Jump to content

Twist grip/corrector usage


Recommended Posts

I'm sure this is explained somewhere, but for the life of me I can't seem to find it.

 

There is a corrector (I think that's the official name, but also referred to as a throttle) that controls the rotor RPM.

Other than making the most epic sound when spooling up during the start-up procedure do you ever use it?

 

Do you ever use it during flight, and if so, how and why?

I always put it at maximum RPM during startup, which should engage the auto-corrector, and then never touch it again.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I believe the word you are looking for is collector. This changes the angle of attack for the rotors. The throttle (twisty grip bit on a helicopter control) does the rpm and pulling up and back on the same stick (collector) changes the pitch of the blades. As I understand it throttle is usually set to a certain rpm where the system is most efficient and the collector is used to manipulate lift, the main stick is used to control the lift vector and the pedals yaw, but I will leave it to a real helicopter pilot to take it from there.


Edited by Oozler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know what the collective is, but it's not what I'm talking about.

 

The twist grip on the collective is what I'm talking about, are you supposed to change its setting during flight at all?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The twist grip on the collective controls the engines RPM and it is supposed to be left to full (100%) all the time after startup. Your engine RPM indicator should align all the time with your rotor RPM or something is wrong. On some basic helicopters like the Schweizer 300 I believe, with no correlator system, pilot needs to adjust the engine's RPM a little when pulling or pushing the collective to respectively avoid rotor's droop or overspeed. But in the case of the Mi8 and all the current DCS choppers, engine's RPM are automatically regulated as you are changing the torque with the collective.

I have seen some DCS fixed wing pilots trying to fly choppers like they were a plane by playing with the engine's power. This did not end well.


Edited by BaD CrC
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

the best analogy is cruise control in your car.

 

when you have set cruise control and no longer need to mess with the throttle.

the car will automatically add and remove throttle to maintain your speed even if you go up and down hills.

in helicopters its maintaining rotor RPM. whether you add or remove drag, by changing the pitch of the rotors, using the collective.

we would call this governed. by a engine governor.

the first governors were invented for steam engines.

the big industrial ones that provided power in mills or pumped water. that needed to run for days at a single RPM. the manual throttle is a backup in case the governor fails.

they are cool looking spinning things with weights than manually open and close the throttle based on how fast they spin.

 

naturally helicopters are a lot easier to fly with engine governors.

but they do teach pilots to fly without them, just in case the governor fails. why they have a twist grip on the collective.

but not all helicopters have a twist grip.

the gazelle does not.

the throttle is a leaver on the ceiling. if the governor fails, you set the throttle to zero and autorotate.

the huey calls it a governor and even has a switch so you can turn it off and fly old school. 

 

In the mi-8 you have two engines but only one twist grip.

so too call it a throttle would be wrong (the engines require different throttle settings to be in balance and have another level of governance to handle this).

so they call it a corrector for maintaining correct RPM.

and you only need to correct the RPM if the system for balancing the two engines output goes wrong.

 

modern engines have a FADEC (Full Authority Digital Engine Control) instead of a manual throttle and spinning thing with weights. but it all does the same thing.

acts as throttle and governor. depending on what you want.

 

 

 

  • Like 4

My Rig: i7 4930k 4.5Ghz, 16GB DDR3 2400, 2x SSD, EVGA 1080 Superclocked, Warthog Throttle and Stick, MFG Crosswinds, Oculus Rift.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 
the best analogy is cruise control in your car.
 
when you have set cruise control and no longer need to mess with the throttle.
the car will automatically add and remove throttle to maintain your speed even if you go up and down hills.
in helicopters its maintaining rotor RPM. whether you add or remove drag, by changing the pitch of the rotors, using the collective.
we would call this governed. by a engine governor.
the first governors were invented for steam engines.
the big industrial ones that provided power in mills or pumped water. that needed to run for days at a single RPM. the manual throttle is a backup in case the governor fails.
they are cool looking spinning things with weights than manually open and close the throttle based on how fast they spin.
 
naturally helicopters are a lot easier to fly with engine governors.
but they do teach pilots to fly without them, just in case the governor fails. why they have a twist grip on the collective.
but not all helicopters have a twist grip.
the gazelle does not.
the throttle is a leaver on the ceiling. if the governor fails, you set the throttle to zero and autorotate.
the huey calls it a governor and even has a switch so you can turn it off and fly old school. 
 
In the mi-8 you have two engines but only one twist grip.
so too call it a throttle would be wrong (the engines require different throttle settings to be in balance and have another level of governance to handle this).
so they call it a corrector for maintaining correct RPM.
and you only need to correct the RPM if the system for balancing the two engines output goes wrong.
 
modern engines have a FADEC (Full Authority Digital Engine Control) instead of a manual throttle and spinning thing with weights. but it all does the same thing.
acts as throttle and governor. depending on what you want.
 
 
 

Thanks for the nice easy explanation...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...