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Spitfire after 1.5.6 update


beagleRampant
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After thinking I'd tamed the Spit, I seemed to have reverted to newb status with regard to takeoff (landings I've pretty much nailed). I was having a really hard time keeping anything that would pass as a straight line during takeoff runs.

 

However, after updating to 1.5.6 it almost seems like a different bird and I have become an "expert" overnight. I've just done 5 consecutive takeoffs with no incident or swerving. Just beautiful graceful floating into the skies. I was so impressed by my "skills" I even double-checked takeoff assist and auto rudder were still off (yes, they were off).

 

Overall, it seems so much smoother. I love it! I hope it hasn't been made "easier" for us whiners and is a truer reflection of the aircraft's handling.

 

Good job! Back to the skies...

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Jeff Ethell's Pireps http://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/supermarine-spitfire-134209906/

 

"All Spitfires are exceptionally easy to land with no inherent tendency to swerve or groundloop. Just reduce power to idle, flare to a three point attitude and she sets down on a feather almost every time. This is a great surprise to most considering the narrow track undercarriage and full swivel, non-locking tailwheel. Why doesn't it drop a wing violently or make the pilot stomp on the rudders? I wish I knew. The genius of managing to combine light aircraft characteristics with such high performance is nothing short of miraculous compared to most other wartime tailwheel types. One or two landings in the Spitfire and you are in love for life."

 

Then there is also this:

 

http://www.vintagewings.ca/VintageNews/Stories/tabid/116/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/255/Flying-the-Spitfire--with-Mike-Potter.aspx

 

"The only challenges on landing are poor forward visibility and the need to be pretty comfortable with three-point landing technique. A gently curving approach to the runway threshold will solve the visibility problem. (And, by the way, all those World War II Spitfire veterans were taught that way and will expect to see it.) Over the fence at 90 knots and a last look speed of 80 knots and you will be well set up. Take a good look at the cross wind as you come short final and program your mind for how much side slip you want to feed in on the flare, because it is not easy to judge the drift once that long nose starts to come up. Flare to a tail low or three point attitude, remembering again how light and responsive the elevator is, and enjoy the arrival. It may jiggle around a bit on that ridiculously narrow undercarriage, but there is no mean streak in this airplane. Although the tail wheel is free castoring, the big rudder is very effective as long as you are reasonable fast with your feet.

Oh, and easy, very easy, on the brakes.

At this point it is worth a moment’s thought for the Spitfire’s arch rival in the sky – Messerschmitt’s Bf109. When our Spitfire pilot disengaged from a fight and headed home, his thoughts might easily turn to a beer with his buddies in the pilot’s mess. The 109 pilot, on the other hand, must have still been giving some serious thought to getting on the ground safely. While the Spit is such a pussycat, it is estimated that about one third of all 109’s built were destroyed in take off and landing accidents with major loss of life. It is reputed to be a very difficult airplane to land."

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The flight model has been changed - it is particularly noticable on the roll out where the tendency to ground loop has been considerably reined in.

 

It is inevitable that the flight model will be fine tuned for some time yet, as this must be the single hardest thing to get absolutely right. Take a look at the most persistent themes for any other module if you have any doubt about that.

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A stupid question I know, but have you checked your "Takeoff Assist" settings since the update?

 

I was surprised to find that for some reason all my modules that used this feature had it set to full on after a recent update. Previously I had set them all to zero.

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A stupid question I know, but have you checked your "Takeoff Assist" settings since the update?

 

I was surprised to find that for some reason all my modules that used this feature had it set to full on after a recent update. Previously I had set them all to zero.

 

Did you even read his post?

 

 

After thinking I'd tamed the Spit, I seemed to have reverted to newb status with regard to takeoff (landings I've pretty much nailed). I was having a really hard time keeping anything that would pass as a straight line during takeoff runs.

 

However, after updating to 1.5.6 it almost seems like a different bird and I have become an "expert" overnight. I've just done 5 consecutive takeoffs with no incident or swerving. Just beautiful graceful floating into the skies. I was so impressed by my "skills" I even double-checked takeoff assist and auto rudder were still off (yes, they were off).

 

Overall, it seems so much smoother. I love it! I hope it hasn't been made "easier" for us whiners and is a truer reflection of the aircraft's handling.

 

Good job! Back to the skies...

Justificus

 

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Finally had a chance to try T/O and landing circuits with the latest update.

 

Certainly considerably easier to keep a straight line during T/O and landings, with a lot less tendency to swing or drop a wing. Landings also seem more forgiving with less ballooning if you misjudge your speed, although this also seemed to be the scenario that if I was going to ground a wing, it would happen. I wonder if this is down to changes in the damping for the main gear, it seems like it might have had a shot of viagra damping ?

 

If I have any questions though it's the apparent shortness of the take off run, which always takes me by surprise ( It might just be a question of perception rather than actuality) also, for some reason their seems to be a lack of longitudinal stability just after take off that doesn't seem to be there during any other phase of flight, even when I try to recreate fishtailing once airborne.


Edited by Damocles
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If I have any questions though it's the apparent shortness of the take off run, which always takes me by surprise ( It might just be a question of perception rather than actuality) also, for some reason their seems to be a lack of longitudinal stability just after take off that doesn't seem to be there during any other phase of flight, even when I try to recreate fishtailing once airborne.

 

Probably due to the pitching down moment created by the gear, and the fact that neutral pitch trim is usually the one set for takeoff, while inflight, at higher AoAs, or during approach in landing configuration, plenty of "tail-heavy" trim is required instead.

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