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New to P51 and some CEM questions


Pandacat
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Just got my p51. Coming from IL2 background, just want to learn more about CEM in P51. The manual says mil power is 3000rpm+61mp, but you only have 15min of it, but 2700rpm+46mp you can stay on forever. So during a dogfite, should I stay in Mx contiuous most of the time, only tap into mil or wep for brief seconds? Or should I stay in mil most of the time and go wep at tight spots? I figure most dogfights last only for seconds up to a few minutes. 15min is plenty for it. Also, in il-2, when you get engine overheat message, you can cut throttle and reduce rpm to cool it down and the timer gets reset and you can go crazy on wep and max rpm again. In DCS, there is no such thing as timer reset right? 5min is all that you can get once you take off, right?

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make sure you map your radiator and oil coolant toggles (left side canopy wall, just aft of throttle).

 

In my experience, I say you use the engine reference card in cockpit on the right side just below your canopy rail as a reference bible. Once i started referencing that card, I rarely blew engines... in fact i never blow engines anymore unless i take serious battle damage.

 

You won't get any overheat message in the mustang but you do have to watch your gauges - with those toggles mapped that i reference above, you should be able to cool it down back into the green when you need.

 

As for in a dogfight, WEP is really for those "hail mary" moments where you have no other options IMO. I run the plane max max and watch gauges closely - my first priority is to kill my threat - second priority is keeping my crew chief happy. Even with a rumbly, groaning engine, you can still get home if you manage your gauges.

 

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Thanks for the tips. Just another thing a bit off topic here. I had some trouble with my trims (mostly elevator trims). In Il2, I mapped it to my thumb rotary. I find it quicker for me to adjust trim settings in combat than HAT and it works pretty well. But in DCS, trim feels a bit different. It always lags a bit. Say I want 2 notches down trim, I push my rotary forward about 2 notches, but the game responded a sec later. It makes my plane nose always popping up and down in an unstable manner. Is there anybody else who had success of mapping elevator trim control to rotary instead of joystick HAT.

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It may be a bit tricky but you will get it eventually. Before entering a df, you need to check how hot your airplane is and then plan ahead what kind of maneuvers you will do. For example, you cant get into an energy fight without any speed/altitude advantage if your plane is very hot. You wont be able to wep all the way up if needed, your engine will blow up in the first climb. Once you understand it you won't worry about it too much and will focus in other things.

 

About trims, for me they work just the same. Look at the trim wheel in the cockpit while you fiddle with it, see if its moving correctly.

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Forget about timers and times... They are just a reference... there no sush thing as 15 min max at take off power...

 

This times are a general reference of how much time you have until your engine reaches max temps and fails.

 

But if the ambient temp its hot.. or you been doing close turns and high angle/low speed climbs.. your engine its going to be hot even if you are at max continuous power.

 

Your first.. indication of how much time you can have a certain amount of power its your temperatures of cylinder, Oil and coolant.

 

Forget everything you learn in Il-2 and welcome to DCS

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Forget about timers and times... They are just a reference...

 

This. The placard on the RH side of the cockpit is an excellent basepoint for power settings, but it is really only applicable if you keep your speed above 200 MPH. Drop into the 150-200 range, and you will need to fly with radiators full open to keep cool at max continuous. Drop below 150 for any length of time, and you will cook the engine if you try to go full power.

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Think of temperature and time like you would your car.

The handbook will tell you safe standard times and temps, but you rev the engine hard stuck in traffic on a hot day and she'll overheat pretty fast.

Do the same thing mid winter and you will get away with it.

 

In combat it's also more about controlling the pace than going flat out all the time - like a racing car braking and coming down the gears for a tight corner but accelerating hard on a straight. Full out all the time and they'd never make the bends.

Cheers

Stuntie

 

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I too cooked many engines and was just as frustrated when I made my jump from Il-2. I takes time to acclimate yourself to DCS P51 because ... rate of temp inc or dec = manifold pressure + prop pitch + maneuver. Once you get the feel for how these settings affect you engine temperature, you quit cooking engines. That's when the sim gets fun. ~S~

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My 2 cents for engine management :

 

-keep in mind that your throttle controls directly manifold pressure ONLY. There is no such thing as 100% or 90% power as in IL2. Always try to keep the MP below 61 inches (the red bar). If you exceed it, you can blow your engine up, even at normal temps. Remember that MP changes as your altitude changes (lessens at higher altitudes). WEP is not needed below 4000ft or so, because you can achieve the max MP without it anyway. WEP can become useful at higher altitudes, where you need all the MP you can get in a fight (and you still can't make it to 61 inches with throttle fully forward).

-Monitor your oil and coolant temps all the time and remember that temps are dependent on MP, RPM, rad settings and airspeed. Before a dogfight, I always open the rads manually at low-medium altitudes, and this takes some time in the P51 (it's not a single click for each radiator). If you see the temps rising above the limits, it is time to come back on the throttle and/or RPM a bit. Try to come back on the throttle when your airspeed drops significantly (i.e. at the peak of a zoom climb it drops to 120 mph or so and this causes the engine to overheat very quickly if the engine keeps running at max settings).

-Prior to the engine seizing from an overheat, you will hear a different engine sound. This has been modelled. Learn to identify it. If you hear it, come back on power ASAP and increase your airspeed.

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My 2 cents for engine management :

 

-keep in mind that your throttle controls directly manifold pressure ONLY. There is no such thing as 100% or 90% power as in IL2. Always try to keep the MP below 61 inches (the red bar). If you exceed it, you can blow your engine up, even at normal temps. Remember that MP changes as your altitude changes (lessens at higher altitudes). WEP is not needed below 4000ft or so, because you can achieve the max MP without it anyway. WEP can become useful at higher altitudes, where you need all the MP you can get in a fight (and you still can't make it to 61 inches with throttle fully forward).

-Monitor your oil and coolant temps all the time and remember that temps are dependent on MP, RPM, rad settings and airspeed. Before a dogfight, I always open the rads manually at low-medium altitudes, and this takes some time in the P51 (it's not a single click for each radiator). If you see the temps rising above the limits, it is time to come back on the throttle and/or RPM a bit. Try to come back on the throttle when your airspeed drops significantly (i.e. at the peak of a zoom climb it drops to 120 mph or so and this causes the engine to overheat very quickly if the engine keeps running at max settings).

-Prior to the engine seizing from an overheat, you will hear a different engine sound. This has been modelled. Learn to identify it. If you hear it, come back on power ASAP and increase your airspeed.

 

Thanks for the tips. There is a lot of good infromation here. However, some of you said are not entirely accurate. In IL2, if you play CSP planes such as p51, your throttle only controls mp. And your pp setting will not change your mp setting. They are distinct. However, in real life, as well as in DCS p51, they are somewhat linked. If you want to reduce speed, you decrease your rpm first, that will lead to temporary increase of mp. Also, the way rpm is portraited in il2 is not entirely correct. When you shallow climb or dive, your rpm changes as well. In DCS, shallow dives and climbs will not change your rpm because of csp governor.

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