Jump to content

First person view during and after ejection.


Recommended Posts

I don't know about what most people that play Lock On are like but I eject very often and when I do the imersion is gone so fast it's anticlimactic. I think first person ejections would be a nice if relatively unimportant feature.

 

I would like to see this work something like this: Upon ejection there is a noise the screen bumps up and almost instantly blacks out completely. While blacked out the exterior models load and when it fades in again it is still first person and you can look around and see the parachute above you and your legs and feet suspended over the ground. You would then have the oportunity to leave the game from this view or switch perspectives if you had external views on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It IS a good idea, but surely not an original. This has been brought up and requested many many times before. Nonetheless, I could imagine this ingame, and it sure would be much more immersive, being able to punch out, and look down at your dangling legs and the Flaming Flanker you just ejected out of fly past. Not high on the priority list though..

KuostASigcopy.png
Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting idea... but why would it blackout?

 

I believe it is common to black out from the G-forces of ejecting but I thought it would also be a way of smoothing the transition betwean internal and external cockpit view.

 

The idea has been shared at least once on the Ubi Lock On wish list it was never my intention to steal an idea from somone and I never claimed it was original I just thought it was worth shareing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

HEh it was done back in old days, in Flanker 1.0 I believe. And yes, blackout is due to G-forces, as even if you ejected in level flight, you would experience somewhere around 20 G's, even thou very briefly.... but still quite a bit more then you would normally do in a plane

The bird of Hermes is my name eating my wings to make me tame.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I believe it is common to black out from the G-forces of ejecting but I thought it would also be a way of smoothing the transition betwean internal and external cockpit view.

 

The idea has been shared at least once on the Ubi Lock On wish list it was never my intention to steal an idea from somone and I never claimed it was original I just thought it was worth shareing.

 

During ejection pilots body is processed by something about 15G, so no wonder you would blackout. Yesterday I saw programme about ejecting, from its beginings up to date.

GROM- Grupa Reagowania Operacyjno Manewrowego

Link to post
Share on other sites

No, a blackout isn't a necessity when ejecting, you see, modern ejection seats (the ones that are in lomac are counted as "modern", maybe with the exception of the mig-25 and the F-5) have relatively low G-forces when firing. The forces during an ejection mostly depend on the circumstances (altitude, speed, roll/yaw/pitch angles etc.). Also, the forces per seat are different, and the forces on catapult phase and rocket phase are different as well, with each seat having different acceleration figures.

 

For example, a K-36D seat never exceeds 22 G, but will experience a 21G load during a high altitude, high speed ejection (Mach 2.5 @ 30000 feet). But if the pilot ejects from level flight at sea level (TAS= 200-250 kts), then the G-forces may reach 12-14G (less decelleration due to the lower airspeed)

 

A zero-zero ejection from a k-36D is possible, but on the mig-29 you'll get conflicting flightpaths with the canopy, so a minimum speed of 75 km/h is required when ejecting at zero altitude. During such ejection the G-load will peak at 12, maybe 13 G (the catapult and the rocket ignition cause most of these high forces).

 

Also note that the duration of a zero-zero or low speed ejection is far less than that of a high speed, high altitude one (the time that the seat fires is around 0.5 seconds (catapult+rocket), so the high G-load will be only for .5 seconds during a zero-zero ejection.

At a high altitude high speed ejection, the forces are persisting much longer (about 3-3.8 seconds for the K-36D), but the relatively long duration of teh decelleration is very useful, as the forces are being kept low (peaks of under 21 G).

 

 

On Western ejection seats (MB Mk.10/14/16 and ACESII), the decelleration phase of the seat during high speed ejections is much shorter (about 1.2 seconds) thus resulting in MUCH higher G-loads (loads that peak at 110 G are not uncommon) while this "preformance" is useful when the plane is in a nosedive, it's very undesirable in level flight high speed ejections. That's mainly why the success rate of MB and Douglas/Escapac seats not as good as that of the k-36.

 

The almost 4 second delay in parachute deployment on the k-36 ahs been solved by adding a flight control computer, that has 150 preprogrammed ejection modes, so when let's say a su-30MKI goes in an uncontrollable 90 degree nosedive, and the crew ejects at a high speed, the K-36D 3.5 will "know" that the seats are rapidly descending, and thus deploying the main chute much faster (in order to save the pilots' lives).

 

So, all these "unknowns" have to be somehow integrated into the lomac engine, and to be honest (a year of two ago, my opinion was completely different) it's undoable.

Creedence Clearwater Revival:worthy:

Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s the thing… according to a soviet era Mig-29 pilot that I know, you don’t blackout when ejecting… at least he didn’t. I’ve assumed you don’t blackout… unless of course you’re a wimpy pilot. Force-Feedback pretty much explained it all in the above post... i guess.

LomacBanner.gif
Link to post
Share on other sites
One other thing he (Mig-29 pilot) noted. When you eject… even upside down, the seat always propels you upwards before deploying parachute. I’ve noticed that this isn’t the case in LOMAC.

 

Depends on speed, in a low speed ejection, maybe, in a high speed ejection the booms will keep the steat stable in all directions, even when ejecting sideways to the flightpath.

 

The reason the seat of the 1989 mig-29 ejection didn't stabilize was because one boom failed to deploy (you can actually see this on the video), but the parachute compensated for this malfunction and saved Kvochurs' life.

Creedence Clearwater Revival:worthy:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...