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marshal and push time and pitching deck


joojoo
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Hey to all

 

I have a few questions about the operations of supercarrier.

 

First I am a little confused about the marshal stack. For instance the approach says that the marshal stack is 26 DME this means that I have to marhal 026 or 260 of the boat? the tower gives the stack inbound or outpound in relation to the ship? is there any 10,20 or 30 degrees offset? Moreover pushing time that given is about 30-40 minutes later despite that I am the only aircraft.

 

I also want to askh how can I achieve a pitching deck? maybe from weather options??

 

Thank you

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A radial will always be "from" a station. For example R090 will be due east of a VOR/TAC. With an HSI you have 2 options, either leave 090 as the course and hold off the "from" indication or que the reciprocal (270) and hold with a "TO" indication, either way you'll be in the same spot.

 

For now the stack is always on the final bearing of mother but supposedly offsets are in the works.

 

Long push times have also been brought up in these threads. Haven't heard of any resolutions. Personally I do one turn in the hold then proceed inbound as flying circles for 20 minutes isn't why I play DCS ????

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For quickly find the Radial of 090 i use the formula -2/+2 or +2/-2, so in this case the offset will be 270. Ex: Radial 320 Offset=140.

 

Best regards,

F.

Portugal

Col. Bruno "Fonzie" F. (on DCS)

 

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"About carrier ops: The younger pilots are still quite capable of holding their heads forward against the forces. The older ones have been doing this too long and know better; sore necks make for poor sleep.'

 

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For now the stack is always on the final bearing of mother but supposedly offsets are in the works.

 

 

 

I personaly already do ( or try to ) the offset approach, you just gotta add the 30 degrees to the Final Bearing Mother Marshall give us. The only thing, opposing to you is i contact Mother around 10 nm from the DME, so i can at least practice with one turn in the holding if not if i contact here too far, it doesn't allow me enough time to settle and do a turn, most of the time she only gives me 10 minutes to settle, pretty low tim when trying to master the procedure.

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Hey to all

 

I have a few questions about the operations of supercarrier.

 

First I am a little confused about the marshal stack. For instance the approach says that the marshal stack is 26 DME this means that I have to marhal 026 or 260 of the boat? the tower gives the stack inbound or outpound in relation to the ship? is there any 10,20 or 30 degrees offset?

 

DME is the distance. 26DME means 26 miles, which according to CASE II/III Marshal procedure would be at 11,000ft: (assigned Marshal altitude) + 15 = (distance from the boat).

 

"'401' current Marshal CASE III Recovery, CV1 Approach, expect Final Bearing 115. Altimeter is 29.93. '401' Marshal Mother's 295 radial 24 DME Angels 9. Expected approach time is 53."

 

The bolded part says to hold behind the ship on the 295 radial, 24nm, 9000ft.

 

Moreover pushing time that given is about 30-40 minutes later despite that I am the only aircraft.

 

Inbound aircraft are supposed to check in 50nm from the boat. By the time you get from there to your Marshal location it's already been ~15 minutes.

 

All of this is in the manual.

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Inbound aircraft are supposed to check in 50nm from the boat. By the time you get from there to your Marshal location it's already been ~15 minutes.

 

All of this is in the manual.

Does this match with real life procedures?

 

I mean, what's the point of making the pilot fly marshal stack circles for 20 minutes, when there are no other active aircraft in the area.

 

I can imagine the value of the correct "commencing" point (distance and altitude), but why give an already exhausted aviator (after for instance a 5 hour long mission) a specific push time, when there's no one else around?

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Does this match with real life procedures?

 

I mean, what's the point of making the pilot fly marshal stack circles for 20 minutes, when there are no other active aircraft in the area.

 

I can imagine the value of the correct "commencing" point (distance and altitude), but why give an already exhausted aviator (after for instance a 5 hour long mission) a specific push time, when there's no one else around?

 

“Nobody else around” doesn’t really happen. But in the case that it did, what matters is if the deck is ready (more specifically, if the deck will be ready by the time the pilot reaches 3/4 of a mile). If the deck will be ready, no need to Marshal, and the pilot can be positively vectored and descended to the final bearing. If the deck won’t be ready, he will hold even with nobody else around.

 

Additionally, the most likely time you’ll see the situation with nobody else around is CQ (as opposed to cyclic ops). CQ requires that there is 20 minutes of “comfort time” airborne before the first landing. Thus, regulations require the pilot will hold even if nobody else around.

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“Nobody else around” doesn’t really happen. But in the case that it did, what matters is if the deck is ready (more specifically, if the deck will be ready by the time the pilot reaches 3/4 of a mile). If the deck will be ready, no need to Marshal, and the pilot can be positively vectored and descended to the final bearing. If the deck won’t be ready, he will hold even with nobody else around.

 

Additionally, the most likely time you’ll see the situation with nobody else around is CQ (as opposed to cyclic ops). CQ requires that there is 20 minutes of “comfort time” airborne before the first landing. Thus, regulations require the pilot will hold even if nobody else around.

Ok, thanks for explaining

System specs:

 

i7-8700K @stock speed - GTX 1080TI @ stock speed - AsRock Extreme4 Z370 - 32GB DDR4 @3GHz- 500GB SSD - 2TB nvme

HP Reverb G1 v2 - Saitek Pro pedals - TM Warthog HOTAS - TM F/A-18 Grip - TM Cougar HOTAS (NN-Dan mod) & (throttle standalone mod) - VIRPIL VPC Rotor TCS Plus with ALPHA-L grip - Pointctrl & aux banks <-- must have for VR users!! - Andre's SimShaker Jetpad - Fully adjustable DIY playseat - VA+VAICOM

 

~ No war today... the enemy just called in sick ~ GUMMBAH

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“Nobody else around” doesn’t really happen. But in the case that it did, what matters is if the deck is ready (more specifically, if the deck will be ready by the time the pilot reaches 3/4 of a mile). If the deck will be ready, no need to Marshal, and the pilot can be positively vectored and descended to the final bearing. If the deck won’t be ready, he will hold even with nobody else around.

 

 

 

Additionally, the most likely time you’ll see the situation with nobody else around is CQ (as opposed to cyclic ops). CQ requires that there is 20 minutes of “comfort time” airborne before the first landing. Thus, regulations require the pilot will hold even if nobody else around.

To back up GB. As an ATC either ashore or at sea, you always try to get acft on the ground as soon as possible. An empty strip bay/scope is far easier to manage than a full one. However, often delays are due to things the pilot is not immediately aware of. E. G. Weather. Obstructed deck/black runway. Ship not in wind/pitch/roll limits. Cable issues. Mullets refusing to give green deck. Other traffic. Traffic with higher priority. The list goes on.

 

Any half decent ATC will inform the pilot the reason for any delay but it is not always possible... And I can imagine would be a challenge to code into dcs. A simple number x in the sequence would be nice though.

 

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