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For the sake of realism


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If this simulator wants to be "realistic", then:

 

 

1. Make the angle of view/perspective from the cockpit the same as of the human eye, current perspective is too wide, targets look more distant than they really are, and when landing, it looks that I am closer to the ground than I really am;

 

 

2. Human eye can't zoom in and out.

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1. Make the angle of view/perspective from the cockpit the same as of the human eye, current perspective is too wide, targets look more distant than they really are, and when landing, it looks that I am closer to the ground than I really am;

 

The FOV can be adjusted by editing the Server.lua file (using Notepad++ or similar)

 

2. Human eye can't zoom in and out.

Then just don’t use the zoom keys or axes, leave them for those with poorer eyesight.
Edited by Rudel_chw

 

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I know it will sound rude when I say this, but you really have no idea what you're talking about.

 

There is no ''one true FoV to rule them all'', each monitor is apt to be a different size, remember 17'' all the way to 110'' monsters, it would be different for each one.

 

The ''zoom'' IS field of view. Adjust it to whatever you like, then save it as the default. Alternatively, you can edit the LUA as Rudel suggested. Adjustable FoV is a NECESSITY due to aforementioned ''each monitor is different''. That's why, wait for it.... EVERY SIM EVER HAS HAD IT.

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1.) You can approximate the FOV but you just can't account for the eye and brain capabilities of instant focus, movement detection, peripheral vision etc. Just set what feels right for you.

 

2.) Which is why combat pilots have carried binoculars since WW1.

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If this simulator wants to be "realistic", then:

 

 

1. Make the angle of view/perspective from the cockpit the same as of the human eye, current perspective is too wide, targets look more distant than they really are, and when landing, it looks that I am closer to the ground than I really am;

 

 

2. Human eye can't zoom in and out.

 

For the sake of realism: This isn't reality, it's a simulator. While flying DCS you are deprived of several very crucial elements that reality affords you and will never exist in DCS because of it's (and all software) nature. You cannot feel anything. The sensations of the aircraft movement and it's reaction to the environment are completely missing. It makes flying more challenging as you only have visual ques to respond to. Much more important than that in my book is the lack of visual ability as a whole. You really have no peripheral vision, and depth perception is skewed. Again.......far from reality. For me, the way things are modeled in DCS do a very good job of making up for the lack of many other physical sensations. Again....It's not real. It's a cartoon version of a simulated environment. I think that this is about as real as you're apt to get in a simulator like this. Call me crazy but I've been flying simulators for over 20 years and they have yet to be anything like reality.

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If this simulator wants to be "realistic", then:

 

 

1. Make the angle of view/perspective from the cockpit the same as of the human eye, current perspective is too wide, targets look more distant than they really are, and when landing, it looks that I am closer to the ground than I really am;

 

 

2. Human eye can't zoom in and out.

 

It is very hard to hit right spot.

I started my DCS adventure at 21" 1080p screen then i switched to 1440p 32" then i switched to 4k 42" screen.

Every change required from me to change my view settings, with 42" 4k monitor i am able to increase FOV without suffering the detail level, i don't need to zoom in very often now.

Where at 21" 1080 if i wanted to see large FOV i was loosing a lot of detail so i had to use zoom in to see stuff. Sometimes when i had nice FOV set up i could not read gauges in my cockpit, gauges were so small that i had zoom it to read them.


Edited by grafspee

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If this simulator wants to be "realistic", then:

1. Make the angle of view/perspective from the cockpit the same as of the human eye, current perspective is too wide, targets look more distant than they really are, and when landing, it looks that I am closer to the ground than I really am;

 

 

You can set this yourself already...

 

 

 

2. Human eye can't zoom in and out.

 

 

Don't use the zoom then.. . and buy a full wrap around 1:1 screen/ display that that what you look at is exactly the same size and angle as a real life view.

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Don't use the zoom then.. . and buy a full wrap around 1:1 screen/ display that that what you look at is exactly the same size and angle as a real life view.

 

Even this may not provide quality which he wants. It still will be just flat screen curved but still not 3D.

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2. Human eye can't zoom in and out.

Step 1: Close 1 eye

Step 2: Put object(finger, pen, dildo, etc) between you and monitor or any background for that matter.

Step 3(The important part): Focus on object; if background is blurry your eye is working fine if not consult doctor.

Step 4: Enjoy DCS


Edited by PhantomCat
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Setting the default field of view for the cockpit F1 view to be the same as in the F2 view would have been just fine. I find the enemy aircraft looking at F2 view, and when I switch to F1 view, it is gone, because the field of view is much more wide.

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Setting the default field of view for the cockpit F1 view to be the same as in the F2 view would have been just fine. I find the enemy aircraft looking at F2 view, and when I switch to F1 view, it is gone, because the field of view is much more wide.

 

Oh this is drawing distance here involved.

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The FOV can be adjusted by editing the Server.lua file (using Notepad++ or similar)

Can you give me some advice on how to set the camera angle in the F1 view to be the same as in the F2 view? I find the camera angle in the F2 view to look natural. I want to be switching between the F1 and F2 view during a dogfight and have the same perspective. Server.lua file has got lots of different parameters, and I don't feel competent nor confident to be changing anything there.

 

Then just don’t use the zoom keys or axes, leave them for those with poorer eyesight.

I mentioned zooming in and out because I saw on You Tube people are doing that in order to track enemy aircraft. I could zoom in a bit to try to match the F1 view to be similar as the F2 view, but it feels kind of shitty thing to do, because that way I can't match them to be exactly the same.

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I know it will sound rude when I say this, but you really have no idea what you're talking about.

 

There is no ''one true FoV to rule them all'', each monitor is apt to be a different size, remember 17'' all the way to 110'' monsters, it would be different for each one.

 

The ''zoom'' IS field of view. Adjust it to whatever you like, then save it as the default. Alternatively, you can edit the LUA as Rudel suggested. Adjustable FoV is a NECESSITY due to aforementioned ''each monitor is different''. That's why, wait for it.... EVERY SIM EVER HAS HAD IT.

From my experience, larger monitor just makes objects appear larger and gives better details. I used Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator 3 on a smaller 1366 x 768 monitor and on a larger 1920 x 1200 monitor, and the larger one with better resolution didn't change the camera angle, it just made objects appear larger on the screen and gave me better details.

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From my experience, larger monitor just makes objects appear larger and gives better details. I used Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator 3 on a smaller 1366 x 768 monitor and on a larger 1920 x 1200 monitor, and the larger one with better resolution didn't change the camera angle, it just made objects appear larger on the screen and gave me better details.

 

Ofc it wont change FOV, FOV is game setting so no matter what screen you will use FOV stay the same. But with big monitor you can increase FOV without loss of detail.

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Ofc it wont change FOV, FOV is game setting so no matter what screen you will use FOV stay the same. But with big monitor you can increase FOV without loss of detail.

 

This. The default FoV will stay the same obviously, but a ''realistic'' FoV will be possible without losing so much peripheral vision. I.e. if you configure the HUD to be 4'' across on a 19'' monitor, you will have relatively little view around that. On a 55'' TV, the HUD can be set about four inches across, but you'd have a ton of additional vision around it.

 

It's not that hard to understand.

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This. The default FoV will stay the same obviously, but a ''realistic'' FoV will be possible without losing so much peripheral vision. I.e. if you configure the HUD to be 4'' across on a 19'' monitor, you will have relatively little view around that. On a 55'' TV, the HUD can be set about four inches across, but you'd have a ton of additional vision around it.

 

It's not that hard to understand.

 

I just said exactly the same, i just point out that changing screen will not affect FOV in game.You will still see same FOV just much much bigger.

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PURE 3D SIMULATION:

 

Back in the 1990s, when the best desk top flight simulator was FS98, we were all forced to use fixed format windows containing an image that was a bitmap of fixed field of view (FoV), usually based on a photograph taken from a random eyepoint down a random eyeline at a random zoom.

 

In consequence the bitmap imposed was usually wholly out of scale with everything else in the simulation. It blocked sight lines and real world head up parallax compliances could not be learned or used. Parallax compliance and perspective were lost every time the outside scenery in the back window was zoomed and the fixed bitmap in the front window failed to zoom with it. Nobody could judge azimuth or range or glideslope unless zoom was always 1.0 and the developer actually understood that he was the scenery projectionist and bothered to learn how to project more or less the real slice of scenery into the random size out of scale apertures of the fixed FoV bitmap. Few third party developers ever understood or ever learned how to project the real slice of scenery. 2D panels were truly awful, but 20 years ago we had no choice. We also had no choice concerning our display. It was 8:6 aspect ratio, miserably small size, with miserable resolution rarely exceeding 600p.

 

It is now 2014 and there is no way for software developers to know the shape of your screen, the size of your screen (17 inch or 57 inch), the definition (600p / 720p / 1080p / 1200p / or more) of your screen, or the acuity of your corrected vision. 3D computing is the solution. These days we are each required to configure our personal display device to match our personal needs. Nobody can do that for us any more and that has absolutely nothing to do with flight simulation in particular.

 

When using the display we purchased with *any* software it is our job to create a window whose aspect ratio and microzoom in combination is 'fit for purpose'. Software developers have no idea whether we use a real 16:10 computer monitor, or only a 16:9 television (TV), or what type of digital cinematic projector we may own. A 16:9 TV shows at least 11% less of every kind of file compared to a real modern era 16:10 computer monitor. Whether we are loading a spreadsheet, a database, or just a pdf document, it is our job to create a window of appropriate shape and then impose a microzoom of the file in that window that is 'fit for purpose' using our personal hardware choices.

 

Many flight simulation enthusiasts still fail to understand the difference between a virtual window and a real window. The difference is critical. If we make a real window wider our lateral FOV increases. If instead we make a virtual window wider our lateral FoV reduces. Using a computer with MS windows we see more of the VC laterally in a narrower window. The wider the consumer runs the window versus its depth the more they reduce their lateral FoV. This becomes a significant problem if the consumer is trying to use a 16:9 widescreen TV as a computer monitor.

 

This 'maximum realism' simulation runs in 3D to impose real world scenery projection, sight line blocking, and parallax compliance cues in all directions, from multiple crew locations, at all times, at any zoom, in any simulation window of any aspect ratio. During 3D computing the 'inside view' and the 'outside view' share the same aspect ratio, and then they pan, and scroll and zoom together. That is a necessity during desk top flight simulation, if we hope to to learn and impose real world parallax compliances, not just watch a cartoon with random scenery placement, There is no 'fish eye' effect during 3D computing unless an inexperienced consumer imposes it.

 

 

- CREW TRAINING MANUAL FOR THE Z.1007bis ALCIONE (Series VII), FSAviator April 2014.

But I will agree that the default DCS FOV is absolutely terrible for 99% of new users. It needs to be massively reduced.

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There is no way u can simulate everything。In real world,naked eyes can spot an aircraft much farther away than any computer monitor can simulate。Pixels cannot scale very well。So zoom is necessary in this simulated world。Learn to use it。

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There is no way u can simulate everything。In real world,naked eyes can spot an aircraft much farther away than any computer monitor can simulate。Pixels cannot scale very well。So zoom is necessary in this simulated world。Learn to use it。

 

 

This is my gripe.

 

 

Running 28" 3840 × 2160 (4K) monitor and [Enter] zoom setting. (Will zoom to read gauges)

 

 

While everything is sweet in a boil - detection on merges at similar altitudes is ~ 1.5 miles, and maybe 2.25 mi. in the plan view.

 

 

Which means a 5,000 ft difference in elevation of a grey plane in a grey sky, or a green camo plane over the bocage of Normandy, is all but invisible.

 

 

The grey NZG A/C will sometimes disappear just on the zoom climb.

 

 

Find it necessary to use the map to intercept or reengage if drawn away.

 

 

Flew w/o labels for decades w/ CFS2, and never needed that. Five-Ten mile visibility was pretty reasonable.

 

 

Won't use the zoom, and refuse to use the labels.

 

 

 

 

Size at Distance - is a Squared function.

 

 

DSC - acts like it's linear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Won't use the zoom, and refuse to use the labels.

Size at Distance - is a Squared function.

DSC - acts like it's linear.

Bowie

 

 

"I refuse any solution to my self inflicted problem"

Sure thing, great reasoning there @@ It's not about a cheat, and not everything is about "muh immersion"

 

 

If you're able to see most your instruments on a 28" monitor, you're zoomed OUT too far, in comparison to reality. By "zooming in" you're not cheating or any such, you're adjusting your FoV to something semi-realistic for the size of your monitor.

 

 

And if you're not spotting objects farther away than a mile or two, I seriously doubt it's the monitor or DCS. Seriously, twenty miles away? Yeah, that's going to drop off due to the above mentioned FoV. But anything within ten miles is going to be rendering under any typical FoV a person might use (people using weird fisheye views notwithstanding). At "a mile or two", yeaaahhh... they're definitely visible. No question.

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About the zoom in and zoom out.

 

I think DCS have one of the most realistic way to handle the fact you can concentrate on small details and almost completely loose the peripherical vision. I don't see any other way to simulate this in a game than making the possibility to zoom in and out.

 

It's not perfect. But I don't think there is another way to simulate this.

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