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I'd like to know this too. "Code refactoring" means rewriting existing source code in order to improve its readability, reusability or structure without affecting its meaning or behaviour, but why mention it in the release notes because it's an internal process having no direct effect on end users?

 

Or do they mean something else altogether there - and if so, what? Enquiring punters want to know :)

The DCS Mi-8MTV2. The best aviational BBW experience you could ever dream of.

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I'm just happy that us BS boys get a mention on the update/fix list.

Things are looking up!

HP G2 Reverb, Windows VR setting: IPD is 64.5mm, High image quality, 90Hz refresh rate. Steam: VR SS set to 60%, motionReprojectionMode set to "motionreproduction" and Locked in at 45 Hz display,

DCS: Pixel Density 1.0, Forced IPD at 55 (perceived world size), 2 X MSAA, 0 X SSAA. My real IPD is 64.5mm. Prescription VROptition lenses installed. VR Driver system: I9-9900KS 5Ghz CPU. XI Hero motherboard and 2080ti graphics card, 32 gigs Ram 3

[code][code][code][code]
 

[/code][/code][/code][/code]200 Hz. No OC at the mo.

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Changelogs aren't necessarily just for customers :)

 

That's true, but every SW upgrade / rewrite I've ever been connected with / working on (an ex-SW engineer here) has always included more than what was mentioned in the changelog / readme, and I'm positive there's more than what meets the eye here as well. So why not document all that too if you're going to mention stuff like code refactoring anyway?

 

Well OK, there's always a question of giving away trade secrets if you delve in too deep, or at least cluttering your readmes with unnecessary and / or non-pertinent info. But still...

The DCS Mi-8MTV2. The best aviational BBW experience you could ever dream of.

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I'm a programmer by trade and we regularly re-factor our code to maintain quality. Basically when you write the code, or add a feature, then sometimes (or perhaps often) you will write the code a certain way or put in a "hack" to get it working well enough to release on time. While this may be sufficient quality for that specific release it may compromise the design moving forward. Whatever the details you then re-visit that code later and re-write / reorganise the code so that it once again fits in well with the design / quality requirements. The technique was formalised as a mitigating strategy against projects where code became so complex and fractured that they eventually had to be abandoned.

 

So in short, when I see that someone is refactoring a piece of code, that is generally a sign that the programmers take their job, and more importantly the quality, seriously.

 

Consider me very happy :)

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