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Viggen in Depth - 01 - Cold and Dark


Cobra847
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Fast Start-up

 

The speed of this start up is impressive. It matches what some of the "viggenites" have thought us over the past few months in terms of doctrine. That navigation computer looks retro, and I can't wait to interact with it! :joystick: Thanks for sharing.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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Really enjoyed the video, just had a quick question so in the video its mentioned that the data cartridge holds stuff like origin, destination, waypoints, and -weapon targeting waypoints-

 

Is there a way to input these manually into the computer? I am just thinking of multiplayer instances where you might have to make changes to these to reflect the current mission state / requirements.

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I recognized the Serial number 37431 at 3:37.

That is impossible as that is a JA37 Viggen.

 

http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/photo/001009942.html

 

You need to pick a number between 37001 and 37108

 

We have a running joke on how quick someone would notice. :P

 

The serial number is as such as we used a photo of the Ja-37Di in Graz.

Same thing with the roundel, actually.

 

Both things are on the fixlist. ;)

Nicholas Dackard

 

Founder & Lead Artist

Heatblur Simulations

 

https://www.facebook.com/heatblur/

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Slightly off topic, but since the data cartridge seems to be a hot topic: does anyone know anything about the real world implementation of the data cartridge? Which type of storage media was used etc.? The main software of the CK37 seems to be stored in magnetic core memory, but that's not a viable solution for something that has to be re-programmable like the data cartridges. Did they use regular magnetic storage (tape/disc) or replaceable OTP PROMs? Or something completely different?

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Slightly off topic, but since the data cartridge seems to be a hot topic: does anyone know anything about the real world implementation of the data cartridge? Which type of storage media was used etc.? The main software of the CK37 seems to be stored in magnetic core memory, but that's not a viable solution for something that has to be re-programmable like the data cartridges. Did they use regular magnetic storage (tape/disc) or replaceable OTP PROMs? Or something completely different?

 

Found this page, little info but interesting http://www.datasaab.se/Bildarkiv/bildarkiv_eng.htm

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Slightly off topic, but since the data cartridge seems to be a hot topic: does anyone know anything about the real world implementation of the data cartridge? Which type of storage media was used etc.? The main software of the CK37 seems to be stored in magnetic core memory, but that's not a viable solution for something that has to be re-programmable like the data cartridges. Did they use regular magnetic storage (tape/disc) or replaceable OTP PROMs? Or something completely different?

 

It's battery powered at least but I don't remember off the top of my head how it works. I think I have some more details about it somewhere but I'm not at home at the moment, will try to look it up tonight.

 

e: page 16 in this PDF:

När AJS 37 utformades var ett av målen att åstadkomma effektiv preparering för uppdrag samt registrering av parametrar från flygplanet. Verktyget blev datastav DS 37, till det yttre lik den till FR-JAS men med ett helt annat innehåll. Den var försedd med ett litet operativsystem och ett transparent filsystem och var en löstagbar del av avioniksystemet.

 

IIRC it has like 8MB of memory or something huge like that (well, huge for early 90's)


Edited by renhanxue
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We have a running joke on how quick someone would notice. :P

 

The serial number is as such as we used a photo of the Ja-37Di in Graz.

Same thing with the roundel, actually.

 

Both things are on the fixlist. ;)

 

Please don´t forget the wing-id below the canopy (7, 10 or 15)! :smilewink:

Student Pilot in 476th vFighter Group.

Callsign: Griffin

 

www.476vfightergroup.com

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I wasn't aware that the cartridge was introduced with the AJS; in that case there are loads of different modern(-ish) methods of data storage (like EEPROMs etc). I guess I'll have to dig deeper into the manuals and see what I can find.

 

Makes me think of the New Zealand Skyhawks who got something similar at around this time !

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Those geardoors for the nosewheel...shouldn't they be level with the ground instead of pointing down when the aircraft is running?

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Those geardoors for the nosewheel...shouldn't they be level with the ground instead of pointing down when the aircraft is running?

 

 

It seems to have a bit of a nose down attitude on the ground. Perhaps something related to

 

Struts are a little too stiff right now. smile.gif

 

(if there's an imbalance in the suspension parameters for the front and rear oleo struts)

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Nice video.:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

Aircrafts: F-16C | TF-51 | M2000C | F/A-18C | AV-8B | Viggen | KA-50 | A-10C | UH-1 | Mi-8 |

Maps: Caucasus | Persian Gulf | NTTR | Normandy | Syria

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Yes they should. It's probably on the to do list but it would be great if Cobra could chime in.

 

He aldready did, he said "the struts are to stiff at the moment". My guess from that is that the front and rear gear are not properly balanced because of improper stiffnes settings. :-)

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He aldready did, he said "the struts are to stiff at the moment". My guess from that is that the front and rear gear are not properly balanced because of improper stiffnes settings. :-)

 

I thought Mags was reffering to the gear doors being in a too vertical position instead of a more horizontal position, which they should be.

 

 

 

ws8q1Wr.jpg

 

scQbZUgBEmiJ.jpg

 

You can see that the landing gear doors do not look open enough in the Leatherneck video.

sgbUB


Edited by Agremont
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Agremont is right.

 

He said it better than me! :-)

 

Nevertheless I'm nitpicking although I'm sure LN knows about it.

I could be wrong though!

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The fuel indicator went up once the data was loaded from the data card to the computer, just after the code was entred. I assume that the data card also tells the computer the external stores configuration. Therfore, after loading data from the data card, the computer realized that the aircraft has the external fuel-tank attached.

Looked at the video again and it seems like you're referring to the striped hand on the fuel meter (popularly called slipsen or "the necktie" in Swedish - it's even referred to by that name in the flight manual). That's not the actual fuel fill level. The fuel fill level is indicated by the white hand that shows 100% in that scene (but later, after taxiing out, that hand has indeed moved up to 125%, indicating Cobra was being sneaky with his drop tank).

 

The necktie, on the other hand, shows your fuel reserve - if you fly the programmed waypoint route at the programmed speed, you will have the fuel amount shown by the necktie left when you land (or when you arrive in the landing pattern, don't remember which). That's why it jumped up when the data was loaded from the cartridge - a waypoint route for it to estimate fuel consumption from was loaded. It's a very handy bingo indicator.

 

IIRC if you don't program a landing base the computer will assume you want to return to the base you started from.


Edited by renhanxue
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