Why is there no real adverse yaw? - Page 3 - ED Forums
 


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Old 06-20-2019, 06:39 AM   #21
MadCat1381
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I notice the adverse yaw effect every time in the warbirds when I'm turning from the downwind leg into the final approach. Add aileron with no rudder and the nose rises quite alot (especially in the Spit). First thing the plane does is climbing, before it settles into the descent, which caught me of guard the first few times.
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Old 06-28-2019, 06:16 PM   #22
mkiii
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MadCat1381: As I mentioned - in my little unscientific test - this was due to (me at least) naturally easing the stick back as I turned. Note I tried NOT holding the stick & it did not happen. However - i don't see how using arrow keys as suggested previously proves anything - all that does for me is initiate a sudden 100% left or right roll movement.

@DD Fenrir: Nope - When I say nose drop or otherwise, I'm referring to it's relation to the horizon Yaw - not pitch. I'm still a bit confused as to the contention that it only happens at full aileron deflection - If I do that, then I'm not turning, I'm in a continuous roll.

Anyhoo - MkIII over & out. Clearly some people think they experience it, and others do not. Maybe some of us are so ham-fisted that we can't see subtleties
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Old 06-28-2019, 08:08 PM   #23
DD_Fenrir
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkiii View Post
@DD Fenrir: Nope - When I say nose drop or otherwise, I'm referring to it's relation to the horizon Yaw - not pitch. I'm still a bit confused as to the contention that it only happens at full aileron deflection - If I do that, then I'm not turning, I'm in a continuous roll.
You'll get some adverse yaw in a turn as the outboard wing is going faster than the inboard wing ergo you'll have a lift differential and by default an induced drag differential, however, the rolling at high stick deflections will give you the most pronounced adverse yaw - particularly in the Spitty - because of the much larger lift differential plus the fact that the Frise ailerons are less effective at equalizing the drag at these amplitudes of displacement.
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Old 10-04-2019, 07:15 PM   #24
freemind_fly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfstriked View Post
Been looking this up and for example frise type ailerons were used on spitfire.Basically the aileron hinge protrudes downwards to balance the drag.
https://ww2aircraft.net/forum/attach...se-jpg.360662/


P-51 though doesn't seem to have this from what I gather online.In game model has normal ailerons also.So maybe its missing in P-51? I do love adverse yaw effects and feel it adds a bunch to the fun of flight is why I am asking.
I think the same. Its a bit odd that the P-51 does only show minor effects of it with such a powerful engine.
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Old 10-05-2019, 06:48 AM   #25
grafspee
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BTW, I would not be angry,when ED would put Cesna 172 in DCS hehe
Lots of ppl could compare FM to real cesnas, this mayby would stop complains about not right FMs

Last edited by grafspee; 10-05-2019 at 06:52 AM.
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Old 10-05-2019, 10:31 AM   #26
freemind_fly
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Originally Posted by grafspee View Post
BTW, I would not be angry,when ED would put Cesna 172 in DCS hehe
Lots of ppl could compare FM to real cesnas, this mayby would stop complains about not right FMs
Totally agree!
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Old 10-23-2019, 03:12 AM   #27
streakeagle
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Bring an unslatted version of the F-4 Phantom to DCS World if you want to experience adverse yaw. At high AoA, you can't use ailerons to roll, or you will depart controlled flight with a high probability of going into a non-recoverable flat spin. Only the rudder can be used to roll at high AoA.

The slatted versions of the F-4, such as the F-4E Belsimtek is supposed to model, greatly improved the F-4's behavior at high angles of attack. So you can safely pull much higher AoA without risk of departing and get much better sustained and instantaneous turn performance, too. But nothing is free in aerodynamics. The slats increase zero lift drag, which reduces top speed, acceleration, and climb performance.
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