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Old 10-12-2017, 03:05 AM   #1
Bunyap
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Default Daily Recaps for 23 Jun 1944 - 30 June 1944

The briefings for the upcoming Operation Charnwood P-51 campaign will include wording from these daily recaps from the RCAF overseas headquarters. The documentation used for building of the actual missions is, of course, several orders of magnitude more detailed (picture the detail seen in my 'Four Months in the Life' video series but extended to every squadron in Second Tactical Air Force) but these are very good summaries of events as seen from the ground as they happened.

These will make it into the 'Previous 24 Hours' and 'Enemy Air Intel' sections of the Operation Epsom briefings as well the next time we do an update but I will share them here first.

For reference:

- The player is part of the RAF's Second Tactical Air Force, or 2 TAF.

- A.E.A.F. or Allied Expeditionary Air Force, is made up of 2 TAF and the U.S. IX Air Force. They directly support the armies on the ground.

- The U.S. VIII Air Force consists of heavy bombers on strategic missions with fighters in support. They participate in Normandy operations upon request/direction.

- A.D.G.B., or Air Defense of Great Britain, previously known as RAF Fighter Command, sometimes supports Normandy operations.

- Bomber Command is the RAF's strategic bomber force but they occasionally support Normandy operations, as you will see big time in the Operation Charnwood campaign.

- 'DIVER' refers to V-1 flying bombs.

- 'NOBALL' refers to V-1 launch sites and support facilities.

- 'NEPTUNE' refers to Normandy landing operations.

- Combat results expressed as (3-1-1), for example, refer to enemy aircraft destroyed, probably destroyed, and damaged.



Dawn 23 June to Dawn 24 June 1944

Weather forced the cancellation of some portions of the program of the various air forces.

Eighth Air Force operated dispatching 408 Fortresses and Liberators and 362 fighter aircraft, which provided escort and support, as well as 185 fighter bombers. Five airfields, 13 NOBALL targets, 3 bridges and other targets were attacked. Seven bombers and 3 fighters were lost. There were no claims put forth.

A.E.A.F. attacks against NOBALL targets and fuel dumps were rendered abortive in some cases, and some of these operations were perforce cancelled due to weather. Ninth Air Force fighter bombers attacked the enemy transportation system from Paris, west and southwest to below the Loire. Many locomotives and much rolling stock was destroyed. Second Tactical Air Force put forth a considerable effort in armed recces, sweeping areas behind German lines from Avranches and Vire, and as far east as Evreux and Versailles. Typhoons and Mustangs attacked railway junctions and radar stations, headquarters buildings, the Mezidon marshaling yard and numerous smaller road and rail targets. The usual beachhead cover patrols were flown.

During hours of darkness, 2 TAF and A.D.G.B. dispatched Mosquitoes which attacked enemy movement and enemy air defenses. Standing, precautionary and low fighter cover patrol were flown over the beachhead during both day and night periods. Five enemy aircraft were claimed destroyed as a result of night interceptions.

Some 245 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar, 40 plus enemy aircraft operated defensively over areas of northern France, including the beachhead area, during daylight. A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted a total of 53 aircraft (Me 109s) plus about 72 Fw 190s over the Caen/Evreux/Lisieux/Dreux area. Several combats ensued. By night, some 39 enemy aircraft operated over Belgium and Holland, and in addition, minelaying was suspected in the NEPTUNE area. One enemy aircraft made landfall over Orfordness, and was intercepted and shot down at 0020 hours by a Mosquito of 25 Squadron. DIVER [V-1 Flying Bomb] activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 745
2 TAF: 1,029
IX Air Force: 1,114
Total: 2,888


Dawn 24 June to Dawn 25 June 1944

Weather was excellent over bases in England and generally very good in the various target areas. The greatest number of individual missions were scheduled this day, and very few of these were cancelled.

8th Air Force operated, dispatching 1,196 Fortresses and Liberators, escorted and supported by 700 fighters, which attacked one marshalling yard, eight airfields, eight NOBALL targets, two bridges and nine other targets. Fighters claim 32 aircraft destroyed and 7 damaged on the ground. Three bombers and one fighter are missing.

A.E.A.F. divided its attacks between NOBALLs, tactical targets, transportation facilities and defended localities at Cherbourg. Marauders, Bostons, Mitchells, attacked six NOBALLs, a bridge, and Marauders attacked four batteries in the Cherbourg area. Four fuel dumps were attacked by Bostons and Thunderbolts. Mitchells attacked two German military headquarters, Mustangs attacked a steel works and Typhoons a strongpoint at Cheux.

Thunderbolts (bomber) concentrated on rail and bridge targets in the enemy’s rear, as far east as Paris. Armed Recces which commenced with first light, covered the same region with emphasis on the Le Mans, Laval, Domfront areas. The usual defensive and beachhead patrols were flown.

During the hours of darkness 2 TAF and A.D.G.B. dispatched 74 Mosquitoes and 13 Mitchell (flare dropping) which attacked enemy movement and patrolled enemy airfields. Precautionary, standing and interception patrols were flown by Mosquitoes and Beaufighters of the A.D.G.B. Three enemy aircraft destroyed, one probable and one damaged are claimed by night and one mosquito of 418 R.C.A.F. Squadron is missing, but the crew or safe, as is the mosquito of 96 Squadron (crew also safe), and one of 264 Squadron.

A total of 392 enemy aircraft operated. Some 12 Me 109 attacked Spitfires over the beachhead between 0720 and 0929 hours and seven Fw 190 attacked P-47s over Beville during the same period. A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted 40 plus enemy aircraft (Fw 190/Me 109) in the Evreux area (1110/1309 hours) four enemy aircraft in the Domfront area (1418/1550 hours) 30 enemy aircraft north of Dreux (1355/1636 hours). One Me 109 which ventured over the beachhead area was destroyed. Some 26 enemy aircraft patrolled areas over northern France during the night period. DIVER activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 965
2 TAF: 1,252
IX Air Force: 1,937
Total: 4,154


Dawn 25 June to Dawn 26 June 1944

The pattern of the day’s aerial activity was substantially the same as the preceding day period. Weather was good during the early portions of the period, although as the day wore on, several operations ordered for the afternoon were postponed, but many of these were carried out in the early evening. This day was marked apart from others since D-Day by the scale and determined character of enemy air opposition.

VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 1,200 Fortresses and Liberators, escorted and supported by 673 fighters, which attacked six airfields, 19 NOBALLs, and two large supply dumps near Toulouse. Bridges in Northern France were also attacked. Fighter claims are 19-0-6 (air) and 4-0-3 (ground) for the loss of two fighters and 10 bombers.

A.E.A.F. carried out numerous armed recces over the whole tactical area. Mustangs attacked railways in the Chartres area, while Lightnings bombed seven key points on the line between Orleans and Paris. Typhoons destroyed a bridge at Elbouf. Marauders attacked the Mezidon Marshalling Yard, and Thunderbolts a bridge at St Sauveur. Bostons and Marauders attacked two fuel dumps with excellent results. Three NOBALLs were attacked in the evening and Thunderbolts attacked one radar station. During the course of these operations, large forces of enemy aircraft were encountered, and very determined interception was attempted by the enemy. Many enemy casualties are claimed.

During the hours of darkness, 2 TAF and A.D.G.B. dispatched 25 Mosquitoes, which attacked rail targets and road junctions. Beaufighters and Mosquitoes maintained beachhead, standing and interception patrols during the hours of darkness.

A total of 285 enemy aircraft operated. During the morning, IX Air Force aircraft encountered 100 plus enemy aircraft (Fw 190/Me 109) over Northern France. 2 TAF met 40 plus (same types) during the period, engagements resulting. In the afternoon, 2 TAF aircraft encountered 30 plus Me 109s near Caen, which decamped upon being attacked. Some 40 enemy aircraft (long range bombers) operated at night, suspected of mine laying. DIVER activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 621
2 TAF: 1,013
IX Air Force: 1,625
Total: 3,259


Dawn 26 June to Dawn 27 June 1944

Adverse weather conditions curtailed offensive operations.

VIII Air Force did not operate during this period.

A.E.A.F. dispatched several offensive sorties, chief among which was an attack by Mosquitoes late in the period on road and rail targets in the Villers/Aunay and Argenatn/Dreux areas. Spitfires and Mustangs flew armed recces over Caen/Falaise area between 0500 and 1100 hours. Thunderbolts attacked railway centers at Lens and west of Chartres. The usual defensive and beachhead patrols were flown.

2 TAF dispatched 21 Mosquitoes which attacked enemy movement during the night period. A.D.G.B.’s effort during the same period was mostly defensive.

Some 146 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar, 105 enemy aircraft were airborne on defensive patrols over wide areas of France and parts of Holland. 2 TAF Spitfires encounteded two formations of enemy aircraft in the Lisieux and Caen/Rouen areas. According to radar, only one enemy aircraft operated defensively during the night period. DIVER activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 327
2 TAF: 372
IX Air Force: 32
Total: 731


Dawn 27 June to Dawn 28 June 1944

Unfavorable weather continued to curtail offensive operations.

VIII Air Force operated, however, dispatching 186 bombers, escorted and supported by 182 fighters, and also dispatching 382 fighter bombers, which attacked five NOBALL targets, five airfields and one bridge target. Five Liberators and five fighters are missing. Fighter claims are 16-0-8.

A.E.A.F. medium and light bombers did not operate. Activity consisted chiefly of armed reconnaissance, with road, rail, bridges and enemy troop concentrations as the main objectives. These were carried out with considerable success by forces of Mustangs, Thunderbolts, and a small force of Typhoons and Lightnings, over the Coutances/Vire/Argentan/Dreux/Alencon and further south over the Rennes/Laval/Angers area. Thunderbolts attacked a fuel dump at Argentan and Spitfires a radar station at Cap Frehel. Spitfires of No 83 Group attacked gun positions southwest of Caen, troop movements and mechanized transport south of Caen and in the area east to Lisieux and Aunay/Falaise. These operations were in support of the British and Canadian (2nd Army) advance west of Caen.

During the night period, 2 TAF dispatched 20 Typhoons, which attacked a military HQ, and A.D.G.B. dispatched nine Mosqiuitoes and eight Spitfires on offensive patrols over enemy territory, as a result of which enemy aircraft claims of 3-0-0 were made.

A total of 138 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar, 81 enemy aircraft operated over Northern France, Belgium, and the Dutch Islands. A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted some 43 Fw 190s and seven Me 109s in the Caen/Mainville/Dreux/Cabourg areas. Several combats ensued. Some 81 enemy aircraft (long range bombers) operated over France, Belgium and Holland during the night period. Two enemy aircraft made landfall over the U.K. DIVER activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 918
2 TAF: 808
IX Air Force: 649
Total: 2,375


Dawn 28 June to Dawn 29 June 1944

Weather conditions militated against offensive operations, and many missions scheduled after 0900 hours were perforce canceled.

VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 992 bombers, 583 fighters, which attacked five airfields, three bridges, two marshaling yards and two other targets. Fighters claim 1-0-0 (air) and two bombers and two fighters are missing.

A.E.A.F. offensive operations were chiefly restricted to armed recces in support of ground forces. Railway facilities, roads, a Corps HQ, enemy mechanized transport, tank and troop concentrations were attacked by Thunderbolts, Mustangs, Lightnings and Typhoons. A small force of Typhoons and Mustangs attacked bridges at Mulrecy, Verson and Goupillere. Routine beachhead and convoy patrols were flown.

Night offensive patrols by A.D.G.B. were mainly uneventful. Standing, precautionary and interception patrols were flown.

Some 426 enemy aircraft operated. During the day period considerable enemy activity took place over the battle area, with Caen as the focal point. According to radar, some 82 enemy aircraft operated over Northern France and Normandy, but A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted 197 plus enemy aircraft over these same areas. Some 50 enemy aircraft operated in the Brussels/Chievres area in opposition to Bomber Command’s efforts. Numerous combats ensued. By night, 15 long range bomber enemy aircraft operated, and 61 defensive and one recce patrol were flown. DIVER activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 711
2 TAF: 904
IX Air Force: 304
Total: 1,919


Dawn 29 June to Dawn 30 June 1944

Improved weather conditions made possible increased aerial activity. This was reflected in all phases of the effort.

VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 1,150 Fortresses and Liberators, escorted and supported by 401 fighter aircraft, which attacked two marshalling yards, five airfields, and 13 other targets. Bombers claim 3-0-1 (air), fighters claim 34-0-9 (air) and 15-0-7 (ground) for the loss of 15 bombers and two fighters.

A.E.A.F. operations were chiefly in support of ground operations. Marauders attacked gun batteries in the Cap de la Hague area, and Bostons were on railway lines at Dol/Rennes and St Hillaire/Vitre. With an emphasis on armed reconnaissance, fighter bombers and fighters attacked railway junctions, railway rolling stock, mechanized transport, troop and armored concentrations over a wide area behind the Battle Area. Thunderbolts dive-bombed strongpoints in the St Lo/Beaumont area with good results. Routine beachhead and convoy patrols were flown.

During hours of darkness, 2 TAF dispatched 11 Mitchells (flare dropping) and 43 Mosquitoes, which attacked enemy movement. A.D.G.B. maintained standing, precautionary and interception patrols. Mosquitoes patrolled defensively over the beachhead during the night period.

Some 185 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar some 21 enemy aircraft operated over France during the morning, but A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted some 51 enemy aircraft during the same period. A further 23 enemy aircraft were encountered during the early evening. Only two enemy aircraft operated by night. DIVER activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 833
2 TAF: 1,209
IX Air Force: 1,379
Total: 3,421


Dawn 30 June to Dawn 01 July 1944

Weather conditions, poor, with 10/10ths cloud obscuring many target areas., prevailed throughout the earlier parts of the day. By 1400 hours, weather had improved to the point where large scale operations were possible.

VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 153 heavy bombers, 178 fighters (escort and support) and 322 fighter bombers, which attacked five airfields in Northern France, and miscellaneous targets of opportunity. Fighter claims are 3-3-4 (air) and 1-0-0 ground for the loss of one fighter and one bomber.

A.E.A.F. medium and light bombers attacked roads and rail junctions in the Thury Harcourt and Conde sur Noireau areas. Mosquitoes, Lightnings and Thunderbolts attacked Crartres and Verneuil marshalling yard, and road, railways and junctions in the Argantan/Dreux/Chartres/Alencon area. Mustangs and Typhoons attacked bridges on the River Orne. Bridge targets east of Paris were also attacked. Lightnings attacked raod and rail troop movements over a wide area (Moulins/Nevers/Bourges/Montargis and Dijon/Troyes). Routine beachhead and convoy patrols were flown.

2nd TAF did not operate during the night period, but A.D.G.B. dispatched two Mosquitoes on offensive patrols. Mosquitoes on standing/interception patrols over the beachhead destroyed one Ju 188.

A total of 242 enemy aircraft operated. With the massing of armor in the Caen/Lisieux area, enemy aerial activity increased somewhat. There was a strong reaction ti the IX Air Force attacks on marshalling yards and railway junctions. According to radar, some 22 enemy aircraft operated defensively, but A.E.A.F. aircraft encountered 70 Me 109s and 39 Fw 190s during the morning, afternoon and early evening. Numerous combats ensued. By night, roughly 100 enemy aircraft operated over Northern France, Holland and the Beachhead. Mine laying activities were suspected off the NEPTUNE area. DIVER activity continued.

Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations:
ADGB: 727
2 TAF: 1,073
IX Air Force: 1,375
Total: 3,175
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Old 10-12-2017, 12:23 PM   #2
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Look forward to it immensely!
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Old 10-13-2017, 10:36 PM   #3
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Awesome! Sorry if it's been covered elsewhere. Will we be able to use the spit for this campaign?
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Old 10-13-2017, 10:58 PM   #4
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No, the Charnwood campaign will be for the P-51 only. We will get back to the Spitfire eventually. There is a lot of war and a lot of aircraft to cover.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Also, reading the original post again, I wasn't too clear on what these covered. The recaps posted here are for the current Operation Epsom missions running from 24 June - 30 June. The Operation Charnwood campaign runs from 03 July - 10 July. The recaps for those dates are already integrated into the briefings.
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:41 PM   #5
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There was no VIII Air Force. There was an 8th Air Force. There was no IX Air Force. There was a 9th Air Force. There were 16 numbered Air Forces in WWII, NONE used roman numerals.

I think you are mixing it up with the 8th Air Force's subordinate headquarters, VIII Bomber Command and VIII Fighter command and IX Bomber Command and IX Fighter Command. They DID use Roman Numerals.

Keep it real, pard!
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Old 10-14-2017, 07:11 PM   #6
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This is transcribed from RCAF records.

Yep, I retired out of 9th AF HQ so I know the deal. There actually is a IX Air Force now but that is another situation altogether...
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Old 10-14-2017, 07:18 PM   #7
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That's cool. ;-)
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