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Fuel transfer rate...?


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Just curious - I've read some literature that the KC-135 can SEND fuel at a rate of up to 6000 lbs/minute. Is there any data on how fast the A-10C can receive fuel? And how is that controlled? Does the KC-135 have to set a transfer pressure/rate on their end or is it self regulating based on the receiving aircraft receptacle/plumbing?

 

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BeachAV8R

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I think the real answer, as always, is 'it depends'. I haven't timed it for DCS, but it seems to be in the ball-park of 4000-5000lbs/min.

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Cool read.

 

I wonder what an F-15/16 and the A-10 would look like with a probe??

 

one note on that article...

 

We use the Drouge method on our heavies.

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Just curious - I've read some literature that the KC-135 can SEND fuel at a rate of up to 6000 lbs/minute. Is there any data on how fast the A-10C can receive fuel? And how is that controlled? Does the KC-135 have to set a transfer pressure/rate on their end or is it self regulating based on the receiving aircraft receptacle/plumbing?

 

:joystick:

 

BeachAV8R

 

The KC-135 can send fuel to the A-10 at a rate of 2400 pph with 2 pumps operating. The KC-10 can send at a rate of 3000 pph. All "fighter" types receive fuel from tankers using a max of two pumps. The KC-10 has 6 total pumps and the -135 has 4. Both aircraft deliver fuel at a rate of 50 +/-5 psi. When pressure limits are exceeded, the receiver aircraft is disconnected from the tanker - called a "pressure disconnect." The pph rate is a function of the receiver aircraft's internal plumbing.

 

In some aircraft like the F-16 and F-22, the rate of fuel delivery can cause a pressure disconnect. When this happens, the tanker pilot performing the fuel transfer is supposed to decrease the number of pumps transferring fuel from 2 to 1 when the receiver gets back on the boom.

 

These are, of course, Real Life numbers. :)


Edited by Rhen
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Cool read.

 

I wonder what an F-15/16 and the A-10 would look like with a probe??

 

one note on that article...

 

We use the Drouge method on our heavies.

 

CARTS_02_1267828237_9073.jpg

 

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=56

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The KC-135 can send fuel to the A-10 at a rate of 2400 pph with 2 pumps operating.

 

pph? Pounds per hour? That would be damn slow. I think you mean pounds per minute.

 

Did a few test runs with the Hog and came to an average of 2489 pounds per minute.

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