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Real huey review/vid


trigen
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Came across this one while watching some Huey stuff and like the camera angles and discussion.

 

Could be of interest to others too :) Startup checklist is around 19:50

 


Edited by trigen
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With youtube vids post everything after the =

General 3D modeling thread and reference sites

UK liveries for planes, ships and MODS.

The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance.

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looks way too easier than flying dcs uh-1.

pilot wasn't fighting with cycling although he could hover and level flight very smoothly. he was just making very tiny adjustments

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looks way too easier than flying dcs uh-1.

pilot wasn't fighting with cycling although he could hover and level flight very smoothly. he was just making very tiny adjustments

 

That may have something to do with the fact that his cyclic is 4 times longer than our joysticks.

YouTube Channel: "Clutch"

 

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looks way too easier than flying dcs uh-1.

pilot wasn't fighting with cycling although he could hover and level flight very smoothly. he was just making very tiny adjustments

 

That's how it works for me flying DCS Huey small inputs especially cyclic and I have my controls dialed down for cyclic no dead spots just saturation at about 40% and the DCS Huey seems to fly just the way the real Huey flies in the video. I've also asked a RL Bell 412 pilot how the controls feel and it's close.

 

BTW the pilot is ex military and flew a Tiger says it had way more power than the 412

Control is an illusion which usually shatters at the least expected moment.

Gazelle Mini-gun version is endorphins with rotors. See above.

 

Currently rolling with a Asus Z390 Prime, 9600K, 32GB RAM, SSD, 2080Ti and Windows 10Pro, Rift CV1. bu0836x and Scratch Built Pedals, Collective and Cyclic.

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I've posted in these forums before commenting on the DCS: UH-1H and will again confirm that it fly's remarkably similar to the real world UH-1H. I have over 2200 hours in the U.S. Army flying the UH-1H flew very few hours with the force trim on...mostly while flying instrument flights.

 

As the pilot in the video demonstrated, it doesn't take much movement of the cyclic to redirect the aircraft's direction of flight so very small movements are that are necessary. This is true of the DCS UH-1 too. If you learn to fly with your finger tips (and not grip the cyclic tightly), your skills will improve and your hovering technique will smooth out.

 

I flew in the real world by resting my right hand on the right thigh and flying with just my finger tips, making the smallest of movements...watch this pilots cyclic technique and try to replicate it...you won't be disappointed with your learning curve.

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Of course flying with your fingertips may still not work depending on your joystick. As much as I try small movements with my X52 the stick just doesn't want to cooperate. Say I want to move the stick slightly, I gently add pressure but the stick refuses to move. Once I apply enough pressure for the stick to get "unstuck" it ends up moving twice the amount I want it to. Same for my rudder pedals.

YouTube Channel: "Clutch"

 

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Of course flying with your fingertips may still not work depending on your joystick. As much as I try small movements with my X52 the stick just doesn't want to cooperate. Say I want to move the stick slightly, I gently add pressure but the stick refuses to move. Once I apply enough pressure for the stick to get "unstuck" it ends up moving twice the amount I want it to. Same for my rudder pedals.

 

This is probably an important difference the stick feel in a heli has no centre detent and I guess just resistance (waiting to actually order a sim stick prolly Komodo) this is also why I have cyclic dialled down at saturation at 40% (even considering reducing more) the why I understand it is you apply force in the desired direction the more force the more the effect on the aircraft?? I currently use a logitech extreme pro 3d for cyclic and use the slider for collective with curvature set to 27. And I do rest my hand on the stick no point strangling it.

 

 

I am not a pilot just to get that out there. I find I am flying the Huey, difficult to explain but think of it like flying it from a second to a few seconds ahead of where you actually are and applying a smaller amount of correction for the future attitude of the aircraft and letting the mass of the aircraft average the corrections but there is more to it.

 

Sometimes I find the less correction(s) I put in the better I fly. :thumbup:

 

RL Pilots and Pilots feel free to correct me I'd rather get it right, but that's what I have gathered and learnt then applied.

 

<Edit>

 

The similar thing applies to the likes of my Saitek peddles I still need to remove the detent mechanism that causes control to go a bit off overcomming the centre detent possition, going across that is annoying,.. grr


Edited by FragBum
<Edit> and typo

Control is an illusion which usually shatters at the least expected moment.

Gazelle Mini-gun version is endorphins with rotors. See above.

 

Currently rolling with a Asus Z390 Prime, 9600K, 32GB RAM, SSD, 2080Ti and Windows 10Pro, Rift CV1. bu0836x and Scratch Built Pedals, Collective and Cyclic.

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I've posted in these forums before commenting on the DCS: UH-1H and will again confirm that it fly's remarkably similar to the real world UH-1H. I have over 2200 hours in the U.S. Army flying the UH-1H flew very few hours with the force trim on...mostly while flying instrument flights.

 

As the pilot in the video demonstrated, it doesn't take much movement of the cyclic to redirect the aircraft's direction of flight so very small movements are that are necessary. This is true of the DCS UH-1 too. If you learn to fly with your finger tips (and not grip the cyclic tightly), your skills will improve and your hovering technique will smooth out.

 

I flew in the real world by resting my right hand on the right thigh and flying with just my finger tips, making the smallest of movements...watch this pilots cyclic technique and try to replicate it...you won't be disappointed with your learning curve.

 

Thanks for the input, very interesting! Do you use any curves to the cyclic in DCS?

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I wonder that too

FC3 | UH-1H | Mi-8MTV2 | A-10C II | F/A-18C | Ka-50 | F-14A/B | F-16CAH-64

Persian Gulf | Nevada | Syria | NS-430 | Supercarrier // Wishlist: C-130 | UH-60 | F-4E

 

Youtube

Z390 / i7 9700K / RTX3070 / 32 GB Ram / 500 gb SSD and 1 tb HDD // CH Fighterstick - MS FFB2 - TM Warthog - CH Pro Pedals - Trackir 4 and 5

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It dont take much thats for sure. I got a fairly long shaft on my stick and some dampers and its more putting pressure on it that actually moving it when i want to be real accurate in hovers. Its less than on the video though. Tend to fly with just 3 fingers also if im not doing any combat. Id love to know how the stick and everything feels if its possible to describe that?

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Of course flying with your fingertips may still not work depending on your joystick. As much as I try small movements with my X52 the stick just doesn't want to cooperate. Say I want to move the stick slightly, I gently add pressure but the stick refuses to move. Once I apply enough pressure for the stick to get "unstuck" it ends up moving twice the amount I want it to. Same for my rudder pedals.

 

 

I also have the X52 and have actually solved this problem if you are interested. I started by putting Vasoline on the bottom of the round quarter cup that's seated in the receptacle where the stick goes into the main box. It worked for a short time and made everything very smooth. But Vasoline seems to get whiped to the side after a bit and not lubricate very well, so you are back to that sticky feeling when you are doing precision maneuvering. So I went to axle grease. And it did a little better but I found something that works like a charm and I have not had to re apply. You take axle grease and mix in graphite with it and put it on. I have had it there for over a year and never had the problem again. In fact, I am not fond of the low tension in my X52 and have a washer inserted between the spring and the stick to make it much more tight and it still works very smoothly with the lubricant. Give it a try and you'll feel a big difference. :joystick:

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I don't use curves of any kind with the Huey (or any other DCS aircraft, for that matter). I'm not much of a "computer guy" so I don't know how to set the curves, I participate in DCS more as a pilot and as such don't know if curves would help or hinder the "feel" of the controls but I can tell you that the "default" settings of my Warthog give me the desired feel of the real world UH-1H.

 

All real world pilots (and virtual pilots) use muscle memory when controlling their aircraft. Every pilot has a "feel" that is specific to each control and the default settings of the Warthog are very close to the "feel" that I use to get in the "real" UH-1.

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229th battalion, 1st Cavalry

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I don't use curves of any kind with the Huey (or any other DCS aircraft, for that matter). I'm not much of a "computer guy" so I don't know how to set the curves, I participate in DCS more as a pilot and as such don't know if curves would help or hinder the "feel" of the controls but I can tell you that the "default" settings of my Warthog give me the desired feel of the real world UH-1H.

 

All real world pilots (and virtual pilots) use muscle memory when controlling their aircraft. Every pilot has a "feel" that is specific to each control and the default settings of the Warthog are very close to the "feel" that I use to get in the "real" UH-1.

 

Thanks appreciate your answer. What I'm mostly curious about though since I've never flown a real one is the friction forces on the sticks. With force trim off, is it completely loose? Does it have any sort of friction at all or would it just fall down if you let it go? It looks to me that it's firm enough not to fall down on its own but I have no idea. I'd like to try and replicate it as best I can.

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A private message was sent by reflected so I thought I'd answer it here so everyone could benefit from the questions:

 

 

As far as I understood, you flew Huey’s for real? May I ask a few questions?

 

I'm just a glider pilot, and never even flew in a helicopter, but I'm very, very interested in Huey’s. I read all the Vietnam Huey pilot books I could get my hands on, but none of them go into too much technical detail.

 

Thanks for the advice, flying with 2 fingers did help a lot with my hovers! (I use a FFB stick)

 

Do you use any curves for the cyclic in DCS?

What are the biggest, most noticeable differences between DCS and real Huey’s in terms of flight behavior?

In real life, how often did you use the force trim button?

I'm having a hard time flying the Huey straight. Do you have to apply right pedal for it to go straight at higher speeds?

What does a standard approach look like in terms of speed and descent rate?

 

Sorry for flooding you with so many questions, but I'm very much interested in your experience.

 

Thanks a lot in advance,

reflected

 

 

Hi reflected,

 

I will certainly do my best to answer all of your questions. Yes, I spent 16 years flying in the U.S. Army as an Aviation Warrant Officer, flying UH-1's and UH-60's.

 

1. I don't use curves of any kind with the Huey (or any other DCS aircraft, for that matter). I'm not much of a "computer guy" so I don't know how to set the curves, I participate in DCS more as a pilot and as such don't know if curves would help or hinder the "feel" of the controls but I can tell you that the "default" settings of my Warthog give me the desired feel of the real world UH-1H.

 

All real world pilots (and virtual pilots) use muscle memory when controlling their aircraft. Every pilot has a "feel" that is specific to each control and the default settings of the Warthog are very close to the "feel" that I use to get in the "real" UH-1.

 

2. Probably the biggest difference between the DCS model and the real world model is the seat of the pants feel that you get in the real aircraft. The flight dynamics of the DCS model are pretty accurate so I get a good "feel" from the control inputs.

 

3. I rarely used the force trim. I found it taxing at times because I would tend to exert a small amount of pressure on the cyclic that would eventually lead to fighting with the controls without my noticing. Because I preferred fling with my fingertips I didn’t want any resistance (except friction that I had added to the control). The force trim is a good practice during instrument flights to help combat fatigue but I had to remember that it was on during the approach. I have to say for the real world folk out there who are reading this as a “qualifier”…force trim is completely up to the individual pilots taste…some pilots will argue that they can’t fly without it…I say good for them…I didn’t fly with it and most pilots that I knew didn’t.

 

4. Flying straight and level takes a coordinated effort. Make absolutely sure that the aircraft is in trim. This is probably the biggest issue you’re having. Watch that trim ball. If the aircraft isn’t trimmed, it won’t fly straight. I’m an instructor pilot with the 229th and when I’m training members there are two things that my students will hear me say over and over… don’t touch the collective and watch your trim. Folks who are new to the Huey have a bad habit of “pumping” the collective. Once you’ve set you’re climb, cruise, or decent power setting (torque setting), don’t touch it…leave it alone. Next, watch the trim ball. There is a saying in aviation, “step on the ball”…what that means is…the ball should be centered between the two vertical lines. Step on the pedal corresponding vertical line the ball is crossing. If it’s crossing the left line…step on the left petal…if it’s crossing the right line…step on the right petal. This will trim the aircraft. This works in “ALL” aircraft.

 

5. A standard approach in a UH-1 should be a “shallow approach”, with a rate of closure that looks like a “brisk walk.” It can be hard to judge an approach angle if I told you it should be between 50 and 70 degrees so I will give you visual ques that are better to understand and have helped me. When you initiate your approach you should identify your landing spot on the ground. It should be an easily identifiable object such as an intersection, truck, runway identifier…anything that you won’t lose track of. Put that landing “spot” approximately 6 inches above the top of your instrument panel. You should have already started to slow the aircraft down from 90 knots (cruise speed) to approach speed. Using your peripheral vision, you should get a “sense” that you are at a brisk walk. You should have this “sensation” throughout the approach. As you get closer the ground, this “sensation” of a “brisk walk” will continue to slow your approach. A proper VMC approach is to the ground…flat pitch (in the real world, ATC might want you to get the heck off the runway so might not allow you to land to the ground).

 

Sorry for being so long winded reflected but I hope I answered your questions (My guys at the 229th think I talk too much too…lol)

 

flyer


Edited by flyer49
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Thanks Flyer49 more is always good. :thumbup:

 

Iv'e got the place your landing point on/above the dash trick that works a treat. :thumbup:

 

I also have questions if you have the time much appreciated.

Control is an illusion which usually shatters at the least expected moment.

Gazelle Mini-gun version is endorphins with rotors. See above.

 

Currently rolling with a Asus Z390 Prime, 9600K, 32GB RAM, SSD, 2080Ti and Windows 10Pro, Rift CV1. bu0836x and Scratch Built Pedals, Collective and Cyclic.

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Thanks. Gonna be trying that approach tomorrow and see how things go. Got about 14h in the huey now but mostly hovering auto rotations and combat. Not that great on normal landings

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flyer 49, thank you so much for taking your time to go into such details. It's extremely interesting for me who never flew helicopters for real. I never would have thought some pilots turn force trim completely off, but now that you say it it makes sense! I will give it a try. I will also work on my trim.

 

Thanks again for sharing!

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I just flew a mission with the force trim turned off, and put my stick on the chair, between my legs so I could rest my forearm on my legs and only use 3 fingers to fly. What a difference it made! Stable hovers, and accurate landings like I've never done before!!! Thank you again for the advice!

 

I also figured that setting a large FOV helps compensate for the lack of the seat of the pants feeling, as you immediately see if the Huey starts to drift in one direction or another when you takeoff and land.

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Thanks for posting those answers! Really helpfull (I fly with FFB Force Trim in DCS because it lets me take my hand off the cyclic and use keyboard, tune radios or whatever, and I don't feel like passing my controls over to AI copilot lol). Also does anyone know what would be your typical cruising altitude in a real UH-1H?

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Thanks for posting those answers! Really helpfull (I fly with FFB Force Trim in DCS because it lets me take my hand off the cyclic and use keyboard, tune radios or whatever, and I don't feel like passing my controls over to AI copilot lol). Also does anyone know what would be your typical cruising altitude in a real UH-1H?

For this reason I bind my trim button to the trigger of a g940 and basically fly with it held down all the time to get non force trim feel on the controls. When I release stick and trigger the force trim activates & holds it in place so I can stay in same attitude. Like a dead man switch.

Otter

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For this reason I bind my trim button to the trigger of a g940 and basically fly with it held down all the time to get non force trim feel on the controls. When I release stick and trigger the force trim activates & holds it in place so I can stay in same attitude. Like a dead man switch.

 

Must be easier to just bind force trim on/off to a button or press left alt u ;)

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