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How much do you use the rudder when you bank left or right?


skendzie
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When flying a plane, I have a pretty good feel about giving the plane some slight rudder left when banking left. But in a helicopter, I'm not sure I feel it's really necessary. The rudder allows for some crazy maneuvering you obviously can't accomplish in a plane. So on basic banking, should I be using the rudder?

 

On that thought, does anyone have any good resources to share about helicopter maneuvering? Seems like it'd be a helpful resource.

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Unfortunately I noticed that the turn coordinator in the UH-1H has marks for a 4' turn ( twice typical coordinated standard rate of 2', common on airliners, probably also on helicopters ... ) but, when I perform a coordinated turn of full 360º it doeasn't take anywhere near 4', nor 2'...

 

I believe the only flight simulator where I was ever able to fly perfect standard rate turns was ELITE :-/

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Unfortunately I noticed that the turn coordinator in the UH-1H has marks for a 4' turn ( twice typical coordinated standard rate of 2', common on airliners, probably also on helicopters ... ) but, when I perform a coordinated turn of full 360º it doeasn't take anywhere near 4', nor 2'...

 

I believe the only flight simulator where I was ever able to fly perfect standard rate turns was ELITE :-/

 

It's not easy for me to describe in english how the turn coordinator works, but I can say how real hely Pilots make a 2' turn... there is a easy rule: IAS/10 x 1,5 = bank angle

 

Es: IAS 100 Kts , bank angle 15 degrees - IAS 80 Kts, bank angle 12 degrees

 

Obviously it works only if you mantain the airspeed and a coordinate turn (ball or "slip indicator" on the center). You can check every 30" if your heading is 90 degrees on the left or on the right and correct your bank angle if your turn rate is too much fast or slow.


Edited by Hypnos

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  • 2 weeks later...

Always apply rudder if you want to make coordinated turns. Also, bear in mind that your rudder-cyclic-collective interplay / coordination differs depending on whether you're turning to left or right.

 

I've found that I rarery watch the indicator anymore, because looking out the window you can actually see if you're sideslipping! Besides, the Huey is a conventional helicopter and, as such, affected by gyroscopic forces which seem to throw the ball out of whack at times, making it less than reliable in judging your amount of slippage. So just use your Mk.I eyeball and watch how the scenery outside moves while you turn and you'll soon get the hang of it :thumbup:

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It depends on how you want to turn, where you want to turn and what speed you want to bleed.

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  • 2 weeks later...

As others have said, just keep the ball in the middle.

 

Having flown fixed wing for a while, when I transitioned to helo (RL), you have to reset your brain. Take a descending, decelerating left turn. In a fixed wing, you would still apply left rudder to counteract adverse yaw caused by the aileron. A right turn would require a little less right rudder due to p factor, slipstream, etc, but likely would still use some to counteract the drag of the aileron.

 

Now do the same descending, decelerating left turn in a helo. You are at a very low power setting, which is going to require considerable right pedal to maintain coordination. Because the helo doesn't suffer from adverse yaw caused by cyclic inputs, you don't need left pedal input to counteract it when you roll left. Therefore, you are now in a 30* left bank, with a boatload of right pedal. The first few times you do this will feel extremely weird! But that is what is necessary to keep the ball centered and maintain coordinated flight.

 

Trippy, isn't it?

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Trippy, isn't it?

 

It's exactly as you described. When I first flew the DCS Huey I was totally scoobied because of the bass-ackwards rudder usage; now that I've fallen in love with the MiG-15bis, I'm totally scoobied again because the rudder works RIGHT. :D

 

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