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Clarification?


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Look down at the barometric altimeter as you press those keys and you'll have your answer. :) That sets your barometric altimeter. There are a few reasons to pay attention to it. First, the baro pressure changes with the temp in LOMAC/FC's world. So if you don't adjust it for the changed air pressure, your baro altimeter will be off by that amount. Not too much of a problem unless you're approaching mountains in the clouds. Then an incorrect setting could be problematic.

 

The second reason is a bug. If you start on the runway your baro altimeter is always set to sea level, "0" meters. So it'd be wise to set it to the altitude of the airbase. Again, not too big a deal unless you're approaching mountains in the rain and fog. Most of LOMAC/FC's airbases are no more than 25 or so meters above sea level. So you'd be fairly safe anyway. But taking off from Maykop, for instance, you'd be flying 180 meters lower than you thought you were. And 210 meters lower on a really cold day.

 

BTW, those keys are just for the Su-25 and -25T.

 

Rich

YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU1...CR6IZ7crfdZxDg

 

_____

Win 10 Pro x64, ASUS Z97 Pro MoBo, Intel i7-4790K, EVGA GTX 970 4GB, HyperX Savage 16GB, Samsung 850 EVO 250 GB SSD, 2x Seagate Hybrid Drive 2TB Raid 0.

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Look down at the barometric altimeter as you press those keys and you'll have your answer. :) That sets your barometric altimeter. There are a few reasons to pay attention to it. First, the baro pressure changes with the temp in LOMAC/FC's world. So if you don't adjust it for the changed air pressure, your baro altimeter will be off by that amount. Not too much of a problem unless you're approaching mountains in the clouds. Then an incorrect setting could be problematic.

 

The second reason is a bug. If you start on the runway your baro altimeter is always set to sea level, "0" meters. So it'd be wise to set it to the altitude of the airbase. Again, not too big a deal unless you're approaching mountains in the rain and fog. Most of LOMAC/FC's airbases are no more than 25 or so meters above sea level. So you'd be fairly safe anyway. But taking off from Maykop, for instance, you'd be flying 180 meters lower than you thought you were. And 210 meters lower on a really cold day.

 

BTW, those keys are just for the Su-25 and -25T.

 

Rich

 

:o

 

Uh oh....I love doing blind landings in the Russian a/c....

 

Is the Russian ADI using barometric or radar based altitude data when guiding you in to land ?

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Why would this be a bug? I assume you know about QFE and QNH?

Though I know that in US/Can QFE is not as much used as is in europe & russia, but that's not a reason to call it a bug.

 

Or is it that I misunderstood your explanation.

 

 

Condor is one hell of a glider sim, I love it:) cheers...

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Guest EVIL-SCOTSMAN
Why would this be a bug? I assume you know about QFE and QNH?

Though I know that in US/Can QFE is not as much used as is in europe & russia, but that's not a reason to call it a bug.

 

Or is it that I misunderstood your explanation.

I think Ironhand meant that having it set to sea level on an airfield is a bug, if it was sealevel then there would be no airfield as it would be underwater.

 

it should be set to the airfields height, but it isnt really a bug, as you would have to change it manually in real life anyway, but he is meaning when you start on the runway, which by all rights, it should already be set for the airfields height if you start on the runway...

 

thats what i think he may of meant....

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:o

 

Uh oh....I love doing blind landings in the Russian a/c....

 

Is the Russian ADI using barometric or radar based altitude data when guiding you in to land ?

 

None I think... it's radio controled (like ILS)

Never forget that World War III was not Cold for most of us.

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Uh oh....I love doing blind landings in the Russian a/c....

 

Is the Russian ADI using barometric or radar based altitude data when guiding you in to land ?

The radar altimeter takes over under 1500 meters. But the ADI is using the ILS radio "beams" not the altimeter to guide you down, if I understand your question.

 

 

Why would this be a bug? I assume you know about QFE and QNH?

Though I know that in US/Can QFE is not as much used as is in europe & russia, but that's not a reason to call it a bug.

Your assumption would be wrong. :) QFE? QNH? Please explain. I love learning new things.

 

Or is it that I misunderstood your explanation.

What EVIL-SCOTSMAN said. Since you're ready for takeoff on the runway, it really ought to be set to the runway altitude. Perhaps "bug" isn't the proper term. An "inconsistency" might be a better way to describe it.

 

Rich

YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU1...CR6IZ7crfdZxDg

 

_____

Win 10 Pro x64, ASUS Z97 Pro MoBo, Intel i7-4790K, EVGA GTX 970 4GB, HyperX Savage 16GB, Samsung 850 EVO 250 GB SSD, 2x Seagate Hybrid Drive 2TB Raid 0.

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Not sure of the military procedure but I would guess that it would be similar to the civilian world, or you'd have everyone flying at different altitudes ;); First you'd check the local QNH and set your altimeter and ATC would also issue you with altimeter settings as you are passed from one controller to the next (tower, approach etc) while descending or climbing. However once you climb above the transition altitude, you would then set your altimeter to 1013MB or 2992 inches. The transition altitude in the US is 18000 and I think in Australia is 10000 but in Europe it varies. All of this is of course IFR flying but I would assume military aviation to follow something similar especially some kind of transition altitude that would be the same as civil aviation. The funny thing is I never knew you could set the altimeter for any aircraft in lockon..:confused:

 

Correct me if Im wrong;

 

QFE= is the pressure of the aerodrome.

QNH= mean sea level, reduced from QFE.

QFF= corrected pressure to mean sea level accounting for temperature.

Cozmo.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

Minimum effort, maximum satisfaction.

 

CDDS Tutorial Version 3. | Main Screen Mods.

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Ironhand, Goon already did the explanation and Cosmonaut expand it.

That's why I would say it is a feature not a bug. What's more practical to have? That's the whole different ball.

However as I mentioned in my post. It is not uncommon here over the pond, to have home base in QFE.

 

P.S. Airea, thx... I am glad to hear you are enjoying it :)

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Excuse me while I high jack this post a little ;) but (504)Goon, last post raises an interesting question. I wonder if the military use standard flight levels for Westbound and Eastbound flights for ingressing/egressing to/from a target area? .. or would they have a classified system that would run on a similar method used by civil pilots? It would also be interesting to know how this translated into Russian procedures in terms of choosing an altitude for your flight.

Cozmo.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

Minimum effort, maximum satisfaction.

 

CDDS Tutorial Version 3. | Main Screen Mods.

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I have absolutely no idea on how they do stuff elsewhere, all that i know is from my "home" airbase..:) To answer your question, yes, when they fly up high they use the east/west flight level system, but mostly they fly normal VFR to their targets and back home under 5000ft.. When they are out of their target/practise areas they must follow all civil flight rules exept one.. minimum altitude above non-populated areas.. "Clear of obstacles".. you can imagine how jelous i am about that!!:D

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Excuse me while I high jack this post a little ;) but (504)Goon, last post raises an interesting question. I wonder if the military use standard flight levels for Westbound and Eastbound flights for ingressing/egressing to/from a target area? .. or would they have a classified system that would run on a similar method used by civil pilots? It would also be interesting to know how this translated into Russian procedures in terms of choosing an altitude for your flight.

 

Not only that, but over Serbia NATO sometimes used standard civil routes in actuall war... got no idea why they would do such a thing.. but they did.

 

As for the question, afaik, target area is restricted airspace for civilian traffic and military can do what they want. When they exit that airspace, they must follow civil air rules.

 

Theres a joke about that..

Q: Who's got the right of way - a hot air balloon or a fully armed F-18?

(balloons always have right of way since it's a tad hard to steer in one ;))

A: What balloon? :D

Never forget that World War III was not Cold for most of us.

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Thx for the info (504)Goon & nscode..

 

Not only that, but over Serbia NATO sometimes used standard civil routes in actuall war... got no idea why they would do such a thing.. but they did.

 

 

I never would have expected them to use actual jet routes either and I understand what you're saying as well. Its obvious they wanted to ensure safe separation but why use standard routes .. seems a little predictable. However maybe that's exactly what they do in war time.. its more efficient to use an existing route thats already in place rather than create a new one for the majority of flights to and from the combat area. Once there then tactics would dictated altitude and then back to standard routes for the egress.

 

No way to fly routes in lockon but the next time I build a mission I'll experiment with standard altitudes for westbound and eastbound traffic... could add to the immersion.

Cozmo.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

Minimum effort, maximum satisfaction.

 

CDDS Tutorial Version 3. | Main Screen Mods.

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(504)Goon, Vati, Cosmonaut, nscode,

 

Thanks for the education. I wasn't aware of the interplay of the various barometric settings in flight. It'd be interesting to have this type of thing implimented (along with a lot of other coms, etc). I was vaguely aware of using "lanes" to and from target areas from something I read a number of years ago.

 

Rich

YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU1...CR6IZ7crfdZxDg

 

_____

Win 10 Pro x64, ASUS Z97 Pro MoBo, Intel i7-4790K, EVGA GTX 970 4GB, HyperX Savage 16GB, Samsung 850 EVO 250 GB SSD, 2x Seagate Hybrid Drive 2TB Raid 0.

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