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G-force and blackout effects simulation


MaverickF22
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Although there are other similar threads talking about exaggerated head movement (in DCS) in the cockpit due to normal G-force effects, the primary problem remains the blackout effect which occurs way premature at a given G-force and time spent in that condition, or never occurs at all when it normally should, if the G-force is slightly lower than that of the simulated blackout.

 

For instance, a real life and normally trained pilot should be able to withstand a 9G for at least 15 seconds, without major light loss, yet there were cases when these pilots could stay for as long as 30+ seconds at 9G without having any light loss at all, so it highly depends on the training of that man in order to compete well with the high G forces without having too much trouble.

 

There are also, some older trainings (around 1997) were the pilots could stand amazingly at 12G's for 15 seconds without loosing too much vision/light, and i bet they've progressed today!

 

Here are some true facts about this:

 

 

 

 

And now the best of it:

 

 

 

 

The bad thing is that in DCS, the pilot, which is presumed to be a trained one (not a monkey) to fly a plane to it's limits, blacks out at 9G in about 5-6 seconds since reached 9G with a fast onset, but never blacks out if held at 8.0G, which is impossible!

 

 

 

Have a good day!

Mistakes, obviously, show us what needs improving. Without mistakes, how would we know what we had to work on!











Making DCS a better place for realism.

Let it be, ED!



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Well.. I went to a SAAF vets meet, and there the old guys, who were in Korea'51/2 (I think the year was) were discussing 12Gs in a P51.

As you said.. they would normally do up to 9Gs.. 12G's was the exception, and then the ground crew would give the a/c a complete overall.

 

They really appreciated our interest in their time and history.. they were actually crying with emotion.

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G-forces are a little exagerated in my opinion.A profesional pilot can sustain 9g for at least a couple of seconds + in a dogfight the adrenaline would be a big help.

I heard of an f15 pilot in the first golf war that pulled 12g for a few seconds without his vision going black one bit.


Edited by otto
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It's good that i'm not the only one around angry about this old bummer that makes DCS look very bad from how good it looks for simulation in almost all other aspects.

 

It's just annoying that ED team might be looking only for graph charts done from whatever medical evaluations which can't offer a realistic behaviour of a real, trained pilot that has flown enough times at 9G, for plenty of seconds each time, and who can say how things should happen and normally when.

 

A real (trained) fighter pilot, should stay no less than 15 seconds at 9G to be able to fly an Eagle or an F-16, or even a Flanker, cause i bet the russians also apply something similar to their pilots, and you could see that after the 80's with only the given technology, pilots were able to withstand at 9G for more than 30 seconds with no tunnel vision either.

 

In our simulator, no matter what plane you take, after no more than 3-4 seconds at 8G in a P-51 or 5..5.5 seconds at 9G's in a fighter, it really makes the driver of that plane look like he happens to be a pilot for some reason...!

 

This isn't a game in which you would play within some sort of limitation rules created on purpose, just to test your skills or to give a noob, a fictional feeling of G-force while flying a plane! It should simulate the real thing!

 

I'm just wishing for the day when they'll start to seriously talk to some F-16 or F-15 or even F-18 pilots about all these aspects regarding the minimum amounts of seconds they were able to hold 9G without having light loss, or until they've experienced a loss of consciousness, then ALSO..., how much time did it took for them to turn back on, of course they couldn't remember nor count how much they stayed in the blackout, but the recordings should also note this reaction delay.

 

Here in this video, we can also see the reaction time after getting out of the blackout..., you'll see that it didn't take more than 5 seconds for the pilot to reply to the call and instantly react (from 0:41 to 0:45 (about 5 seconds), while until 0:49 he evaluated the situation and immediately pulled), the second video's pilot stood a bit longer, so this part might be discussable, yet in our simulator, the one called pilot, remains dreaming for 13+ seconds (on chronometer) until his vision starts getting on.

 

 

 

Have a good day,

Cheers.

Mistakes, obviously, show us what needs improving. Without mistakes, how would we know what we had to work on!











Making DCS a better place for realism.

Let it be, ED!



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