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TPOD gimball roll lock is chronic + Mav H refuses to lock on daytime high contrast tgts.


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Not liking the latest A-10CII behavior of TPOD and weapons. With pod I get chronic ,weird gimball roll lock or random crazy slew. Lets say I lock on to target at some distance with angle offset of 80 degrees between by nose heading and course to target. Got target nicely locked up, a quick shoot of laser to get slant dist. I then roll on to the target preparing to lase and weapon release. With nose almost on target, I get GIM ROLL from TPOD, and it goes crazy, slews wherever off the HUD. wrecking the shot. Just crazy effed up behavior.

MavH sucks. In day light, it will not lock on nice contrast target like a BTR or tank. I make Mav my SOI, slew reticle over target expecting nice lock. THe reticle just glides over the target, and wont lock. But on rare occasion it will lock. Unreliable. Worked well in A-10C v1 so there. In sequel not so much.

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"AGM-65H" and "worked well" are phrases that I don't believe have ever been used in a causal context on this forum.

 

Anyway, if you could record and post a track (one per problem) and/or a video, that would be most helpful.

 

"TPOD" is Hornet nomenclature for the targeting pod. The A-10 community tends to call it "TGP" instead.

 

On 6/11/2021 at 8:25 AM, DmitriKozlowsky said:

I then roll on to the target preparing to lase and weapon release. With nose almost on target, I get GIM ROLL from TPOD, and it goes crazy, slews wherever off the HUD. wrecking the shot.

 

Is this referring to a gun shot, or maybe rockets? In that case, your aiming cue should not be the TGP diamond; it should be a visual reference on the target itself.

 

If you're referring to CCRP releases and/or self-lased LGBs, I believe it's standard procedure for real pilots to create a waypoint right on the target and drop the weapon on that waypoint as SPI, for pretty much the exact same reason that you're describing here. In a CAS scenario (which would be the most common scenario for the A-10), accidentally dropping a weapon on the wrong target or on the wrong coordinates could mean a very bad day for the friendlies down there.

 

Now that doesn't mean that what you're describing is correctly simulated. But in a game you've just figured out why certain procedures exist in real life.


Edited by Yurgon
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Not saying you are not having problems but I have put nearly 100 hours now into the Tank killer. I haven't had any of those problems. Actually the Module its self has been remarkably bug free.

 

Personally I always found the Mavrick H to be really finicky even in the old A10c. I'v always prefered the D variant for that reason

 

The TGP has a limited number of "rolls" it can make from what I understand. I take that to mean whenever it is ground stabilized to a target and you preform preform a maneuver it can be as simple as the TGP getting masked in a general orbit uses up those rolls eventually locking the sensor in a gimble roll. After 3-4 attack runs. I will quickly put the TGP into standby and back into A-A to reset the gimbals and then re slave it to avoid that error.  I don't know how accurate that is but it does keep the frustration of rolling on for another attack and getting "gimble roll" at bay.  

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I think OP is talking about the TGP dead zone on the nose.  ED claims this is realistic, but I've yet to hear anyone in the know in RL pipe up and confirm this.  A simple workaround is to use INR (ground stablized mode) for the TGP, and only use POINT or AREA tracking when needed.  POINT/AREA tracking try to stabilize the TGP based on what it sees in the video image, so when the camera hits the deadzone, the tracking goes haywire.  Why it wouldn't revert to P-INR or A-INR like it does when the spot is to the rear is beyond me.  Having the TGP in INR seems to prevent this from happening, since it's locked to a point on the ground.

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I recall one mission where I had gimbal roll close to 12 times. At least half of those resulted in the pod looking off into god knows where, with a few of them coming back on target. I tried the INR trick, but even in INR it had so many issues while doing APKWS runs at night I said eff it and poped parachute flares for visual gun runs.

 

The only way I've been able to 100% avoid gimbal roll is to:

 

1. Never plan on using the pod or HUD diamond while driving straight at the target within 3nm (i.e. guns, APKWS)

2. When I see GIMBAL ROLL pop up on the TGP during a turn, I relax my bank and G until the warning disappears. Unfortunately this means I have to roll nose on target like a Cessna instead of like a fighter in some cases. 

3. Roll in with the target on the same side as my TGP.


Edited by Nealius

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16 hours ago, Nealius said:

I recall one mission where I had gimbal roll close to 12 times. At least half of those resulted in the pod looking off into god knows where, with a few of them coming back on target. I tried the INR trick, but even in INR it had so many issues while doing APKWS runs at night I said eff it and poped parachute flares for visual gun runs.

 

The only way I've been able to 100% avoid gimbal roll is to:

 

1. Never plan on using the pod or HUD diamond while driving straight at the target within 3nm (i.e. guns, APKWS)

2. When I see GIMBAL ROLL pop up on the TGP during a turn, I relax my bank and G until the warning disappears. Unfortunately this means I have to roll nose on target like a Cessna instead of like a fighter in some cases. 

3. Roll in with the target on the same side as my TGP.

 

 

My impression is that the GIMBAL ROLL warning has more to do with how fast and how far you've changed heading and bank, presumably, when the longitudinal gimbal is reaching its limit.  It does seem when it hits this limit and loses track, it sometimes comes back to the original target.  The deadzone problem is due to the lateral gimbal not quite being able to elevate to 90 degrees, so when it hits that limit, the longitudinal gimbal goes crazy trying to track it.  AFAIK, there's no warning for this, you just lose your track and it never comes back.  

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