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Welcome to the forums.

If you mean for the curves, that's gonna be based on feel. I try not to use them at all, but to each their own.

Start with something like 10 and go uofrom there. Once it starts to feel sluggish, or the edges of your control get too sensitive, split the difference until it feels "right."

Just FYI, the curves desaturate the. Center of the stick travel, but the input/output ration increases exponentially from there, that's why I don't like them.

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I use a curvature of 20. Like Wrench said, it's personal preference and there are also some who recommend against curvature at all.

 

I tend not to need as much fine tuning at the extreme ends of the spectrum, which is why some degree of curvature works for me.

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Welcome to the forums.

If you mean for the curves, that's gonna be based on feel. I try not to use them at all, but to each their own.

Start with something like 10 and go uofrom there. Once it starts to feel sluggish, or the edges of your control get too sensitive, split the difference until it feels "right."

Just FYI, the curves desaturate the. Center of the stick travel, but the input/output ration increases exponentially from there, that's why I don't like them.

 

Okay do you have any tips on keeping the plane straight and not spinning out of control ?

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Hi Chiefsoasa,

 

A good rule that applies to most aviation is to keep your movements smooth and give the aircraft time to react to what you are doing. Avoid yanking the stick and only very rarely is full deflection of any controls required. Many aircraft can be flown also with a light pencil style grip on the stick. You should not need curves with the TM Warthog, it's better to learn without them since it will give you more uniform control later.

 

You want to be aware of your airspeed, too little will send you tumbling, but also having much speed and trying hard maneuvers will do likewise. It would also pay off to learn things like correct approach speeds from the manual.

 

Hope this helps, and welcome to DCS. It's a great sim.


Edited by DragonShadow
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Okay do you have any tips on keeping the plane straight and not spinning out of control ?

 

hey chiefsosa, i think something is wrong with your controls. go in to adjust conrols menu inside the options. there 2 drop down lists on the upper left corner. click on "A10C Sim" on the left one, and click one "Axis Commands" on the right one. this is the section you assign axises to actions.

 

In case you are a total stranger to actions or axises, what you want to do is assign your stick to pitch and roll actions and your throttle levers to thrust left and thrust right actions. If you have rudder pedals, assign them to the rudder action.

 

When i connected my warthog for the first time to my pc, dcs assign pitch roll thrust and rudder controls to both of my stick and throttle, so whenever i moved either one of them a10c started doing all kinds of crazy things.


Edited by kylekatarn720
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Adjust thrust to change altitude and pitch to change speed.

 

Sent from my Redmi 4 using Tapatalk

 

Well, I think this is rather true for low speed high-AOA regimes, mostly during landing rather than cruising speeds, or am I wrong? :smilewink:

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Well, I think this is rather true for low speed high-AOA regimes, mostly during landing rather than cruising speeds, or am I wrong? :smilewink:

 

It is a general rule. In the civil aviation you always climb/descent trimmed aircraft with the thrust. And without beeing able to control the aircraft in calm flight properly you cant do it in a high thrust/weght ration jet without fighting the controls.

 

In a cessna if you start climbing by pooling the yoke and not by adding power you will stall very soon :)

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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It is a general rule. In the civil aviation you always climb/descent trimmed aircraft with the thrust. And without beeing able to control the aircraft in calm flight properly you cant do it in a high thrust/weght ration jet without fighting the controls.

 

In a cessna if you start climbing by pooling the yoke and not by adding power you will stall very soon :)

 

I never said "if you increase your pitch you will not need to follow it up with thrust". That's obvious.

You wrote: "Adjust thrust to change altitude and pitch to change speed." What I said is, this "crosscontrol" comes rather in low speed regime. According to your statement, if you fly with throttle already to the firewall, you can't climb any more? :huh:

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I never said "if you increase your pitch you will not need to follow it up with thrust". That's obvious.

You wrote: "Adjust thrust to change altitude and pitch to change speed." What I said is, this "crosscontrol" comes rather in low speed regime. According to your statement, if you fly with throttle already to the firewall, you can't climb any more? :huh:

 

Well you cant climb anymore without loosing speed and at some point you will not be able to exchange speed for altitude anymore no metter how hard you are pooling ;)

 

"if you increase your pitch you will not need to follow it up with thrust" The correct approach is to increase the thrust and then the pitch ;)

 

It looks very easy to take F15 and start flying arround without much thinking about thrust and stick control, this is because those jets has a lot of power but you are fighting the controls without realizing it.

For exmaple you pull the stick start climbing, than you realizie you lost speed, push the thurst to compensate, but then the climb angle increase etc.. there is no fine control here :)

 

Anyway, my point is, if OP does not trim the aircraft after takeoff he will find himself fighting the stick all the time, which may let him think it is very unstable.

By practicing trimming and controlling altitude by thrust and speed by pitch angle you are understanding the real behaviour of the Aircraft and with time you start doing it intuitively even in hard manuevering siuations :)

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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As Kylekatarn720 says, I had the same issue when I first tried DCS flying an A-10C. The aircraft would suddenly go out of contol and then crash no matter what I did. I noticed if I moved my throttle, I could see my stick and pedals move. If you can see that happening you have the same thing, it's not your flying skills.

 

To fix it, I had to go into the control settings and delete and then re-setup the rudder and throttle axis.

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As Kylekatarn720 says, I had the same issue when I first tried DCS flying an A-10C. The aircraft would suddenly go out of contol and then crash no matter what I did. I noticed if I moved my throttle, I could see my stick and pedals move. If you can see that happening you have the same thing, it's not your flying skills.

 

To fix it, I had to go into the control settings and delete and then re-setup the rudder and throttle axis.

 

this i confirm. if left in default settings warthog throttle and rudder sliders are used as roll and pitch axises. you need to delete them from axis assignments. in fact, before starting to play, assign each and every button, switch, slider and axis yourself and save it as a profile i'd advice.

 

as for axis tuning, warthog centering is too powerful for my taste. and because of this i usually overshoot while making tiny adjustments. you can either use curvatures or a homemade joystick extension. there are lots of DIY tutorials about those extensions. but if you get overwhelmed or simply feel too lazy to make one yourself, i can sell you one for a good price :) i made mine out of a flashlight. eventhough it's plastic, it feels sturdy too. have enough spare parts to make a new one. just so you know.

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