.

 

6AE202BE-9B8E-453E-A161-D6E6C66D6206_zpsid3kinhz.jpg

 

What a great photo! Quoted for good measure :thumbup:

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P-47 Thunderbolt piloted by Captain Raymond M. Walsh of the 406th Fighter Group is silhouetted against the exploding ammunition truck he just strafed, France, 23 June 1944. The image was taken by his wingman’s gun camera in the following P-47.

 

6AE202BE-9B8E-453E-A161-D6E6C66D6206_zpsid3kinhz.jpg

 

 

:lol:

When you hit the wrong button on take-off

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P-47 Thunderbolt piloted by Captain Raymond M. Walsh of the 406th Fighter Group is silhouetted against the exploding ammunition truck he just strafed, France, 23 June 1944. The image was taken by his wingman’s gun camera in the following P-47.

 

6AE202BE-9B8E-453E-A161-D6E6C66D6206_zpsid3kinhz.jpg

 

Bit did he die? :pilotfly:

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Is there some sort of timeline for the P-47? It's the only plane that will pull me away from the P-51. I've been a fan since I was a kid of that fat Jug.

 

A lot of work has been done on the P-47D already, and then ED ran into an issue with a lack of aerodynamic test results, wind tunnel tests etc. So they switched to getting the Spitfire Mk.IX out for early access.

 

ED has different teams working on different things. The Normandy map is being worked on for early access too, but from my understanding, those are different teams. But from my readings, they want to have the new Damage Model (DM) completed in all the Generally Available (GA) released aircraft and the Spitfire, and all the AI models, when the Normandy map goes GA. So I imagine that is taking up much of their time.

 

In the mean time, I've read that ED discovered the aerodynamic data they were missing, or at least some of it.

 

So I'm guessing that after the Normandy map and the new DMs are GA the WWII aircraft team will go back to complete the P-47D. Maybe late summer or some time in the fall, I'm guessing.

When you hit the wrong button on take-off

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Did the P47-30 use the triple bazooka launcher M8 rockets, HVAR's, or both? How many bombs could a P47-30 carry?

 

 

On a max loadout the P47 should be able to carry both 10 hvars and 3 bombs at the same time.

 

1 500 lbs on the fuselage, and up to 1 1000 lbs bomb on the wings, with 5 HVAR per wing.

 

granted we dont have the AN-m65 1000 lbs bomb only the AN-M64 500lbs bomb so unless they add this new asset our Thunderbolt will be relying on just the An-M64 500 lbs bomb type.

 

 

GGalalt.JPG

 

 

 

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I believe it could carry a combination of at least 10 HVAR and up to 1000lbers on the wings and up to 500lbdr on centerline and or drop tanks. I have a book around here somewhere that said the Bazooka launchers were phased out somewhere around the time they switched to the D-11 from the razorback versions. from what I have been able to find, I was wondering the same thing. The Jug is probably my most anticipated module, that and the Hornet, good times are coming!

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Did the P47-30 use the triple bazooka launcher M8 rockets, HVAR's, or both? How many bombs could a P47-30 carry?

 

P47D-30 could carry only bazooka M8 rockets during WWII, first model with HVARs was D-40 and this model could carry only 4 rockets, after war P-47Ds were modified to have ability to carry 10 HVARs like N models

(btw. first N-1 model did not have that capability to carry HVARs and had to be modified to model N-2 with HVARs)

 

EDIT: but everything from that era had exception... like P-47 on photo, definitely it is model before D-30 :)

P-47D.jpg.327a899a7cbd97f9ce750046d2659d17.jpg


Edited by saburo_cz

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