Help with Handling the Spitfire Mk IX (25 Feb was one of the worst days of my...) - Page 7 - ED Forums
 


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Old 04-09-2017, 07:34 PM   #61
DD_Fenrir
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Originally Posted by imacken View Post
Thank you all for your time and advice. It is appreciated. I have read and tried to take in all the advice offered here. This forum is so impressive!
There is progress. I think I know what I need to do to make a good landing. I still don't manage it every time, but more regularly than before!
That's good to hear mate, a lot of this is practise, the constant refining of your technique is just part of the DCS experience and we all were humbled at first by the skittishness of our dear old Spitty.

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What is odd though, I find I can pretty much manage a drama-free landing almost every time using the 'brakes pre-load' method. I have shied away from using this in the part, as it seems like a cheat. Why does this work so well for some people.
No real pilot would do this as it a) presents a risk of nose over and b) would provide massive wear on the brakes; the point of doing it is to give your corrective actions more instantaneous 'bite' thus allowing greater directional controllability during the landing phase than relying on rudder action alone. However it can be done and done so repeatedly without brakes to the point that in zero wind conditions it is possible to land and come to a stop without requiring any brakes whatsoever.


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Originally Posted by imacken View Post
Another question, what exactly is 'perfectly trimmed' in terms of landing? I have always tried to trim so that I could almost take my hand of the stick, and the plane would fly on any given path. Is that correct?
Yes. You trim to relieve pressure on the controls at a particular power/speed combination that is desired, that's when you can fly 'hands off', so you are doing it right. Just be wary of flying by trim which is regarded as poor airmanship.
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Old 04-09-2017, 08:35 PM   #62
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Another question, what exactly is 'perfectly trimmed' in terms of landing? I have always tried to trim so that I could almost take my hand of the stick, and the plane would fly on any given path. Is that correct?
I trim the rudder as best I can for straight ahead.
I trim the elevator and adjust throttle when I am close on approach for a speed of around 90 and sink rate around 2-3 marks down.
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