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Old 10-27-2019, 09:24 PM   #11
Ramsay
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This is my understanding of the relationship between the required AoA and aircraft weight and speed.


Last edited by Ramsay; 10-28-2019 at 03:56 PM. Reason: Correct diagram terminology
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Old 10-28-2019, 02:51 AM   #12
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@Ramsay, with all respect for how spot on your analysis typically is, I don't know if I am a fan of that graphic as the coloration and some of the terminology seems misleading to me, but maybe I am missing the point...

Angle of attack is the difference between the chord line of wing (not necessarily the "aircraft nose / datum line" as shown by the graphic, since the chord line changes with the configuration of the wing) and the relative wind (aka direction of travel).

Now perhaps I am misinterpreting the diagram posted, but with the difference in red and green and their positions on the triangle shown, it seems to be implying that the angle of attack would be different for the two different weights. This is of course not the case; correct angle of attack, as indicated by the green donut of the indexer, is always the desired angle of attack -- in the diagram you show, that angular relationship (the triangle) would always be the same, regardless of speed. The required speed to meet that angle of attack in unaccelerated flight (aka a constant rate of descent) will change, but not the AoA. The diagram is correct in saying that a lighter weight will yield a slower approach and vice versa, but I think the colors might be misleading -- if I am the only one seeing it that way and everyone else just gets it, my apologies.

Regardless of all that, the entire point of resurrecting this thread was to answer RodB in post #6 -- and the answer remains; if a correctly functioning and configured F5 is on final with the green donut AoA indicator illuminated, the speed is correct for approach. That speed necessarily will be different as the aircraft loading changes, but it will be correct regardless. Fly the green donut and don't sweat IAS...
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Last edited by tom_19d; 10-28-2019 at 04:35 PM. Reason: Removed incorrect statement
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Old 10-28-2019, 04:43 AM   #13
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@Ramsay,
That diagram is perfect for understanding the AoA/speed relationship during the approach. Great work

@tom 19d
I don't what makes you think that the angles in these two triangles is different. In both triangles it is obvious that all three angles are identical.

I'm curious what atmospheric things would cause the approach speed to change?

'Fly the green donut and don't sweat IAS' is a bad advice because you should always crosscheck AoA and IAS.

Since you should always know the actual weight of your F-5 you should know the correct approach speed.

If the AoA vane gets stuck, sticky, bent etc. and you get a on-speed indication at e.g. 180kts at a noticable flatter attitude than usual, you should immediately realize that the AoA indication is incorrect.
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Old 10-28-2019, 10:32 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom_19d View Post
Angle of attack is the difference between the chord line of wing (not necessarily the "aircraft nose / datum line" as shown by the graphic, since the chord line changes with the configuration of the wing) and the relative wind (aka direction of travel).
Yeah, I struggled to find a non-technical description for the wing's chord, I've taken your feedback into account and adjusted the terminology to "wing chord".

I'm not sure how well goggle translate will handle it for non-English speakers but hopefully the diagram should be self explanatory.

Quote:
... perhaps I am misinterpreting the diagram posted, but with the difference in red and green and their positions on the triangle shown, it seems to be implying that the angle of attack would be different for the two different weights.
In my idealised diagram (CG%-MAC=15), On-speed AoA is the same for the two aircraft weights (the two triangles share a common direction of travel / hypotenuse).

Last edited by Ramsay; 10-28-2019 at 03:57 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 10-28-2019, 12:24 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramsay View Post
Yeah, I struggled to find a non-technical description for the wing's chord, I've taken your feedback into account and adjusted the terminology to "wing cord".
There's a typo in the updated diagram and the above text. Cord instead of chord. Makes it difficult to google
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Old 10-28-2019, 04:34 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbrz View Post
I'm curious what atmospheric things would cause the approach speed to change?
I could be a smart**s and say "manufacturer recommended speed increase for gusts" but you are of course correct, nothing atmospheric will change the required IAS, post above edited.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbrz View Post
'Fly the green donut and don't sweat IAS' is a bad advice because you should always crosscheck AoA and IAS.
In real life of course, but DCS doesn't model any damage to the AoA system that won't have an associated caution. That is why I specifically said "correctly functioning F5" in my post; I prefer to save my admittedly limited mental bandwidth to keep my head on a swivel and fly the donut. But, whatever floats your boat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramsay View Post
In my idealised diagram (CG%-MAC=15), On-speed AoA is the same for the two aircraft weights (the two triangles share a common direction of travel / hypotenuse).
Fair enough, I totally get what you are doing with the AoA and agree with your depiction, like I said something about it just tickles my brain wrong when I try to picture it from the perspective of someone just starting out with the concept -- maybe my thoughts are that someone could incorrectly association the red / green on the diagram with a red indexer. Obviously that would be incorrect, but just trying to see this from a different perspective. Regardless, like I said above, if I am the only moron with an issue, my apologies, so I will let it be. Thanks for the effort and the chord terminology change, cheers.
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Old 10-28-2019, 04:43 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom_19d View Post
In real life of course, but DCS doesn't model any damage to the AoA system that won't have an associated caution. That is why I specifically said "correctly functioning F5" in my post; I prefer to save my admittedly limited mental bandwidth to keep my head on a swivel and fly the donut.
Good and valid point.
I guess that almost 40 years of RW flying and countless proficiency checks prevent me from simply enjoying flying in DCS without constantly calculating something
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Old 10-28-2019, 04:57 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbrz View Post
I guess that almost 40 years of RW flying and countless proficiency checks prevent me from simply enjoying flying in DCS without constantly calculating something
Right on, right on.
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Old 10-28-2019, 09:13 PM   #19
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It's worth trying to fly on pitch/power using the altimeter as your ( sink rate ) instrument anyway, given how many times I've had to land a damaged aircraft with no avionics...
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Old 11-21-2019, 05:25 PM   #20
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As I stated in another thread, for those pilots with troubles on AoA -Speed - Attitud during approach, I highly recommend to spend time flying your Tiger on landing configuration. Fly it like a cessna. Learn to fly it on "slow flight".

Find the pitch/yoke back and throttle combitaion for the weight you have in that moment in order to keep flying at 200 Kias. Once you feel confortable flying in that condition, fly a traffic pattern and enter into downwind in "slow flight" configuration at 200 Kias.

Turn into final with 200 Kias and reduce your throttle a bit in order to lose altitude. Use your speed brakes to slow down to touchdown speed.

Once you feel confortable and you are ready to land, cut the throttle and maintain your pitch with a bit more of yoke back. Using speed brakes insted of reducing throttle is a good way to avoid lossing engine power when you probabily need it, ie: during bombing dive or landing, when you don't have enough time to wait for your turbojet to get it hight performance for a recovery or a missed approach.

Salute
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