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Does the A10C have separate brakies on each side?


Dudester22
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I just purchased the Saitek rudder pedals and wanted to know what the real braking system was like in the A10C? I have set my pedals to have left and right brakes, but I am unsure if that is what it is really like. Does the real A10C have separate brakes for each side or when you brake does the system work as one and with one pedal? Thanks!!

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Yes, the A-10c has differential brakes. Left toe-brake is for left wheel and right toe-brake is for right.

here are some set-up tips:

Mower,

Just for you.

(But I think it will come handy to show it others too)

 

This is how I set-up my Saitek rudder:

 

 

I set the Deadzones also at the Toe-brakes So there is no input when they snap not back to absolute zero.

And I add also some at the upper end , so I don't have to press with 100% strength to get them to send 100%. - just a security measure to not overstress them by daily use.

 

If you have problems with a controller - head over here :

>>> ED Forums » English » Sim Topics » Input and Output » corrupt calibration? crazy joystick response? Use this tools Fix it:


Edited by PeterP

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The rudders are not like your bicycle handle.

 

Think like this : you put your weight to the left when pushing the left rudder - so the plane goes left.

 

wait... searching better explanation...


Edited by PeterP

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The rudders are not like your bicycle handle.

 

Actually they are. In both cases to turn left you push on the left side, on a bike it is called counter-steering. Try it next time you ride a bike, you will realise its what you've always done :)

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The rudders are not like your bicycle handle.

 

Think like this : you put your weight to the left when pushing the left rudder - so the plane goes left.

 

wait... searching better explanation...

 

I do have a lot to learn if this is for real. Why then does the joystick turn the plane right when you twist it right and use that as rudder?

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Actually they are. In both cases to turn left you push on the left side, on a bike it is called counter-steering. Try it next time you ride a bike, you will realise its what you've always done :)

 

Now I am even more confused. You wouldn't be pushing you would be pulling the handle back on the left side of the of the bike to turn left.

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At very low manoeuvring speed yes but go ride your bike at a normal speed and try it :)

 

All of this is just intuitive - aircraft designers are there to make our life easy.

 

Push left to go left and push right to go right.

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So I'll ask again to save any confusion. Does pushing the left pedal forwards turn a real plane left? Please nobody complicate the question just keep it simple. Thankyou!!

 

 

...

 

 

sorry, I didn't found a really self-explanatory pic - so I had to edit/draw it myself:

 

rudderwork_zpse319bf89.jpg


Edited by PeterP
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You're welcome! Always a pleasure to help.

 

 

Originally Posted by PeterP viewpost.gif

The rudders are not like your bicycle handle.

Actually they are. In both cases to turn left you push on the left side, on a bike it is called counter-steering. Try it next time you ride a bike, you will realise its what you've always done smile.gif

 

I hope you have much room to the sides, and you don't care to reach a given destination when you control a bicycle handle this way....;)


Edited by PeterP

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I hope you're able to accept that your comment is misguided.

 

Unlike yourself I don't post on here unless I know what I'm talking about. It's unhelpful.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering

 

OH well , you are so right! (+1 for that)

I'm so Sorry that I used the picture of a bicycle handle to tell Dudester22 that he has to use the rudders in a opposite way.

 

rudderwork_zpse319bf89.jpg

 

 

...But listen,

-we are talking here about rudders in a air-plane - and how we have to turn them - and not how to do it on bicycles that don't have to rely on the airflow to move in a certain direction... or whatever...

 

Think about apples and oranges - they make a good fruit salad together - but not always a good argument.

 

 

Originally Posted by PeterP viewpost.gif

The rudders are not like your bicycle handle.

Actually they are. In both cases to turn left you push on the left side, on a bike it is called counter-steering. Try it next time you ride a bike, you will realise its what you've always done smile.gif

 

 

..now please don't waste your time just to waste mine :).

 

 

BTW: did you know ? - at a certain Mach number you have to use the rudders in opposite way to get a wished result. ..no?! - I bet wikipedia can tell you also more about it.

 

 

...or please try again to explain how I can adapt the countersteering , you are talking about , on a plane - and than I'm fully yours...


Edited by PeterP

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BTW: did you know ? - at a certain Mach number you have to use the rudders in opposite way to get a wished result. ..no?! - I bet wikipedia can tell you also more about it.

 

Did you just have a conversation with yourself on a forum? Awesome! :thumbup:

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Did you just have a conversation with yourself on a forum? Awesome! thumbup.gif

 

no, I don't - because you listen. -thanks!

 

 

btw: I have the feeling we know each other - help me . - did we meet at this forum before June 2013?!

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Now I am confused, too. Totally.

 

First, aren't we talking here about the BRAKES? Pushing left brake slows down the left side of the a/c while the right side moves on -> turning left. Same for the other side, of course...

 

But anyhow, regarding "countersteering" ... I watched the vid and as far as I understood it, this technique only helps to "induce" the direction change as it helps the bike to lean into the desired direction - but from then on, the turn is conducted the "normal" way as you have to steer (or let the bike steer) the front wheel into the turn. If you simply would keep on pulling the handle in one direction but anticipate (and therefore lean into) the desired - other - direction ... it will hurt.

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Correct Flagrum, though using brakes to turn is not correct technique on all aircraft and will be guided by the manual.

 

You are also correct regarding countersteering. To turn a bike you countersteer to lean the bike then the front wheel tracks as required - you don't need to hold the handlebar anymore and can take your hands off. To stop turning though you need to countersteer again - a push on the right handlebar in a left turn for example, to stand the bike up and go straight.

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Now I am confused, too. Totally.

Yes, I total understand it- I'm too confused right now.

 

First, aren't we talking here about the BRAKES?
Right - but this got cleared at post #2

 

Pushing left brake slows down the left side of the a/c while the right side moves on -> turning left. Same for the other side, of course...

Wait - we never been at this point...

 

I brought up the bicycle handle after I realised that Dudester22 is using the rudders in a wrong way - and I tried to clarify it with post #10. and Dudester22 confirmed it on #11.

 

.. happy thread ending ?!

 

- NO -

 

read on....

 

 

 

But anyhow, regarding "countersteering" ... I watched the vid and as far as I understood it, this technique only helps to "induce" the direction change as it helps the bike to lean into the desired direction - but from then on, the turn is conducted the "normal" way as you have to steer (or let the bike steer) the front wheel into the turn. If you simply would keep on pulling the handle in one direction but anticipate (and therefore lean into) the desired - other - direction ... it will hurt.

This is something that OzStriker has to explain how it has something to do with controlling a air-plane and fits along with this topic

-I don't know .

But what I want to know is this:

 

I'm also very interested to get some facts on this thesis... after he turned it in a 'somewhat personal' thing and made a affront:

I hope you're able to accept that your comment is misguided.

 

Unlike yourself I don't post on here unless I know what I'm talking about. It's unhelpful.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering

 

I'm still very curious on a explanation - I wish OzStriker will this time stay on the facts.

 

 

 

 

 

...or please try again to explain how I can adapt the countersteering , you are talking about , on a plane - and than I'm fully yours...

 

'


Edited by PeterP

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Correct Flagrum, though using brakes to turn is not correct technique on all aircraft and will be guided by the manual.

Yes, the A-10C has the nose wheel steering concept to change directions on the ground. The nose wheel turns just in the direction of the side where you push the rudder pedal. So the plane reacts similar to the rudder input as if it were in flight (talking about "intuitive"). The Mustang on the other hand has no steering wheel and therefore maneuvering on the ground is done by differential braking at low speeds.

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I haven't flown the DCS P-51 but IRL the P-51 will definitely have a steerable tail wheel, it is just too much of a brute not to.

 

Tail wheel aircraft are much much trickier to taxi and require differential braking as you mentioned, but, yail wheels can normally be locked in place, have some rudder pedal connection - can be direct with cables or springs - and can be unlocked "fully castering" like a shopping trolley wheel using diff brakes and rudder so you can spin the aeroplane around on the spot.

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I haven't flown the DCS P-51 but IRL the P-51 will definitely have a steerable tail wheel, it is just too much of a brute not to.

 

Tail wheel aircraft are much much trickier to taxi and require differential braking as you mentioned, but, yail wheels can normally be locked in place, have some rudder pedal connection - can be direct with cables or springs - and can be unlocked "fully castering" like a shopping trolley wheel using diff brakes and rudder so you can spin the aeroplane around on the spot.

Thanks for explaining the world... and now explain the counter-steering you brought in- thanks in advanced! :)

 

a reminder why I ask and still demand an answer.:

 

I hope you're able to accept that your comment is misguided.

 

 

Unlike yourself I don't post on here unless I know what I'm talking about. It's unhelpful.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering

 


Edited by PeterP

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PeterP you are wrong again, you are trying to tell us that the P51 has no steering for the tail wheel. This is wrong.

 

First: you are still wrong

Second : you are still not on topic.

Third : What about my question?!

 

- where are are you going ? mind the gap!

 

 

reminder:

..now please don't waste your time just to waste mine smile.gif.


Edited by PeterP

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You keep editing your posts after I respond - just look at the editing time stamps lol.

 

Please - only say stuff that is correct, otherwise you are just giving us bad information.

 

Here is you saying the P51 has no steerable tail wheel...

 

And now it has magically disappeared!

derr.jpg.1644ff6e7924abe96e7dee370b7c0a39.jpg

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