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Need some advise on landing


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Tried several landings, always bounces when touching down. I tried both 3 point and 2 point methods, still bounces. Another issue I have is when my speed drops below 150 IAS, my nose starts to pitch up and down, sometimes very voilent. Is there any trick to eliminate the nose pitching. Or should I maintain 150 until touchdown and then chop throttle and pitch up for a 3 pointer?

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The manual and training lessons suggest that you should touch down at around 100 mph IAS, while you should approach at 120-150.

Once you chop the throttle a few seconds before touch down, get into a 3-point attitude and wait until the plane settles on the ground.

 

I don't know about your pitch issue, though, I have never seen that happen to me.

 

After that, practice, practice and practice! (I still have issues with landing sometimes, especially with crosswinds, and end up bouncing)

The Mustang likes to bounce, so you have to make sure your vertical speed is as low as possible when you touch down.

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My landings aren't perfect or anything, but the best ones I've done are basically just trying to fly slow above therunway keep it up as long as possible until it just gently smoothly touches the runway

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You should approach at 120-130kts, when you reach threshold at few feet above surface, put throttle to idle, flare a little and when the IAS falls down to 90kts the plane will gently touch the ground by itself...

 

There is no trick for that, it is all about feeling your aircraft, FFB stick recomended :thumbup:


Edited by Suchacz
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What Suchacz said.

 

Not sure about pitching though, it shouldn't be excessive, actually if You're nicely trimmed for approach and keep Your grip steady, it shouldn't happen at all. Maybe adjusting input curves in Your joystick settings will help?

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I don't have a problem landing but I do have a problem with taking-off with a bomb and rocket load-out, it seems even with the 5 degree right input on the rudder once I began to lift the tail-wheel I start to bear to the right and when I correct with left rudder input I run or fly off the runway and crash. I must be doing something wrong because I can take-off perfectly with out the bombs and rockets. Any help will be welcome. TC

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Tried several landings, always bounces when touching down. I tried both 3 point and 2 point methods, still bounces. Another issue I have is when my speed drops below 150 IAS, my nose starts to pitch up and down, sometimes very voilent. Is there any trick to eliminate the nose pitching. Or should I maintain 150 until touchdown and then chop throttle and pitch up for a 3 pointer?

 

The pitching is probably because you are overdoing it with elevator control. Remember that any maneuver during final approach should be gentle (that includes throttle and rudder). Could it be that you are trying to compensate for the nose-down pitch that occurs as you deploy full flaps?

 

When it comes to landing, each pilot has his own preference on how to perform the approach, so you 'll probably get different responses in your questions.

 

My preference is to go on a semi-power stall approach, and trim the elevator continuously nose up on final, while adjusting the power,so that I can achieve about 700-800fpm vertical speed and chop the throttle almost a second before touchdown (sometimes i chop it after touchdown). This is a more controlled approach and smoother on touchdown, but has poorer forward visibility (it's similar to the method used in carrier landings) and requires you to configure you aircraft earlier in the descent for landing. It's also trickier in the case of a go around (nose up trim will cause the aircraft to stall on sudden power increase). With this method, once you are close to the touchdown speed (around 110 mph), the aircraft is with full flaps down and slightly nose up, throttle manipulation allows you to be in direct control of the rate of descent and not of the speed.

 

If you go in with the standard approach method, the higher speed on final allows you to be in a neutral or slightly nose-down pitch, which provides much better visibility of the runway, but you generally have to time your flare more precisely and tune it with the speed bleeding so that you won't stall or hit hard on the runway.

 

Regardless of what approach fits you best, for the bouncing, it all comes down to practice.

 

hope it helps

The three best things in life are a good landing, a good orgasm, and a good bowel movement. The night carrier landing is one of the few opportunities in life to experience all three at the same time.

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I have found for me, that it is easier to land with a little bit of power on. I can land almost completely bounce free when I do this. As just make it over the runway im at about 95mph, and I touchdown at 90. When I chop the throttle I always have a much rougher landing.

 

The Mustang just comes with time. It has little idiosyncrasies that once you understand and have a feel for, it really gets a lot of fun to fly.

 

 

Also for bomb and rocket take offs, I usually add one notch of flaps. And generally I don't like to gun the throttle on take off, ever. I know the manual says 3000 rpm and 61 manifold, however I will usually do 3000 rpm and something like 30 inches at start, and once im moving ill slowly add power to 45 inches. Seems to help keep the torque and p-factor effects down to a more controllable level. Also I have rudder pedals and found they are a huge help. I usually try to make very fast corrections, using a decent amount of control deflection. You cannot allow the nose to start wandering very far off the centerline, as it will it can be very difficult to recover I've found. I do quick rudder movements to immediatly counter anything. Say nose starts to wander left, I kick right rudder about 25% for a short period, then do left, and so on.

 

All of the stuff is just things that I have found to help. These probably arent the politically correct answers but it keeps me from blocking the runway :)

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Thanks for all the tips and advises. I believe my nose popping up and down issue is due to my elevator trim and control sensitivity. Would anyone mind sharing their elevator trim and pitch curves with me? I am not 2 familiar with this type of curve thing. I am using x52pro hotas and saitek flight rudder btw. Also I am using the thumb rotary on my throttle for elevator trim btw. If anyone has a good curve for that, I'll be more than happy to try it out on mine. Thanks.

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I have the same x52 and pedals as you. I do not have any curves set but I did reduce the throw for rudder trim...

 

The rotary knobs are extremely sensative, and will often cause the actual trim wheel in the aircraft to spasm around. Therefore I set the elevator trim and aileron to the hat switch, like the a10 has it.

 

For the rudder trim, i have it set to the smaller wheel. But i found that it was too sensitve, so i cut the throws in half. If i turn the thumb wheel all the way to the right, i will get only 5 degrees of rudder movemen to the right, and max 5 to the leftt. THis is okay because thats the max i will ever use, and only use it on take off. But even with the reduced sensitivity, it still spasms mildly in the cockpit, (but i cannot notice it in flight)..

 

 

My advice would be to move the elevator trim to a hat.

 

Like I mentioned earlier, i don't have any curves for the flight stick. Once you get comfortable, you will find that you can be plenty smooth without curves. THats just my opinion, i know some like curves, but I never have used them for any aircraft.

 

Hope this helps

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Best tip, especially if you're coming from a sim like IL2, is not to pull back on the stick when landing. Let the aircraft find the ground. The trick here is to get a feeling for where the ground is below your plane and finding a proper descent rate. No matter if you're doing 2 or 3 pointer.

 

Also, cut power only after you have touched down and sure that you're rolling down the runway. At 25 RPM I like to touch down with about 15-20" of MP.

 

Fast forward to 09:00 and observe stick and rudder movements on lower left:

 

 

 

If anyone has a good curve for that, I'll be more than happy to try it out on mine. Thanks.

 

You can reset all trim for landing (i.e. us none), but if doing this for the first time I'd recommend using 1-1.5° nose down (helped me to overcome the tendency of pulling back on the stick, a habit from IL2 days). Have it mapped to the key, both trim and reset to neutral.


Edited by T}{OR
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P8Z68 | 2500k @ 4.5 | GTX 1080Ti | 2x8 GB @ 1600 | TM Hog (extended 7cm) & MFG Crosswind (S/N 007) | TIR v5

WWII bomber formations | DCS P-51D: [TEST] TO distance / gross weight / temperature

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Best tip, especially if you're coming from a sim like IL2, is not to pull back on the stick when landing. Let the aircraft find the ground. The trick here is to get a feeling for where the ground is below your plane and finding a proper descent rate. No matter if you're doing 2 or 3 pointer.

 

Also, cut power only after you have touched down and sure that you're rolling down the runway. At 25 RPM I like to touch down with about 15-20" of MP.

 

Fast forward to 09:00 and observe stick and rudder movements on lower left:

 

 

 

You can reset all trim for landing (i.e. us none), but if doing this for the first time I'd recommend using 1-1.5° nose down (helped me to overcome the tendency of pulling back on the stick, a habit from IL2 days). Have it mapped to the key, both trim and reset to neutral.

 

Holy Crap very nice landing! (Man I suck)

LOL

"Pride is a poor substitute for intelligence."

RAMBO

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As was said in a previous post, there are many different ways to approach your landing in a Pony. So, for my two cents worth, here's how I do it.

 

Keep in mind that with the onset of power, the P-51 will want to twist. The Merlin is a huge engine and those four prop blades are big.

 

I make my approach high and fast, about 150 KIAS. About 15 seconds before the apron, I cut power and glide in. By the time I'm over the numbers, I'm around 120. I pull straight and level and wait for the speed to drop ever so slowly. Around 100, with no power on, I slightly nose up and stall onto a perfect three point. If I'm too high, I do bounce a bit, but I let her bounce as she wishes. Usually, I am at a couple feet about the pavement at the stall. No bounce.

 

Of course, this is a power off landing and, as such, when something happens to force a go-around, adding power will induce a lot of bank and twist. Just practice touch and go's to get the feel of going from windmilling to lots of torque. Look out your window when you add power. See what the Pony wants to do. Ease in the correction as you ease the power.

 

Hope this helps you find your way of landing. Since you are flying a great plane in a great study sim, you are a great pilot (if you're not yet, you WILL be soon! :)

The Hornet is best at killing things on the ground. Now, if we could just get a GAU-8 in the nose next to the AN/APG-65, a titanium tub around the pilot, and a couple of J-58 engines in the tail...

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When doing a normal approach, keep in mind that the P-51 is one of the only prop planes in the world where you DO NOT use 100% prop pitch for landing. Infact, keep it around 2600 RPM because if you need to add power for a go around, and you are at 100% pitch, the sheer power of the engine will cause you to bank left and crash because the Mustang does not have enough rudder authority to keep level.

 

You can also try a military low altitude break approach. Hard to explain but easy to pull off, and it works in every fixed wing fighter not just the Mustang.

 

-You want to come along paralell and off to the right of the runway slightly, about 300MPH, 2600RPM and make sure you are low to the ground.

-When your reach 1/3rd of the runway's length, bring the throttle to idle and leave the pitch lever where it is.

-Bank left and make a U turn whilst climbing until your are flying the opposite direction you started and at about 150MPH. You want to get as much altitude as you can. (Do not touch the power!)

-Drop the gear and flaps when the plane reaches 150

-Descend and turn left until you are flying above the runway in a landing configuration

-You want to start touching down at around the same point that you started your left turn in step 2

-fly low and slow above the runway and gently stall the aircraft onto the surface

-squeeze the brakes; slamming them on will cause you to flip

 

If you want a vid on how to do this, I'll make one because it is an extremely effective way to land military grade planes especially the older ones, and you don't even need to know the stall speeds etc.

 

*Note, it's better to not use any rudder trim for a landing in the Mustang, unless there is a crosswind or other factors that would require it (i.e, damaged plane)


Edited by Sceptre

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You can use 100% PP, I doubt the other late war birds will behave any different. The trick is to gradually increase power/throttle, don't just slam the thing wide open. One more reason not to cut power well before flaring IMO. Gives you more options if you have to go around.

 

Holy Crap very nice landing! (Man I suck)

LOL

 

Thank you. Practice makes perfect. :)

P8Z68 | 2500k @ 4.5 | GTX 1080Ti | 2x8 GB @ 1600 | TM Hog (extended 7cm) & MFG Crosswind (S/N 007) | TIR v5

WWII bomber formations | DCS P-51D: [TEST] TO distance / gross weight / temperature

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I have the same x52 and pedals as you. I do not have any curves set but I did reduce the throw for rudder trim...

 

The rotary knobs are extremely sensative, and will often cause the actual trim wheel in the aircraft to spasm around. Therefore I set the elevator trim and aileron to the hat switch, like the a10 has it.

 

For the rudder trim, i have it set to the smaller wheel. But i found that it was too sensitve, so i cut the throws in half. If i turn the thumb wheel all the way to the right, i will get only 5 degrees of rudder movemen to the right, and max 5 to the leftt. THis is okay because thats the max i will ever use, and only use it on take off. But even with the reduced sensitivity, it still spasms mildly in the cockpit, (but i cannot notice it in flight)..

 

 

My advice would be to move the elevator trim to a hat.

 

Like I mentioned earlier, i don't have any curves for the flight stick. Once you get comfortable, you will find that you can be plenty smooth without curves. THats just my opinion, i know some like curves, but I never have used them for any aircraft.

 

Hope this helps

 

Awesome. Thanks, this is what I am looking for. I'll try out your method. Just I got so used to rotary controlling trim, it would be hard for me to adjust. By cutting the throw, you mean put in a smaller saturation right? The default for both axis is 100.

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What buttons or wheels do you (anyone) use for your rpm control? I used 2 buttons back IL2 (1 increase the other decrease). But the mouse button on my throttle is not usable in DCS.(it's been bound to mouse). Anyway to decouple mouse key on my throttle with the actual mouse? I just want to use it as an ordinary button.

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Left throttle lever on TM Hog for power and right one for RPM. If you only have one throttle at your disposal, perhaps grabbing a throttle quadrant (Saitek or CH) would be a worthy investment on your end.

 

@T}{OR Nice two points landing. It's the real video tutorial.

 

Objasnio si, svaka čast!

 

Hvala. :)

P8Z68 | 2500k @ 4.5 | GTX 1080Ti | 2x8 GB @ 1600 | TM Hog (extended 7cm) & MFG Crosswind (S/N 007) | TIR v5

WWII bomber formations | DCS P-51D: [TEST] TO distance / gross weight / temperature

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