ESSAY, PART 3: Landing and stopping. - Page 3 - ED Forums
 


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Old 01-17-2017, 06:58 AM   #21
Kvoria
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Thanks so much!

Landing the Spit is like trying to land a unicycle on a trampoline!
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Old 04-01-2017, 07:32 AM   #22
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Your essays have really helped me a lot in handling the Spitfire, thank you so much for taking the time to write these.

I always blamed the sim for my screw-ups , but learning the theory behind it was a real eye opener
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:18 AM   #23
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When you guys fly the pattern do you try and do power off approaches/landings?

Was/is that something war bird guys do?

Just curious if thats part of operating procedure with a warbird?
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Old 08-13-2017, 10:35 AM   #24
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You mean dead stick approaches ?

They can be done - not that difficult. Biggest problem is that right after landing, without the aid of some propwash, you'll have propblems keeping the aircraft in the rw...

It's just like landing in a glider in a windy day, on a narrow airstrip...
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:54 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnakeBT6 View Post
When you guys fly the pattern do you try and do power off approaches/landings?

Was/is that something war bird guys do?

Just curious if thats part of operating procedure with a warbird?
Where power-off approaches are perfectly possible, it is not necessarily best practice! Maintenance of an approach power setting during the approach in all aircraft (except gliders) is determined by the level of both form and induced drag in the landing configuration. Maintenance of the correct power setting to over come the drag in turn has a stabilising effect on the aircraft through increased airflow over the wing inboard section, vertical and horizontal stabilisers - always a good thing in an aircraft which is slightly unstable in the lateral sense. Other benefits include engine warming and importantly, engine mass momentum is maintained, meaning power is available much quicker on demand during a go-around or baulked landing.

Of course, it's good airmanship to practice simulated power-off landings regularly enough to maintain your proficiency as a pilot, should a real engine failure occur necessitating a forced landing. The best way to practice this is to position yourself over your chosen landing site at approximately 2-3000', then fly a descending turning pattern down to your base leg, (a bit like a wide slow spiral) maintaining a constant sight-line angle (CSA) to your intended touchdown point on the runway. CSA means that as you turn and descend to position for a base leg/final, you are gradually reducing your lateral distance from the touchdown point, and therefore, as you descend, your sight-line down to the touchdown point remains constant (not steeper or shallower) as you descend. Aim to be turning final just outside the boundary at the approach end at about 600' (ish). Don't try to stretch your glide, and make a point of lowering the nose by 10 degrees or so as you turn final to keep your speed constant and to avoid increasing your alpha.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:47 PM   #26
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But I still find the DCS Spitfire too sensible on landings, if you bounce even just a bit... If you do not touch at the absolute perfect speed ( GS ) you're done - at least I am...

Too sensible imh...
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Old 08-14-2017, 01:50 AM   #27
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Thanks for the responses

I actually read where Bud Anderson said he could power off with a Spitfire and was curious about it...He was talking about how he got washed out of the Spitfire program for going out and getting drunk and coming back late for duty or something like that LOL.

I practiced last night like you would with a 172 etc.. at 1K Ft in the pattern and reduced RPM and Throttle in the pattern aligned with the runways end and was able to land quite successfully.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:22 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnakeBT6 View Post
When you guys fly the pattern do you try and do power off approaches/landings?

Was/is that something war bird guys do?

Just curious if thats part of operating procedure with a warbird?
If you are going to join multiplayer and take it half serious or just fight the AI in the sim offline, then you better lean to land deadstick in paddock

At least you walked away with some dignity, without bailing out.

Nothing like a few good machine gun rounds or autocannon fire to ruin your day It's Bad enough flying and landing these types of aircraft proficient without crashing.


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Old 08-20-2017, 10:52 PM   #29
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I did a nice landing on an aircraft carrier right at the second attempt.

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Old 09-27-2017, 11:00 PM   #30
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Is it ok to use the cockpit baffles as guide to staying on centerline or thereof? I mean the runway visible parts on your right and left, being in peripheral vision, is it normal practice?

Can I open the side door?
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