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Tips for ground handling


crudboy12
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I have a hell of a time steering the 109 on the runway. After a certain speed I can use the rudder to steer, but until then I have to steer with the brakes, and I can barely take off on a good day. With landings, I get it on the ground fine, but I often flip during the roll out. I have no rudder pedals. Any tips on getting this monster in hand?

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

A-10C, FC3, P-51, BF-109, UH-1, MI-8, KA-50, M2000C, AJS-37, Gazelle, F-5E, L-39, F-86, MiG-15, MiG-21.

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At low speeds, You have to steer with brakes a lot in all DCS warbirds except for Mustang (the only one with steerable tailwheel), so get used to it.

 

As for 109, bind the tailwheel lock toggle to some easily accessible button, use it often and don't even try to takeoff or land without it (possible to do without, but rather if one owns some pedals). Tailwheel lock and full stick back pretty much ensures Your plane rolls out dead straight after landing. Same applies to beginning of a takeoff run, it will be more challenging, but adding full right rudder and not using all manifold pressure (as in takeoff tutorial mission) should help as well.

i7 9700K @ stock speed, single GTX1070, 32 gigs of RAM, TH Warthog, MFG Crosswind, Win10.

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At low speeds, You have to steer with brakes a lot in all DCS warbirds except for Mustang (the only one with steerable tailwheel), so get used to it.

 

As for 109, bind the tailwheel lock toggle to some easily accessible button, use it often and don't even try to takeoff or land without it (possible to do without, but rather if one owns some pedals). Tailwheel lock and full stick back pretty much ensures Your plane rolls out dead straight after landing. Same applies to beginning of a takeoff run, it will be more challenging, but adding full right rudder and not using all manifold pressure (as in takeoff tutorial mission) should help as well.

 

After some practice I would prefer to use unlocked wheel. The reason is that as the tail begins to loose contact with the ground, the stability due to it disappears abruptly, so you need to react to possible instability, and react very fast and right.

As the wheel is unlocked you have no stability from the start... so, no surprise at all. :)

Ніщо так сильно не ранить мозок, як уламки скла від розбитих рожевих окулярів

There is nothing so hurtful for the brain as splinters of broken rose-coloured spectacles.

Ничто так сильно не ранит мозг, как осколки стекла от разбитых розовых очков (С) Me

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After some practice I would prefer to use unlocked wheel. The reason is that as the tail begins to loose contact with the ground, the stability due to it disappears abruptly, so you need to react to possible instability, and react very fast and right.

As the wheel is unlocked you have no stability from the start... so, no surprise at all. :)

 

You're a masochist Yo-Yo :-)

 

But indeed I also prefer it that way, at least as an additional form of thrill - and having to use differential braking...


Edited by jcomm

Flight Simulation is the Virtual Materialization of a Dream...

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Yo-Yo, that sounds plausible... and ambitious :D. But I admit that would teach him required habits before buying a Spitfire.

 

Question to OP, do You own at least a twist-stick for controling the rudder, or do You have to use a keyboard?

i7 9700K @ stock speed, single GTX1070, 32 gigs of RAM, TH Warthog, MFG Crosswind, Win10.

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Thanks for the tips. I didn't know their was a tail wheel lock, and I was using buttons on the stick to steer. I will try and see if I can do it better now.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

A-10C, FC3, P-51, BF-109, UH-1, MI-8, KA-50, M2000C, AJS-37, Gazelle, F-5E, L-39, F-86, MiG-15, MiG-21.

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