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First Post on Forum. So still figuring out how this thing works. :joystick:

 

All the UH-1 sound recordings utilized for DCS: UH-1 are authentic and taken from two Vietnam era Hueys, one located in Peru, Indiana and the second in Scottsdale, Arizona. The recording apparatus were a mixture of professional recording equipment, video cameras (to help synchronize sound), smartphones and just about anything else that was available. In many cases all the equipment was being utilized concurrently (again to synchronize sound).

 

Microphones were placed or held in the cockpit during all states of flight from startup to shutdown with other mics being placed in the ear cup of the headsets (to capture the sound as the pilot would hear it).

 

The same mixture of equipment was used externally to record everything from door panels being opened to holding a wind protected microphone (dead cat cover) within a foot or two of the engine on startup and shutdown.

 

Again externally the aircraft was recorded from varying distances from almost directly below to 100M + away laterally, in front and behind during hovering, taking off and landing. Also the aircraft made multiple passes over the recording crew at varying altitudes.

 

I think the difficult is likely in processing the varying sounds to reflect the wide range that may be exhibited by the aircraft under various conditions, modes of flight, etc. And of course finding and processing clean loops of sound that can be massaged to avoid hearing any obvious repetition. I'm sure with time other signature Huey sound bits can be pulled from the files and incorporated into updated builds.

 

Hope this helps to clarify

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I spent some time with sound modding, so I listened to a lot of sounds made by ED with professional audio hardware. I came to the conclusion that sound modding isn't necessary in any way. The p51 sounds fantastic and so does the huey. (Same for ka50 and a10c)

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

 

 

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far from synthetic. actually, a 1hr flight with headset turned all the way up, you remove the headset, you hear the humming in the quiet. really nice IMHO.

AWAITING ED NEW DAMAGE MODEL IMPLEMENTATION FOR WW2 BIRDS

 

Fat T is above, thin T is below. Long T is faster, Short T is slower. Open triangle is AWACS, closed triangle is your own sensors. Double dash is friendly, Single dash is enemy. Circle is friendly. Strobe is jammer. Strobe to dash is under 35 km. HDD is 7 times range key. Radar to 160 km, IRST to 10 km. Stay low, but never slow.

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far from synthetic. actually, a 1hr flight with headset turned all the way up, you remove the headset, you hear the humming in the quiet. really nice IMHO.

 

Haha, same. I could have sworn I heard a helicopter in the distance as I fell asleep last night. The sound is great. Really immersive.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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First Post on Forum. So still figuring out how this thing works. :joystick:

 

All the UH-1 sound recordings utilized for DCS: UH-1 are authentic and taken from two Vietnam era Hueys, one located in Peru, Indiana and the second in Scottsdale, Arizona. The recording apparatus were a mixture of professional recording equipment, video cameras (to help synchronize sound), smartphones and just about anything else that was available. In many cases all the equipment was being utilized concurrently (again to synchronize sound).

 

Microphones were placed or held in the cockpit during all states of flight from startup to shutdown with other mics being placed in the ear cup of the headsets (to capture the sound as the pilot would hear it).

 

The same mixture of equipment was used externally to record everything from door panels being opened to holding a wind protected microphone (dead cat cover) within a foot or two of the engine on startup and shutdown.

 

Again externally the aircraft was recorded from varying distances from almost directly below to 100M + away laterally, in front and behind during hovering, taking off and landing. Also the aircraft made multiple passes over the recording crew at varying altitudes.

 

I think the difficult is likely in processing the varying sounds to reflect the wide range that may be exhibited by the aircraft under various conditions, modes of flight, etc. And of course finding and processing clean loops of sound that can be massaged to avoid hearing any obvious repetition. I'm sure with time other signature Huey sound bits can be pulled from the files and incorporated into updated builds.

 

Hope this helps to clarify

 

Bookmarked to reference any time questions of sound come up. :thumbup:

- EB

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

Nothing is easy. Everything takes much longer.

The Parable of Jane's A-10

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Well you all did a cracking job, and thanks.

 

I finally migrated from flying circuits and hit the range, opened the gunners doors and wow!

Thermaltake View 91, Z390 Gigabyte Aorus Ultra, i9 9900K, Corsair H150i Pro, 32Gb Trident Z 3200, Gigabyte Aorus Extreme 2080ti, Corsair AX1200i, Warthog A-10 Hotas, MFG Crosswind pedals, TiR5 Pro, HP Reverb Pro

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Quick question: Is the initial start up sound a recording or is it just the modified jet idle sound played at a different frequency or.. pitch?, or whatever that's called. Just curious thanks!

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