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Auto throttle control


Oldfox
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Is the ATC still work in progress in landing mode or am I missing something? When engaging it at full flaps, the throttle reaction time of automatic controller is so slow that this is just unusable. When above on speed it cuts throttle of and you fall like a stone, then goes full throttle again way above on speed and so on and so on.

 

Anyone can use it as it is ?

 

Thanks!

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Have to agree here, don't use ATC while landing, as throttle is the mechanism while on speed that you would use to control your pitch.

 

I do NOT want to be picky, but I feel I have to say something to avoid later confusion: Using the throttle during landing does NOT change your pitch, but rather your sink rate. That is precisely why it is used during that flight envelope. You want to maintain your pitch in relation to the deck, and adjust your sink rate using "speed", thus throttle...

 

Again, I'm sorry to jump on your post, but I believe this precision is necessary to avoid the inevitable confusion with this subject.

 

Class dismissed! :megalol:

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I do NOT want to be picky, but I feel I have to say something to avoid later confusion: Using the throttle during landing does NOT change your pitch, but rather your sink rate. That is precisely why it is used during that flight envelope. You want to maintain your pitch in relation to the deck, and adjust your sink rate using "speed", thus throttle...

 

Again, I'm sorry to jump on your post, but I believe this precision is necessary to avoid the inevitable confusion with this subject.

 

Class dismissed! :megalol:

 

 

This may be true for most planes. But not the hornet. Since the FCS will maintain the set AOA, it will pitch up or down depending on your power setting.

If you increase throttle the plane will pitch up automatically to maintain the AOA.

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This may be true for most planes. But not the hornet. Since the FCS will maintain the set AOA, it will pitch up or down depending on your power setting.

If you increase throttle the plane will pitch up automatically to maintain the AOA.

 

 

 

 

The nose may pitch up in response to the input, especially when abrupt and large....and sure, you can bust out of on speed AOA, but the throttle is NOT used to adjust your pitch. It is used to control altitude (sink rate) as it does in any other aircraft, even a lowly Piper on final.

 

 

 

The Hornet's FCS does not allow the Hornet to work with a different set of aerodynamic laws.


 

VF-2 Bounty Hunters

 

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The nose may pitch up in response to the input, especially when abrupt and large....and sure, you can bust out of on speed AOA, but the throttle is NOT used to adjust your pitch. It is used to control altitude (sink rate) as it does in any other aircraft, even a lowly Piper on final.

 

 

 

The Hornet's FCS does not allow the Hornet to work with a different set of aerodynamic laws.

 

Semantics. My only point was that in the hornet the pitch will change when you change your throttle setting.

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Semantics. My only point was that in the hornet the pitch will change when you change your throttle setting.

 

Not exactly. Pitch remains the same with throttle movememt but altitude changes. Thats why your aoa stays the same when your on speed. Bit different.

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Not exactly. Pitch remains the same with throttle movememt but altitude changes. Thats why your aoa stays the same when your on speed. Bit different.

 

Not true. No plane will behave like you say(except maybe a harrier). If you keep a constant pitch in a normal plane and increase throttle the aircraft will indeed begin climbing but as the speed increases the AOA will decrease.

I know they say pitch for speed and throttle for altitude. I'm guessing that is because in low-speed, high AOA situations the altitude change is going to be more noticeable than the speed change.

 

The hornet is different however. You can easily try this yourself. Just get the plane stable and on-speed. Then increase throttle without touching the stick and watch the plane automatically pitch up.

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Not true. No plane will behave like you say(except maybe a harrier). If you keep a constant pitch in a normal plane and increase throttle the aircraft will indeed begin climbing but as the speed increases the AOA will decrease.

I know they say pitch for speed and throttle for altitude. I'm guessing that is because in low-speed, high AOA situations the altitude change is going to be more noticeable than the speed change.

 

The hornet is different however. You can easily try this yourself. Just get the plane stable and on-speed. Then increase throttle without touching the stick and watch the plane automatically pitch up.

 

The velocity marker moves, but that doesn't affect AOA, and therefore pitch. What you are seeing is the rate of climb/descent changing the position of the indicator in relation to the longitudinal axis. It isn't an indicator of pitch.

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Wow, I think you're all talking about the exact same thing but seeing it differently.

 

 

Yes, the throttle is used to manage sink rate, not speed, in landing configuration.

 

Yes, throttle adjustment will also cause the FCS to change pitch of the aircraft to try to maintain set AOA.

 

@NeilWillis

I was unaware the the TVV is a sinkrate indicator in landing configuration... I doubt it, but even if it is, the plane DOES in fact change pitch slightly with throttle adjustments, anyone can see that.


Edited by chrisofsweden
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The velocity marker moves, but that doesn't affect AOA, and therefore pitch. What you are seeing is the rate of climb/descent changing the position of the indicator in relation to the longitudinal axis. It isn't an indicator of pitch.

 

The TVV in relation the horizon-ladder is an indication of the angle of sinking. The actual sinkrate will depend on your speed and your angle of sinking.

The TVV in relation to your plane's nose direction is literally your AoA.

 

What I am seeing is, because I tested this, the plane pitching up and down when I adjust the throttle in landing mode. It is especially clear if you look at the plane sideways in F2 view.

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Pitch can change while AoA remains constant. Pitch in the landing scenario is (at least to me) the angle of the aircrafts nose (not TVV) compared to the horizon. Under this definition the Hornet will pitch up - Nose will rise according to the horizon - on application of power.

 

In fact it HAS to pitch up if the AoA is remaining constant as the two are linked once its trimmed on speed, within reason.

 

With other aircraft you can hold the nose in one spot compared to the horizon and vary the AoA using power to adjust your descent rate. This is not how the Hornet works, at least not in landing flap mode when the FCS wants to help maintain the trimmed AoA


Edited by Deano87

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