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AN/APR-39


ENO
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One of my regulars over at the Firehouse posted this over in the SimHQ pages but is not able to post here because of reasons we're trying to get squared away. Anyway, he has some experience with the Huey's that were deployed in 91 into the Sandbox and remarked that this piece of equipment is a badly needed tool in the modern battlefield.

 

Him and I were talking about it in a mission last night so I thought I'd put this up here in his place.

 

 

http://simhq.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/3798026/AN_APR_39_please#Post3798026

 

Any thoughts on the matter would be great!

"ENO"

Type in anger and you will make the greatest post you will ever regret.

 

"Sweetest's" Military Aviation Art

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I get the feeling that the biggest threat to the Huey in most DCS scenarios is going to be IR-guided MANPADS and unguided AAA. The APR-39 only helps against radar threats, so while I agree it would be nice, it probably wouldn't be as helpful as suggested.

 

The version modelled in the sim predates the installation of the APR-39, I believe...or maybe it's not American...I'm not sure.

 

I love the computer voice from the APR-39, if that couldn't be modelled, then it's just not worth it in my opinion. ;)

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The APR-39 only helps against radar threats, so while I agree it would be nice, it probably wouldn't be as helpful as suggested.

 

In a package with some Ka-50 it would be very usefull on some servers.

 

This or some other features/upgrades would be nice. Then it would be easier to fly the huey without an accurate start-up procedure ;)

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The version modelled in the sim predates the installation of the APR-39, I believe...or maybe it's not American...I'm not sure.
The version of Huey we have is 1988+ because of the composite rotor blades, and NVG compatible equipment. The earliest RWR sensors installation I could find on the Huey was in mid 1970s, and the first prototype looked pretty strange too ;)

 

UH-1-20090152_zpsd87b7220.jpg

 

Although the XM130 and ALQ-144 countermeasures got to the line helicopters quicker than the RWR, I have pictures from 1978 of a ex-UH-1D with those and still no RWR blisters. Throughout 1980 most helicopters got the blisters, and many got sensors. Then in the Operation Just Cause Hueys were used in C² role - those were pretty much top of the line with all* the gismos bolted on, and that was 1989.

 

* ALQ-144 IR jammer, M130 countermeasures dispensers, NVG, "Striela kit", HF radios with scramblers, Doppler navigation and radio altimeters - only fancy things missing were INS and ECM.

 

PS. Side note: there were 17 US Army UH-1H Hueys in Panama, and they scored most missions and flight hours (both day and night) of any type used in that operation... and that was when Blackhawks and Apaches were the workhorses already.

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"If a place needs helicopters, it's probably not worth visiting." - Nick Lappos

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