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Rotor System


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Main Rotor

 

  • The main rotor consists of a hub fitted on the main gear box shaft, and five blades, each fastened to the hub with two bolts.
  • The main rotor rotates clockwise when viewed from above.
  • The main rotor is fully-articulated with flapping, feathering, and drag hinges.

  • Rotor disk diameter............21.294m (69.9ft)
  • Rotor hub diameter.............1.744m (5.7ft)
  • Weight of rotor hub............610kg (1345lb)
  • Weight of rotor blades (max):
    • all five blades...........700kg (1540lb)
    • single blade..............140kg (308lb)

    [*]Blade length...................9.775m (32.1ft)

    [*]Blade chord....................520mm (20.5in)

    [*]Max upward flap angle..........25°

    [*]Max droop angle:

    • Droop stops in............1°40’
    • Droop stops out...........4°

    [*]Max drag hinge angle:

    • leading...................13°
    • lagging...................11°

    [*]Feathering hinge angle:

    • minimum...................1°
    • maximum...................14°45'

    [*]Nominal main rotor RPM.........192

 

Tail Rotor

 

  • The tail rotor consists of a hub fitted on the flange of the tail gear box output shaft, and three blades, each fastened to the hub with two bolts.
  • The tail rotor is mounted on the left side of the tail boom and is a tractor-type.
  • The tail rotor is semi-rigid with flapping and feathering hinges.

  • Rotor disk diameter............3.908m (12.8ft)
  • Weight of rotor hub............80.8kg (178lb)
  • Weight of rotor blades:
    • all three blades..........41.55kg (91.5lb)
    • single blade..............13.85kg (30.5lb)

    [*]Blade chord....................305mm (12in)

    [*]Max flap angle.................±10°

    [*]Feathering hinge angle:

    • minimum...................-6°20’
    • maximum...................17°20’ to 23°20’

    [*]Nominal tail rotor RPM.........1120

 

Pictures/diagrams to follow...

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Really love reading that kind of things ... I wish ( and strongly believe ) Belsimtek has all available documentation to make their Mi-8 simulation as accurate as possible, and I trust them for that ;-)

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

CPL(A)IR ME/SEP/MEP/SET - CPL(H)

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Main Rotor Blades

 

Each main rotor blade consists of the following structural elements:

  • A hollow aluminum alloy spar
  • 21 tail segments with honeycomb filler, glued to each other and to the spar
  • A blade tip with an internal light
  • Ice protection elements
  • A spar damage detection system (the spar is pressurized so that if a crack is formed, the red portion of the indicator will extend and be visible during inspection)

 

Mi-8%20Main%20Rotor%20Blade.png


Edited by AlphaOneSix
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Magic...:megalol:

 

Come on, everyone knows the wires and such are just really flexible...

 

 

 

...and they unwind the twists by spinning the rotor backwards after every flight. :D

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Weta43 said:
I'd always assumed brushes ???

 

Yes! Brushes. And a slip ring. The slip ring has electrified rails, and is mounted statically (that is, it does not rotate). The brushes are attached to the rotating side, and are spring loaded to push against the slip ring rails. So the brush is always in contact with the slip ring to transfer the electricity, but at the same time the brush rotates in a circle around the slip ring. Internet searches for "brush and slip ring" will be enlightening if interested in further info. The brushes eventually wear down over time and must be replaced...but it takes a long time.

Mi-8%20Tail%20Rotor%20Slip%20Ring%20Assy


Edited by AlphaOneSix
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Swashplate

 

Some note on terminology differences from the figure and what some people may be familiar with:

 

"Plate carrier assembly" = Drive Link (sometimes called Scissors) - This clamps to the main drive shaft and is what drives the rotating portion of the swashplate

"Blade rotation pull rod" = Pitch Link or Pitch Change Rod, etc., controls pitch changes in each blade

"Plate assembly" = Swashplate, sometimes the Russians translate "swashplate" to "wobble plate". Very entertaining!

 

Mi-8%20Swashplate.png


Edited by AlphaOneSix
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That is truly amazing to know all these draws were made by hand ! And I know what I'm talking about, it was the job of my grandfather, in the precision mechanic industry.

 

A16, how did you succeed to access such things, did you worked with MiL ?

 

Really interesting, thanks for that and keep 'em flowing !

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

CPL(A)IR ME/SEP/MEP/SET - CPL(H)

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Thank you for the explanation and that vid! I love pictorials. :D It did occur to me it might be something like the brushes inside car starter, but I thought they would be unreliable and wear out in days.

ED have been taking my money since 1995. :P

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A16, how did you succeed to access such things, did you worked with MiL ?

 

I'm an Mi-17 crew chief (mechanic, loadmaster, flight engineer, door gunner, etc.).

 

I have all of the maintenance and flight documentation, as well as quite a bit of training material. The stuff I have been posting so far is from a flash-based training program.

 

I fly in an Mi-17 nearly every night. I'm in Afghanistan right now, and our two Mi-17s that I fly on and maintain are parked about 100 meters from me right now.

 

I have 6 years of experience working on and flying in Mi-17s. I've got several hours of flight time, mostly hover practice, but I also have done some pattern work. I am a private pilot (fixed wing only), but that's just a spare time hobby when I'm back home. I only have about 100 hours of flight time as a private pilot. I have almost 1,000 flight hours as an Mi-17 crew chief, with 900 of that at night using NVGs.

 

I worked on AH-64s in the U.S. Army a long time ago, but that doesn't have a lot of relevancy here. I also work on Bell 412s and a couple of other aircraft types, but I "specialize" in the Mi-17, you could say.

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I'm in Afghanistan right now, and our two Mi-17s that I fly on and maintain are parked about 100 meters from me right now.

Best regards to you and all your collegues. Have you met our Czech AF Hip pilots and staff? Say hello to them from me, too. :D They should be training Afghan AF Hip pilots somewhere in Kabul.


Edited by Suchacz
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