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Name this F14 part


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looked like horse nail to me

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Anyone else amazed that one little bolt holds the entire force of the plane catching the cable?

 

The tailhook shank actually takes the majority of the force when the hook point grabs a wire. There is a lip that the point slides on to that creates contact between the hook shank and hook point all around the center of the hook point. The bolt mainly just holds the hook point to the shank.

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Hooker.

If you want to talk to anyone about anything personal, send it to their PM box. Interpersonal drama and ad hominem rebuttal are things that do not belong on a thread viewed by the public.

One thing i have to point out... naming a thread.. "OK, so" is as useful as tits on a bull.
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  • 1 month later...

I have a question about an F-14 part. On the bottom of the engines there is a large fin of sorts, sometimes the squadron number is on it, sometimes not. Always wondered what it is actually called, and the references that I find on the internet that are labelled render with the print too small for me to see.

 

Ea5ZIdQ.jpg?1

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I have a question about an F-14 part. On the bottom of the engines there is a large fin of sorts, sometimes the squadron number is on it, sometimes not. Always wondered what it is actually called, and the references that I find on the internet that are labelled render with the print too small for me to see.

 

Ea5ZIdQ.jpg?1

 

The ventral fins give stability at high AoA when the vertical stabs aren't getting a lot of airflow across the rudders,(aerospace engineer- make this sound better or correct it). They have small intakes for cooling air for the afterburner duct.

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I have a question about an F-14 part. On the bottom of the engines there is a large fin of sorts, sometimes the squadron number is on it, sometimes not. Always wondered what it is actually called, and the references that I find on the internet that are labelled render with the print too small for me to see.

 

Ea5ZIdQ.jpg?1

 

As others note, but with a slightly different explanation according to http://www.anft.net/f-14/f14-detail-fin.htm

 

"The main purpose of the ventral fins on the underside of each engine of the F-14 is to enhance longitudinal stability together with the vertical tails. Also, they house the air intakes for the engine heat exchangers: Despite of what is written in a few books, both ventral fins house such an air intake. They are both on the same side of each ventral fin as shown in the photos below."

 

 

f14-%20ventral%20fins_zpsrep7jaji.gif.html?sort=3&o=0

128794214_f14-ventralfins.gif.24eb974f593437ed1ca198ec7aca0a6f.gif


Edited by punk

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As others note, but with a slightly different explanation according to http://www.anft.net/f-14/f14-detail-fin.htm

 

The main purpose of the ventral fins on the underside of each engine of the F-14 is to enhance longitudinal stability together with the vertical tails. Also, they house the air intakes for the engine heat exchangers: Despite of what is written in a few books, both ventral fins house such an air intake. They are both on the same side of each ventral fin as shown in the photos below.

 

 

f14-%20ventral%20fins_zpsrep7jaji.gif.html?sort=3&o=0

 

They enhance the vertical stability (directional), not the longitudinal.


Edited by addde
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They enhance the vertical stability (directional), not the longitudinal.

longitudinal refers to the longitudinal axis, being the x axis, instability in the x axis would be rotations in the y and z axes, and as pitch isnt relevant in this scenario, it leaves the z axis, aka your "vertical" axis.

 

you're not correcting anyone


Edited by probad

МИР

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longitudinal refers to the longitudinal axis, being the x axis, instability in the x axis would be rotations in the y and z axes, and as pitch isnt relevant in this scenario, it leaves the z axis, aka your "vertical" axis.

 

you're not correcting anyone

 

http://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/17291/what-are-lateral-longitudinal-and-directional-stability

 

here you go buddy

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Is the diagram mislabeled? It seems to have the control axis correct as well as the correct parts stabilized, but the names seem weird to me. I understand that it points to "vertical stability" for the rudder and vertical stab, but vertical stability sounds like it would be regarding pitch movement.

 

We use the same in the maritime world, and the diagram jives with longitudinal and lateral stability, but I've never used or heard the term "vertical axis" for yaw stab. Again, I'm a professional mariner, not a pilot.

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Is the diagram mislabeled? It seems to have the control axis correct as well as the correct parts stabilized, but the names seem weird to me. I understand that it points to "vertical stability" for the rudder and vertical stab, but vertical stability sounds like it would be regarding pitch movement.

 

We use the same in the maritime world, and the diagram jives with longitudinal and lateral stability, but I've never used or heard the term "vertical axis" for yaw stab. Again, I'm a professional mariner, not a pilot.

 

Yea its more commonly known as the normal axis


Edited by addde
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Latitudinal Stability refers to Roll Axis,

Longitudinal Stability refers to Pitch Axis.

Directional Stability refers to Yaw Axis (or Movement Perpendicular to Direction of Travel).

 

Seeing how the Ventral Stabs Keep the Aircraft from yawing, it's Directional Stability.

 

 

The Axis the Surface is Oriented on is not the Axis it affects.

 

Just because the surface appears to be aligned w/ the Longitudinal Axis, does not mean it's providing Longitudinal Stability.

 

Even then, the Ventral Fins are Mounted/Oriented on the Vertical Axis (Not Longitudinal), there fore they provide Directional Stability, Like Vertical Stabs.

Just because they are longer on the Longitudinal Axis, does not mean they are Oriented on that Axis.


Edited by SkateZilla

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The OP Pic Part is a Hook Point Shoe.

 

You can buy one online for about $125. Milage may vary.

 

Friend of mine has one in his office that came off an F18 and it looks identical to the one pictured.


Edited by MegOhm_SD

 

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