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crosswind-landings


9.JG27 DavidRed
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hey guys!anybody managed to do proper crosswind landings already?i tried it, und up until touchdown everything is fine...once all three wheels are on the ground though, the plane starts to heavily head into the wind, no matter what i do...even full opposite break and rudder dont avoid that, and so i always come off the runway and crash eventually or at least spin around...i also tried to counter this behaviour with engaging noswheel steering directly after touch down, but its hard enough to do that after touch down without wind, and with crosswind, this seems to be really hard, if not to say too hard...besides i cant imagine real F86 pilots would engage nosewheel steering directly after touchdown anyways.....

 

in the mission i tried it, i set wind to 15m/s from 90° to the runway....after i failed every time, i reduced the wind to only 10m/s, but still with the same result....:(

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i know its 36kph, still i would assume that this shouldnt cause much if any trouble for a bird like the F86.

EDIT:meanwhile i managed to make a successfull crosswind landing at 10m/s from 90°, but still it feels wrong how bad the plane seems to nose into the wind once all three wheels are on the ground.


Edited by 9./JG27 DavidRed
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Your rudder is effective till 50 knots. Use it to keep directional control on the runway.

Do not use the wheel brakes let alone the nose wheel steering just right after touchdown,

For the whlee brakes wait till at least you are about 80 knots and use them gently. let the aircraft decelerate by itself on runway. The brakes of the Sabre are not as efficient as modern jets.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=101825&stc=1&d=1406544859

crosswind.jpg.105a1d287e2e9bc861a3902c42323f42.jpg

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Your rudder is effective till 50 knots. Use it to keep directional control on the runway.

Do not use the wheel brakes let alone the nose wheel steering just right after touchdown,

For the whlee brakes wait till at least you are about 80 knots and use them gently. let the aircraft decelerate by itself on runway. The brakes of the Sabre are not as efficient as modern jets.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=101825&stc=1&d=1406544859

 

have you tried that?even with full right rudder plus right brakes(because the rudder doesnt do anything) the plane will still head directly left off the runway, and that at only 15m/s.

i will keep trying, but rudder itself doesnt seem to be effective enough to keep the plane on the runway.

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even if that would work, i would need to hear it from an F86 pilot and probably not even then believe that they have done it that way in real life with a moderate wind of 15m/s.

 

David, 15m/s means 30 knot x-wind.... That's not moderate, which is 10-19 knot :-)

 

I have landed different aircraft (gliders up to 22m env) in moderate to strong x-wind IRL, and while some behave well to a stop, others are a nightmare to keep in the rw as soon as you loose rudder authority :-/

 

The f86 was used at FAP, so, I'll try to gather some info....

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Servus.

The flight manual talks about a limit of 25 knots that is 12.8 mters per second wind.

however the same manual recomend finding a different runway or airport if possible.

You are trying it at 15 mts per second that is outside of what the manual recommend.

 

The Sabre is not a "easy" aicraft to fly, needs a bit of practice.

 

25 knot direct crosswind is a challenge in any aircraft even for experienced pilots.

 

I suggest you start practicing with smaller crosswind components and keep increasing it once you are more confortable with the aircraft behaviour.

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