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What areas are not modeled in flight simulators ?


peker
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I teach junior high school students Virtual Aviation

 

I Greatly appreciatet to read more aspects of the Aviation that can not show in pc simulator

 

(I choose to teach with the il1946 because it's the cheapest stimulator and my principal rate me some money and I had to divide it between several components: joysticks etc )

 

 

Thank you

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I wish my school taught flight simulators! I Would have "aced" that class! :smartass:

Come fly with me, lets fly, lets fly away! -Sinatra

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Would have loved to take such a class when I was in school. :thumbup:

 

Like uboats says, DCS World is free and you can pick both the Su-25T and the TF-51D as flyable aircraft without spending a dime on the software.

 

I've never piloted a real aircraft. Reading from many real pilots over the years I guess the biggest thing that isn't simulated is actually feeling the forces that act on the aircraft and the body, aka the butt-meter.

 

We are forced to watch instruments and get visual feedback, where real pilots would actually feel an aircraft's tendency to slip, yaw, roll, accellerate and so on.

 

Peripheral vision is another thing, although canopy frames and such do limit visiblity in real life as well.

 

With VR, most who use it say the depth perception is astonishing. Guessing you can't just order a truckload of Rifts for your class, that'll be a limiting factor as well.

 

On the other hand, where real pilots might struggle with false indications and might get fooled by sensory input, I believe we have an easier time relying on instruments in IMC. It's still pretty tough to fly completely blind, but at least our bodies don't urge us to climb or descend based on an accelleration we just felt.

 

And we lack the smell of aviation fuel in the morning. :D

 

Aside from that, don't expect anything classified to be simulated, and if it is, expect it to be simulated in a rather unrealistic way.

 

Specifically regarding DCS, forget about the ATC. It's so rudimentary, best to ignore it altogether. On the upside, there are mods that enable people to act as human ATC. :thumbup:

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DCS is free

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Including a TF-51D unarmed Mustang.

So with "invest" into rudder pedals, and sticks/throttles you can utilize excellent flight and systems modelling to teach most aspects of aviation. ;)

Shagrat

 

- Flying Sims since 1984 -:pilotfly:

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Would have loved to take such a class when I was in school. :thumbup:

 

Like uboats says, DCS World is free and you can pick both the Su-25T and the TF-51D as flyable aircraft without spending a dime on the software.

 

I've never piloted a real aircraft. Reading from many real pilots over the years I guess the biggest thing that isn't simulated is actually feeling the forces that act on the aircraft and the body, aka the butt-meter.

 

We are forced to watch instruments and get visual feedback, where real pilots would actually feel an aircraft's tendency to slip, yaw, roll, accellerate and so on.

 

Peripheral vision is another thing, although canopy frames and such do limit visiblity in real life as well.

 

With VR, most who use it say the depth perception is astonishing. Guessing you can't just order a truckload of Rifts for your class, that'll be a limiting factor as well.

 

On the other hand, where real pilots might struggle with false indications and might get fooled by sensory input, I believe we have an easier time relying on instruments in IMC. It's still pretty tough to fly completely blind, but at least our bodies don't urge us to climb or descend based on an accelleration we just felt.

 

And we lack the smell of aviation fuel in the morning. :D

 

Aside from that, don't expect anything classified to be simulated, and if it is, expect it to be simulated in a rather unrealistic way.

 

Specifically regarding DCS, forget about the ATC. It's so rudimentary, best to ignore it altogether. On the upside, there are mods that enable people to act as human ATC. :thumbup:

 

THIS!

 

I have transitioned from simming to real world flight and I find that if I can successfully master an aircraft in the simulator, these additional inputs make it much easier to fly the real thing. I have not done any instrument flight other than the basic requirements for the visual rating so I cannot attest to the "false input" one might get in true IMC but I'm sure this is all spot on.

 

Highspeed

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I've never piloted a real aircraft. Reading from many real pilots over the years I guess the biggest thing that isn't simulated is actually feeling the forces that act on the aircraft and the body, aka the butt-meter.

 

There was a company close to here flying a Pitts special that would take you up, give you the stick, let you fly a bit, then demo rolls, loops, Cuban 8s etc then give you the stick and let you have a go.

 

Not talking about taking off and landing, but in flight the single biggest issue I had wasn't the feeling, it was that after flying with an MSFFB II all my movements were so small, and to get the aircraft to react correctly (say, roll at a reasonable rate), the movements had to be BIG.

 

(the second biggest issue was following instructions - but that's the story of my life...)

 

If you're teaching aviation from the SIM, maybe invest in some stick extensions ?

Cheers.

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There was a company close to here flying a Pitts special that would take you up, give you the stick, let you fly a bit, then demo rolls, loops, Cuban 8s etc then give you the stick and let you have a go.

 

Not talking about taking off and landing, but in flight the single biggest issue I had wasn't the feeling, it was that after flying with an MSFFB II all my movements were so small, and to get the aircraft to react correctly (say, roll at a reasonable rate), the movements had to be BIG.

 

(the second biggest issue was following instructions - but that's the story of my life...)

 

If you're teaching aviation from the SIM, maybe invest in some stick extensions ?

 

Funny; I had the opposite experience: after a while of flying the DCS Mustang, I went up with a company that flies SF.260 military trainers, and my experience was that the stick was so sensitive that you basically had to *think* where you wanted the aircraft to go (even for 6-7 g maneuvers), rather than make any consciously discernable movements.

 

Seems it just varies from aircraft to aircraft.

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I would recommend using something like Flight Simulator X Steam Edition. You can pick that up at a very reasonable price. That way you could conduct your flight lessons from a local airport that the children would be able to relate to, and fly a simple aircraft such as the C172. FSX also has it's own flight lesson 'campaigns' where you can earn a "virtual pilot's license".

 

What areas are not modeled in flight sims? Well, these days it mostly is the "ground school" subjects. We are now used to learning about aircraft systems in the higher end sims, but things like Human Performance, Regulations, Aerodynamics, Flight Planning and Meteorology that tend to be glossed over. There is a lot more to being a pilot than simply flying the airplane. Of course, that may be beyond the scope of what you are trying to achieve at this point.

 

It should also be said that there are a lot of people who work in the field of aviation who are not pilots... Mechanics, Technicians, Air Traffic Controllers, etc etc. They are all important parts of the big picture.

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