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More VRAM helps a lot with DCS VR performance


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1 hour ago, Lurker said:

 

Please read my post again. I'm asking why CPUs are taxed more in VR, compared to CPUs in 2d? Nowhere did I mention GPUs. 

Because the CPU need to calculate two different viewpoints for 3D


Edited by S-GERAT
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@Gunnars Driver   The stuff you mentioned are technical capabilities, they don't help if a developer chooses to use massive amounts of polygons for 3D objects and huge textures for shaders.

1 hour ago, Lurker said:

 

Please read my post again. I'm asking why CPUs are taxed more in VR, compared to CPUs in 2d? Nowhere did I mention GPUs. 

Sorry, still not answering your point!

 


Edited by imacken

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I don't get why you guys are surprised RAM does not constantly get wiped... Whether RAM or VRAM the whole point is storing accessed data for future quick access.

 

''Switching between planes causes a stutter'' And that's surprising because....? RAM is for accessing data ALREADY stored. Spawning into the same plane should be nearly instantaneous amd stutter free, though, because all that data is already loaded... because it's in RAM.

 

It doesn't need to and SHOULDN'T flush the RAM everytime something changes because then said data won't be available for recall. If you're switching between planes constantly, that will logically result in RAM filling up sooner rather than later, but because you're not ''reusing'' anything. As it fills up THEN it will start flushing, but generally RAM, regardless of type, should spend most it's time full... if you're not ''using'' it all, by definition you're wasting a resource.

 

-edit

I was in mid type when it wigged out on me and posted, which has completely disrupted my train of thought. I'm leaving off here


Edited by zhukov032186
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The troll formerly known as Zhukov

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VRAM is memory on the GPU, it's always the limiting factor for everything that get's processed and rendered to monitors by a 3D game engine. It holds the screenbuffers - all the pixels you see frame by frame and all the asset data like geometry (3D objects made of polygons) and texture data (2d bitmaps) plus certain effect processing buffers (like heat blur, screen space reflections etc.) that are needed for these frames. RAM is used for fast access for the CPU to the assets and for holding processing information (whats going on in the game). The CPU has to manage all of this, besides processing everything that is going on in the game it has also to manage loading of assets from disk to RAM to VRAM. Because on PC we still have VRAM and RAM separated (not like consoles with unified VRAM/RAM or like the Playstation 5 with GPU direct storage) a developer usually has to keep an eye on how the game uses VRAM and RAM to avoid reaching memory limits. This is part of memory management in the game's code. A dev has a certain scenario for his game in mind and he also knows what hardware combinations are out there to render the game (our machines). It looks like that ED didn't target the game engine for massive online scenarios with all available modules back in the days. It's still good for "normal" missions, you hop into one aircraft, do your mission and finish (back to main menu - VRAM gets purged). In this scenario you will barely exceed any memory limit and there is usually no need for purging unused assets during mission runtime. But online mission makers started to develop more and more open world scenarios over time, because they can, the mission editor and script engine allows it. And well, we all know that ED has to do a lot of changes and improvements on the core engine to make it fit for how we use it these days and to what actual hardware is capable of. First of all using more of our CPU cores in a more efficient way, so that excessive memory transfers do not influence CPU frametime that heavy anymore.


Edited by Alec Delorean

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