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BS2 runway taxiing


Tetra
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Hi all,

 

Just wanted to ask a quick question. Been practising rolling runway taxiing and also rolling takeoffs with the black shark for a large portion of today. However one thing I have noticed is just how much rudder input seems to be required to hold a straight path down the runway.

 

My sandbox test mission is set to 0 wind on all levels and I am using the runway start setup where the shark is already powered up and sat square in the centre line of the runway. From neutral I trim forward vertically and apply collective slowly to get rolling and every single time the shark seems to want to veer to the right of the lane. Is this normal ? or is there perhaps something going on with my joystick (although it doesn't happen during flight). Also maybe stupid question but I presume there is no nose wheel steering on the shark and that it should all be done with the rudder? I attempted a rolling landing as well but the nosewheel although running straight suddenly started to rotate then snapped off.

 

Thanks for any input on this.

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I think it has to do with the gyros. If you reset your trim after making a turn, it stops what you describe. I am talking about the actual 'reset trim' function, which I map to a button. I don't use it in flight. Leaving your DT/Dh switch in the middle position while taxiing may also help.


Edited by JG14_Smil
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I found that many of my early problems with rolling on the airfield were due to not releasing the parking brake... :D

And yes... there is no nose wheel steering and you can use trim to keep the heli more aligned with the direction but put the DT/TH switch on middle as JG14_Smil said or on DH.

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Set the desired heading to the runway heading after your turn onto the runway and the autopilot channels will hold it for you.

 

Set it by tapping the trimmer.

Lyndiman

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I found that many of my early problems with rolling on the airfield were due to not releasing the parking brake... :D

And yes... there is no nose wheel steering and you can use trim to keep the heli more aligned with the direction but put the DT/TH switch on middle as JG14_Smil said or on DH.

 

Ahem... music_whistling.gif that would make two of us who forgot to release the parking brake then lol wasn't expecting it to be on when the mission is set to a runway start so never checked it lol, wasn't until you mentioned it and I brought up the input window and saw the big flashing "B" that I realized..must keep an eye on the lever behind the cyclic in future. Many Thanks!

 

Also huge thanks for everybody's input especially JG14_Smil, the middle setting on DH/DT really seems to help too, didn't know it operated in another state...guess it's back to the flight manual again for me lol.

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An interesting thing about the Shark is even though each rotor system in theory is supposed to cancel out the other's torque effect, in reality the top rotor system affects the airflow of the bottom system. In a nutshell, it means the bottom rotor needs a slightly higher angle of incidence in the blades to produce the same amount of lift. To accomplish this, the pilot applies right pedal to increase the blade pitch on the bottom and decrease the blade pitch on the top. As more power is applied, the more right pedal is required to keep the trim ball centered. This pedal input requirement of course is relatively slight and nowhere near the amount required by conventional Russian helicopters like the Mi-24 or Mi-28.

 

Having said that, I would think that the nose would veer to the left without that slight right pedal input. There might be other coaxial aerodynamic forces acting on the Shark on the ground/zero airspeed. I to have noticed the nose will veer right when beginning a rolling takeoff. It also veers to the right during an autorotation if you're not careful.

 

Maybe it has something to do with that big-a** thirty mike-mike on the right side...

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Autopilot tries to keep your heading even on the ground. Don't fight it, don't turn it off by using DH/DT switch (it might cause problems during cruise if you forget to turn it back on, set your systems on ground and concentrate on flying), know your machine and let it work for you.

 

Simply press trim button every time you change direction, just like in flight and the Shark will obey.

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