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Old 09-07-2019, 10:51 AM   #91
Flamin_Squirrel
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Interesting, I assumed you'd need to be 'on-speed' with the bracket on final. Nice video.
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Old 09-07-2019, 12:58 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flamin_Squirrel View Post
Interesting, I assumed you'd need to be 'on-speed' with the bracket on final. Nice video.
http://www.185th.co.uk/files/Trainin...g_Tutorial.pdf

Two distinct techniques may be used when landing. One technique is to trim for approximately 11 degrees AOA and to fly that airspeed throughout the
final approach. Attitude/glidepath is controlled by the stick, and airspeed/AOA is controlled by the throttle. This technique allows better pitch control,
better over-the-nose visibility, and a more stable HUD presentation. In gusty wind conditions, the aircraft wallows less, and during the flare, the sink rate
is easier to control. The aircraft will float approximately 800-1200 feet from flare initiation to touchdown. Another technique is to trim for 13 degrees
AOA and to fly that airspeed throughout the final approach. The throttle is used primarily to control glidepath, and the stick controls airspeed through
control of AOA and direction through bank angle. This type of approach primarily allows better control of touchdown point and more efficient energy
dissipation; however, since the aircraft is already at 13 degrees AOA, the flare is more difficult, and care must be exercised to avoid scraping the
speedbrakes or landing firm. The aircraft will float approximately 500-700 feet from flare initiation to touchdown.
You might have noticed that I never talked about the AOA light to the side of the HUD. F-16 pilots rarely look at it. Don't worry about the fact
that the AOA light shows you fast (low AOA while on approach. That is normal. All that is important is that you are in the "green" at the
point where your tires touch the ground. The transition to "green" usually occurs during the flare. As far as airspeed is concerned, it is
generally only referenced during landing if there is a HUD failure or under certain AOA malfunctions.
It is highly recommended that you do not let your AOA while on approach increase beyond 11-12 degrees (unless you are doing short field
approaches). During the flare, the F4.0 program has a habit of allowing the pilot to increase beyond 13 degrees AOA much quicker than in the
real aircraft. For this reason, it is better to err on the safe side and keep the AOA at 11 units. You should figure out an approach to flaring that
will get you to 13 degrees AOA at the moment of touchdown. Be careful with the flare though. Since you are only transitioning from 11 to 13
degrees, it can hardly be called a flare. Don't overdo it.
Q1 landings should occur between 300 feet of the runway threshold and 1000 feet down. If you land beyond 1000 feet of the threshold you
should not pat yourself on the back. Keep practicing until you can land consistently in the Q1 area. Once you get good at landing it will be
possible to set down on the runway touchdown markers quite often.
Straight-in approaches are generally only flown in the real aircraft when weather is bad, when approaches are being practiced, under certain
emergencies, or while heavily weighed. Try doing overhead approaches. Try turning off of base and onto final while only a mile or two from the
runway threshold. This obviously requires more skill that a straight-in approach but it duplicates real F-16 landings to a higher degree. These
approaches can be difficult due to view restrictions imposed by your computer but they are certainly doable.
CONCERNING ILS APPROACHES: While an F-16 visual approach should have you landing 300-1000 feet down the runway, an ILS
approach will have you landing farther down. This is normal though. Accept the longer touchdown. Most pilots, if they break out of bad
weather early, will intercept the 2.5 degree glideslope and land visually. They will generally switch off the ILS to remove clutter from the HUD.
The following is taken from the military FLYING OPERATIONS: PILOT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES - F-16. While this specific
information does not have much practical value for helping you land the F-16, it does allow you to understand a little bit about real F-16 landing
procedure:
Approaches and Landings.
The desired touchdown point for a VFR approach is 500 feet from the threshold, or the glidepath interception point for a precision approach. When local
procedures or unique runway surface conditions require landing beyond a given point on the runway, the desired touchdown point will be ad usted
accordingly.
Final approach will normally be flown at 11 degrees AOA. Touchdown spacing behind an aircraft while flying a 13 degree approach will be a minimum
of 6,000 feet due to susceptibility of the aircraft to wake turbulence and speedbrake tail scrapes. Minimum pattern and touchdown spacing between
landing aircraft is 3,000 feet for similar aircraft (e.g. F-16 versus F-16), 6,000 feet for dissimilar aircraft (e.g. F-16 versus F-15 or as directed by
MAJCOM or the landing base, whichever is higher. When wake turbulence is expected due to calm winds or when landing with a light tail wind, spacing
should be increased.
To avoid possible speedbrake or nozzle damage, touch down either past a raised approach-end cable, or 500 feet prior to the cable. With centerline stores,
touchdown will normally be past an approach-end cable. Circumstances that may dictate landing prior to the cable include runway length, wind, runway
condition (wet or icy , gross weight, or an aircraft malfunction where full normal braking may not be available. Single-ship or formation landings with
centerline stores may be made across BAK-12 arrestment cables which have been modified with an 8-point tiedown system.
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Old 09-07-2019, 01:53 PM   #93
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Thanks for the info!
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Old 09-07-2019, 04:49 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dchriest View Post
I sure wish I could land them as well as Wags can. So smooth and perfect. I swear he's got to be cheating somehow!
No, I just made several landings and used my best one. Even then, it was rather sloppy:

1- Not holding G and altitude constant in the pitch out.
2- Was under G in the pitch out, and this led to me floating out and being offset too far from the runway in the downwind.

As you'll see, it takes practice and have to break Hornet landing habits.

Here are some real world reference videos:

https://youtu.be/JorI8EdSxW4?t=3470
https://youtu.be/a-wazTyhFJc?t=46
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qsib1KkCUr4
https://youtu.be/YNjbmboN4o8?t=3380

Last edited by Wags; 09-07-2019 at 04:55 PM.
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Old 09-07-2019, 06:19 PM   #95
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So i noticed i couldn't indentify the Gs on the HUD
Maybe an idea to explain the hud in a video too?
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Old 09-07-2019, 07:05 PM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timo144 View Post
So i noticed i couldn't indentify the Gs on the HUD
Maybe an idea to explain the hud in a video too?
Top left corner.
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Old 09-07-2019, 08:54 PM   #97
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I’m gonna have to actively remember to flare. Can’t just slam into the ground, like hornet.
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Old 09-08-2019, 12:20 AM   #98
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No vertical speed indication on the HUD, or am I missing it?
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Old 09-08-2019, 02:39 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wizard_03 View Post
I’m gonna have to actively remember to flare. Can’t just slam into the ground, like hornet.
Just be grateful we're not getting the Block 30. Landing gear and brakes on the 40's and 50's is way more robust compared to previous blocks. That being said, coming in with the nose up kinda like the Mirage (not quite as aggressively on AOA) you should be fine assuming you're on speed.
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Old 09-08-2019, 03:28 PM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Appleonastick View Post
http://www.185th.co.uk/files/Trainin...g_Tutorial.pdf

Two distinct techniques may be used when landing. One technique is to trim for approximately 11 degrees AOA and to fly that airspeed throughout the
final approach. Attitude/glidepath is controlled by the stick, and airspeed/AOA is controlled by the throttle. This technique allows better pitch control,
better over-the-nose visibility, and a more stable HUD presentation. In gusty wind conditions, the aircraft wallows less, and during the flare, the sink rate
is easier to control. The aircraft will float approximately 800-1200 feet from flare initiation to touchdown. Another technique is to trim for 13 degrees
AOA and to fly that airspeed throughout the final approach. The throttle is used primarily to control glidepath, and the stick controls airspeed through
control of AOA and direction through bank angle. This type of approach primarily allows better control of touchdown point and more efficient energy
dissipation; however, since the aircraft is already at 13 degrees AOA, the flare is more difficult, and care must be exercised to avoid scraping the
speedbrakes or landing firm. The aircraft will float approximately 500-700 feet from flare initiation to touchdown.
You might have noticed that I never talked about the AOA light to the side of the HUD. F-16 pilots rarely look at it. Don't worry about the fact
that the AOA light shows you fast (low AOA while on approach. That is normal. All that is important is that you are in the "green" at the
point where your tires touch the ground. The transition to "green" usually occurs during the flare. As far as airspeed is concerned, it is
generally only referenced during landing if there is a HUD failure or under certain AOA malfunctions.
It is highly recommended that you do not let your AOA while on approach increase beyond 11-12 degrees (unless you are doing short field
approaches). During the flare, the F4.0 program has a habit of allowing the pilot to increase beyond 13 degrees AOA much quicker than in the
real aircraft. For this reason, it is better to err on the safe side and keep the AOA at 11 units. You should figure out an approach to flaring that
will get you to 13 degrees AOA at the moment of touchdown. Be careful with the flare though. Since you are only transitioning from 11 to 13
degrees, it can hardly be called a flare. Don't overdo it.
Q1 landings should occur between 300 feet of the runway threshold and 1000 feet down. If you land beyond 1000 feet of the threshold you
should not pat yourself on the back. Keep practicing until you can land consistently in the Q1 area. Once you get good at landing it will be
possible to set down on the runway touchdown markers quite often.
Straight-in approaches are generally only flown in the real aircraft when weather is bad, when approaches are being practiced, under certain
emergencies, or while heavily weighed. Try doing overhead approaches. Try turning off of base and onto final while only a mile or two from the
runway threshold. This obviously requires more skill that a straight-in approach but it duplicates real F-16 landings to a higher degree. These
approaches can be difficult due to view restrictions imposed by your computer but they are certainly doable.
CONCERNING ILS APPROACHES: While an F-16 visual approach should have you landing 300-1000 feet down the runway, an ILS
approach will have you landing farther down. This is normal though. Accept the longer touchdown. Most pilots, if they break out of bad
weather early, will intercept the 2.5 degree glideslope and land visually. They will generally switch off the ILS to remove clutter from the HUD.
The following is taken from the military FLYING OPERATIONS: PILOT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES - F-16. While this specific
information does not have much practical value for helping you land the F-16, it does allow you to understand a little bit about real F-16 landing
procedure:
Approaches and Landings.
The desired touchdown point for a VFR approach is 500 feet from the threshold, or the glidepath interception point for a precision approach. When local
procedures or unique runway surface conditions require landing beyond a given point on the runway, the desired touchdown point will be ad usted
accordingly.
Final approach will normally be flown at 11 degrees AOA. Touchdown spacing behind an aircraft while flying a 13 degree approach will be a minimum
of 6,000 feet due to susceptibility of the aircraft to wake turbulence and speedbrake tail scrapes. Minimum pattern and touchdown spacing between
landing aircraft is 3,000 feet for similar aircraft (e.g. F-16 versus F-16), 6,000 feet for dissimilar aircraft (e.g. F-16 versus F-15 or as directed by
MAJCOM or the landing base, whichever is higher. When wake turbulence is expected due to calm winds or when landing with a light tail wind, spacing
should be increased.
To avoid possible speedbrake or nozzle damage, touch down either past a raised approach-end cable, or 500 feet prior to the cable. With centerline stores,
touchdown will normally be past an approach-end cable. Circumstances that may dictate landing prior to the cable include runway length, wind, runway
condition (wet or icy , gross weight, or an aircraft malfunction where full normal braking may not be available. Single-ship or formation landings with
centerline stores may be made across BAK-12 arrestment cables which have been modified with an 8-point tiedown system.
nice one
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