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First Jug landing - dead stick...!


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Just completed my first P-47 landing... and “walked away”...

 

Main engine bearing failure at 20,000’... can’t help thinking these radials are now way too fragile!?

 

someone else was asking about glide speed - flaps down and 150 IAS seemed easy to control.  Wheels down landing in a field at about 100 and managed not to collapse the wheels!

 

Pretty sure if I tried that on a runway it wouldn’t have gone so well🤔

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How where you operating the engine when it failed (RPM, MP, and boost settings, also was fuel mixture set to auto lean or auto rich)? And how were you flying; level, climbing, or diving?

 

Landing speed is right around 90 depending on weight, so you weren’t far off on the landing speed. 
 

For some background on the engine bearings, see my recent thread here: 

 


Edited by Diesel_Thunder
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Aircraft: A-10A, A-10C, A-10C II, P-51D, F-16C, F/A-18C, F-15C, UH-1H, P-47

Modules: Super Carrier, NTTR, Persian Gulf, WWII Assets

PC: MSI 990FXA Gaming, FX-8120 3.1 GHz, 32GB Patriot Viper RAM, GTX980 4GB, 27" 1080p curved Samsung monitor, Saitek X-45 HOTAS, Opentrack

 

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Playing around with stalls and spins...  pulled the throttle back to idle with a slight nose up attitude to provoke a stall before kicking the rudder to get the plane spinning - all at about 22k.

 

Throttled up coming out of the spin and the prop seized...

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12 minutes ago, rkk01 said:

Playing around with stalls and spins...  pulled the throttle back to idle with a slight nose up attitude to provoke a stall before kicking the rudder to get the plane spinning - all at about 22k.

 

Throttled up coming out of the spin and the prop seized...

See post above. High RPM and low MP isn't good for radial engines.

 

Most likely your prop was windmilling during your spin and this caused the engine bearing failure.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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Both, pull the pitch back and keep some throttle on to make sure the prop doesn’t windmill the engine. 
 

Reducing the RPM gives you more room to pull the throttle back (reducing MP). Also following the old rule of thimb of 1” of MP for every 100 RPM helps and is easy to remember. Example is if you set RPM to 1,800, you can pull the throttle back to 18” MP. 

Aircraft: A-10A, A-10C, A-10C II, P-51D, F-16C, F/A-18C, F-15C, UH-1H, P-47

Modules: Super Carrier, NTTR, Persian Gulf, WWII Assets

PC: MSI 990FXA Gaming, FX-8120 3.1 GHz, 32GB Patriot Viper RAM, GTX980 4GB, 27" 1080p curved Samsung monitor, Saitek X-45 HOTAS, Opentrack

 

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