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Tried to provoke it by "winter, cloud & winds", -2C. Ran out of fuel cruising the clouds without icing.

 

Because P-47 bug, I tried P-51, Bf 109 and Spitfire. They all work as they should, ice up pitot and pitot heating clears it. So I-16? Doesn't ice using same conditions. Tried "maximum ice conditions" from "internets". Cannot ice it up. Now I wonder if it's modeled.

 

Internets says maximum icing:

https://www.weather.gov/source/zhu/ZHU_Training_Page/icing_stuff/icing/icing.htm

Quote

The likelihood of structural icing is greatest in the temperature range from 0°C to -10°C. The likelihood decreases, but is still possible between -10°C to -20°C. Research findings indicate icing is most intense near the top of stratiform clouds.

 


Edited by -0303-

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To be honest, I'm not surprised if it's not modeled. I'm not sure how accurately the engine is modeled either. I often fly full throttle during combat, happily climbing away after Bf109s and FW190s. If I pull a stunt like that in any other WWII warbird - Spitfire most of all, but P-51, P-47, Bf-109, etc. - I very quickly see the white smoke followed by a dead engine. Don't get me wrong - I LOVE the little I-16 dearly, but I'm not sure how accurately engine management has been modeled. Perhaps others have a different experience...

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20 hours ago, Doc3908 said:

To be honest, I'm not surprised if it's not modeled. I'm not sure how accurately the engine is modeled either. I often fly full throttle during combat, happily climbing away after Bf109s and FW190s. If I pull a stunt like that in any other WWII warbird - Spitfire most of all, but P-51, P-47, Bf-109, etc. - I very quickly see the white smoke followed by a dead engine. Don't get me wrong - I LOVE the little I-16 dearly, but I'm not sure how accurately engine management has been modeled. Perhaps others have a different experience...


Yes you’d expect it to have at least similar overall characteristics to the P47s radial. I agree it seems impervious to damage.

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Thank you for your comment. We intend to implement freezing soon with the release. As for engine damage, you can achieve this by over-revolution (2300 RPM regime is strictly limited in time) or by overheating or by using long afterburner. All restrictions are indicated in the quick start and will be described in more detail in the manual. I will only note that the heating and cooling model was improved in one of the recent updates.

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On 2/21/2021 at 9:23 PM, Doc3908 said:

To be honest, I'm not surprised if it's not modeled. I'm not sure how accurately the engine is modeled either. I often fly full throttle during combat, happily climbing away after Bf109s and FW190s. If I pull a stunt like that in any other WWII warbird - Spitfire most of all, but P-51, P-47, Bf-109, etc. - I very quickly see the white smoke followed by a dead engine. Don't get me wrong - I LOVE the little I-16 dearly, but I'm not sure how accurately engine management has been modeled. Perhaps others have a different experience...

Flying Russian Airplanes on 100% throttle is a hehaviour that is also present in the other WW2 simulator that shall not be named. I think there are two competing theories for that behavior. Either the Russians didn’t trust theyre pilots and severely limited how much power a Pilot could ask of it’s engine or  it comes down to more or less strict regulations in the respective Manuals.

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It's the former. The Russian designers were very conservative, and didn't trust the pilots not to wreck the engines (what with them coming from all sorts of backgrounds, many of them peasant farmers and factory workers, per the Communist ideals), so they tuned the controls so they simply couldn't be wrecked. Well, they could, but it'd take a rather long time and usually happen over several missions. It's because of this Russian WWII aircraft engines appear to be much worse performing than those from the rest of the world - they could, theoretically, produce more power, but not for long, and the planes were designed not to allow that. Between that and their robust designs, this makes them hard to damage by being hamfisted with the controls.

 

Also because of this, Lend-Lease aircraft like the Spitfire and Hurricane had a reputation for poor reliability. The Russian pilots flew them like they did their own planes - full throttle, full prop, always at max power. That made them go through engines pretty quickly. OTOH, it made the P-39, which had its engine severely underrated by manufacturer (not sure why Allison did that) turn from a bit of a dog that it was in US service into a low-altitude killing machine beloved by the VVS, especially with its kind of useless wing MGs removed.

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