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What would a Russian combat flight be called?


statrekmike
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So, I am making a mission and it hit me that I don't really know what one would call a flight of Ka-50's on a combat mission, I mean, for the American's it is usually something like "Hog flight" so a player might go by Hog 1-1 or something like that but I have no idea how the Russians handle that sort of thing.

 

Anyone have any ideas?

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something that ends in "ov"

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Isn't this in already? Select a Russian fighter and I think the default callsign is 102. Three digit numbers apparently. I don't know how accurate this is though, I'm not familiar with Russian callsigns.

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I am not really talking about specific aircraft call signs as much as the name of a flight itself.

 

I mean, when you refer to a entire flight in the A-10C you might say "Hog flight" as opposed to talking to a individual pilot by saying some thing like "hog 1-1".

 

Do the Russians use BORT numbers to refer to a entire flight or just a specific aircraft in that flight?

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They use bort numbers usually.

 

Not actualy. Every pilot got his own IDs, which is changing every couple weeks, 3 last digits used for communications. Like 25715, callsign 715. But between each other pilots usualy uses nicknames during flight, cuz its hard to remember all those random numbers when its getting hot.

Source - real pilot of su-25.

 

Do the Russians use BORT numbers to refer to a entire flight or just a specific aircraft in that flight?

Orders usualy goes to flight leader, like "-301, element rtb".

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"233, Naval, return to base."

 

Where 233 is the callsign to whom the communication is directed, and Naval is the callsign from whom the communication was sent. (courtesy of vergeev group)

 

AFAIK, this is how it works in most Airforces. Because lots of people are listening, first bit of information is to be the intended recipient of the call, followed by author of the call.

 

From what I understand, in Russia there is a lot more communication between tactical controllers (not on the battlefield per se) and each flight -- unlike, for example, a US flight that mainly communicates within its own flight, or perhaps other flights in a package (or other "in the field" assets such as AWACS/JSTARS, JTAC).


Edited by BBQ
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I was talking about official comms, the three digit usage is the common choice, but between pilots in a flight the nicknames are more usual.

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Yes you´r right, wrong choice using " bort", maybe i would use code number instead. It´s not the airplane number but the code number given to the pilot.

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