Jump to content

Artificial Horizon drift/low suction


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

After talking with several members of the community (more knowledgeable than myself) the common consensus for the problem with the artificial horizon drifting constantly is due to low suction in the vacuum system.  After comparing this to readings on the suction gauge during flight this checks out.  The problem then becomes why is the suction consistently below operational range even while in climb power?  Is there a fix for this that I have not stumbled across, or is this a bug?

P-47 suction 2mp.png


Edited by Jakey-Poo
wording
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The vacuum-based attitude systems on these aircraft were never able to maintain a stable reference for the entire flight even when working perfectly.  Really the best a pilot could hope for was a somewhat stable horizon reference during a cloud layer penetration when absolutely necessary to land.  The expectation was the pilot would have been flying straight and level for enough time before penetration for the vacuum to provide a somewhat reliable reference during the time the pilot had no visual horizon.

 

Important to remember these fighter aircraft were only marginally IFR capable by today's standards.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Nozzle said:

The vacuum-based attitude systems on these aircraft were never able to maintain a stable reference for the entire flight even when working perfectly.  Really the best a pilot could hope for was a somewhat stable horizon reference during a cloud layer penetration when absolutely necessary to land.  The expectation was the pilot would have been flying straight and level for enough time before penetration for the vacuum to provide a somewhat reliable reference during the time the pilot had no visual horizon.

 

Important to remember these fighter aircraft were only marginally IFR capable by today's standards.

Is it normal then for the suction gauge to be consistently below the operational range, and I'm just tweaking?  I figured there was something that I was missing or operating incorrectly to have these results be the norm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

KvbAEv7.png

Looks like at least  3.8" is required to proper operation of gyro-horizon .

I also has impression that gyro-horyzons drifts a bit too quick, not only in P-47 other warbrids as well. I expect to loose gyro coordination after sudden maneuvers, but i have this problem in level flight as well.


Edited by grafspee
  • Like 1

I9 9900KF Stock, Gigabyte Z390 Aorus PRO, Ram 32 GB G.skill, Palit Gamerock OC 3090, Hotas Warthog, Thrustmaster Pendular Pedals, 4K 49" screen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oddly, I find the P-51 and Spitfire to have fairly reliable gyros. They drift after hard maneuvering, but given a few minutes of stable flight they sort themselves out. The P-47's, however, is a functioning alcoholic. Some consistency needs to be applied here.

  • Like 2

Z390 Aorus Elite | i5-9600k @5.0Ghz | RTX3060 12GB | 32GB DDR4 | Windows 10 | Quest 2 | Warthog HOTAS | Sahaj 20cm Extension

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, grafspee said:

 

Looks like at least  3.8" is required to proper operation of gyro-horizon .

I also has impression that gyro-horyzons drifts a bit too quick, not only in P-47 other warbrids as well. I expect to loose gyro coordination after sudden maneuvers, but i have this problem in level flight as well.

 

 

9 hours ago, Nealius said:

Oddly, I find the P-51 and Spitfire to have fairly reliable gyros. They drift after hard maneuvering, but given a few minutes of stable flight they sort themselves out. The P-47's, however, is a functioning alcoholic. Some consistency needs to be applied here.

 

After flying the P-51 this morning I'm getting more and more the feeling that this has to do with inadequate suction in the vacuum system in the P-47, as opposed to the gyro itself.  While in the P-51 I had no problem keeping the suction gauge within the operational range (although admittedly on the lower side), and, I would assume correspondingly, had no problem with the ADI during "normal" flight.  This is a completely different experience than the Jug.  If this is modeled accurately, and the jug had particular problems with the vacuum system, then fine.  I'm just looking for info.


Edited by Jakey-Poo
verbiage
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...