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Andrew8604

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Everything posted by Andrew8604

  1. I'm for the A-6 Intruder! But you guys deserve your Tornado, too. So many planes. Not enough developers. :( I think the planes should be developed in concert with Terrains, though. I think it would be beneficial for all the 3rd party developers. For instance, a Korea Terrain circa 1952. Along with that development should be development of an F9F-2 Panther, F2H-2 Banshee, F4U-4 Corsair, AD-4 Skyraider and HO3S-1 helicopter...as well as 3 classes of aircraft carrier, or at least the straight-deck Essex class carrier. That would take care of the US Navy side. On the USAF side, maybe the F-86A or E, F-80C, A-26 Invader, B-29 Superfortress. That's a lot of aircraft, but their systems should be simpler, maybe that would speed up development. Maybe also, Yak-3U, Yak-9 and Yak-11 fighters. But need a much better AI that might have to run on a 2nd computer, and provide dynamic weather. Another major terrain needs to be Vietnam. Which would be a very large terrain to include most of Thailand and Laos. And the various aircraft associated with it. More models of more complex aircraft here. It might be a 5-year project. But the A-6A can be in it. I think this would be better than having a scattering of really cool aircraft that never operated together in a theater.
  2. Not sure if everyone would catch it...T160 Revolving cannon is a revolver cannon. Yes, similar to a revolver pistol. A 5-chamber cylinder rotates and brings live cartridges into alignment with the single barrel for firing. Simultaneously, loading a preceding empty chamber with another live round and extracting a spent case from a succeeding chamber and ejecting it. The rounds were fired electrically and the rate of fire was 1500 rounds-per-minute. The T160 was developed into the M39 in about 1954. The F-86H was equipped with four of these cannons, so too was the F-100 Super Sabre and F-101A & C Voodoo. So, if it worked out this way in practice, the four M39's in an F-86H or F-100 would put out the same RoF as an M61 Vulcan, but probably weighed more than the M61. The F-5E we have in DCS carries two of these cannon in the M39A2 version, developed in 1964. [source: WikiVisually.com, Wikipedia.com, and others]
  3. My choice would be both: The F4U-1D and the F4U-4. I'd buy both of them. Actually, there's a movie some of you might have seen called "Bridges at Toko-Ri". Take all the aircraft from that movie and make modules for them and a 1951 Korea Map. And include the straight-deck Essex-class carriers with appropriate class light cruiser and destroyer (DD) escorts. That would be the F9F-5 (or -2) Panther, the AD-2 (or -4) Skyraider, the F4U-4 Corsair and the HO3S-1 rescue helicopter. Also, include a Commencement Bay-class escort carrier.
  4. Yes, SA-2..I agree. I was surprised the SA-2 wouldn't already have been included. Also, where's the Soviet 37mm, 57mm, 85mm and 100mm AA guns?
  5. Yet one more fan of the A-4 checking in here. I've been wishing for a simulation of this aircraft since the 1980's. It's been a long wait. The videos I've seen on YouTube look impressive. This aircraft has not been released to the public yet, right? I can't find any place to download it. I'd love to test it and provide feedback. If it became a full licensed product in DCS, I'd buy it for sure. Even at $70. I'd buy a 1960's Southeast Asia Terrain, too (although that's quite a large area). And hopefully an Essex-class carrier with angled deck would go with it. :) Sumner, Gearing, Sherman and Farragut-class destroyers would be nice, too, as escorts.
  6. Commanded wingman F-5E-3 to RTB. Wingman AI dropped altitude to around 10,000' or lower and used afterburner until out of fuel and then announced "ejecting" just 10 miles from airport! If afterburner had not been used foolishly, aircraft would have made it back to base with plenty of fuel to spare. Here's my suggestions: When using F2-key to view aircraft, the aircraft's ground speed and indicated airspeed should be shown. Also, show altitude, amount of fuel remaining and ammo remaining. AI needs to know how to fly the aircraft nominally. RTB should always be flown: 1. direct to base unless route is specified. 2. At optimal altitude, unless missile threat is present. 3. At optimal speed with very limited use of afterburner. Additionally, AI should climb their aircraft at nominal climb speed (KIAS) for given altitude: For example, most turbojet aircraft will climb at military thrust setting at about 300 KIAS until reaching Mach 0.7 (about 19,000' MSL) and then climb at Mach 0.7 to cruising altitude. Aircraft weight will determine rate of climb and cruising altitude attainable. Afterburner will be limited to use for takeoff and acceleration to 300 KIAS. AI needs to know how to approach airport and land. AI ATC needs to know how to vector aircraft to initial point for approach to landing. If visual approach is possible (pilot to report airport in sight from 10nm), ATC AI should vector aircraft to point along landing runway centerline, 10nm from end of runway at 10,000' above airport elevation. Aircraft will then turn to align with runway and begin a dive at 450 KIAS to reach 2000' above airport elevation above approach end of runway. Aircraft will then make a left break turn, decelerating and descending to pattern altitude (1500' AGL), lowering gear and flaps upon reaching appropriate speed. Aircraft will then fly a normal military pattern to landing. In a multiple aircraft formation, the formation will be right echelon with each successive wingman breaking at 2-second intervals to achieve a 1-mile-in-trail spacing in the landing pattern. Up to flights of 4 can enter the overhead approach. Successive flights of 4 should be spaced 5 miles in trail on approach. If a visual approach is not possible due to clouds, ATC will vector aircraft in pairs for precision instrument approaches, 3 to 5 miles in trail.
  7. Vietnam Map: I'm for it. From late 1960's. Cover the area from 10 N to 23 N Latitude (about 777nm) and from 99 E to 110 E Longitude (about 650nm). That covers most of Thailand, all of Vietnam and the Gulf of Tonkin. A large variety of aircraft were used in this era. The F-5E, UH-1 and MiG-21 are already made (though, it should be the MiG-21F). There have been several books written describing in detail the F-105D Thunderchief missions from Thailand to North Vietnam. Of course, most people would want the F-4 PhantomII (B, C, D, E & J versions). The A-4E Skyhawk was another important aircraft of this era. Additionally, the A-6A Intruder, A-7B CorsairII, and F-100D strike aircraft were important. Add the A-1 Skyraider and HH-3 and you have a pretty good variety. Of course, the MiG-17 and 19 should be added. Add anti-aircraft artillery of 37mm, 57mm, 85mm, 100mm and 120mm. Make them visually aimed by default or linked to search and tracking radar sites. And add the SA-2 missile and its radars and that should make a very challenging map/missions/campaigns. Also include the Essex-class aircraft carrier Oriskany and escort ships.
  8. Are one or both throttle levers hovering just above the idle position, even though they seem physically all the way back? I have a GoFlight Throttle Quadrant -- okay, it's meant for airliners, but it works. I set two levers for the throttles. I also have a CH Throttle Quadrant connected (kind of a hodge-podge of joystick levers and stuff). I use the 'joystick button' paddle-switches on the CH TQ. Anyway, I too, noticed one of the engines would not shut down when I hit the "throttle off" button for it. The other shut down. The one throttle lever is floating just a bit above idle. That seems to keep the button from working. So I hold that throttle lever down with a finger (seems to get it to that 'idle' position, then) and press the 'throttle off' button and hold it until the visual cockpit throttle lever moves to off. Also seems that if I hit the throttle off joystick buttons too fast (not long enough - less than a 1/4-sec, maybe) it doesn't work. (I could be wrong on that, have to test it again). My work around was to hold it for a second. BTW, I'm guessing that on the real F-5, if you slam the throttle levers back hard, it might 'bounce' over the idle/off gates and to shut-off. I've read of that happening to an A-6A Intruder driver (but that was the fictitious "Flight of the Intruder" story--still, I bet that part was based on it actually happening to some...in combat!!). Otherwise, you have to lift the throttle lifts to pass the idle gates to the off position, as shown visually in this simulation. Since no one makes real F-5 throttle lever hardware for Windows PCs, we have the joystick buttons or keyboard keys to emulate it. Imagine, you're over enemy territory, at night, and evading a SAM after momentarily 'popping up' above 500' AGL to maybe 1500'. In the excitement you slam the throttles back to perform a dive...and right past idle to shut-off. And the ground is dark, black--you can't visually see how high you are...Yikes!
  9. Rather than just say "issue solved", you should give a short description of how it was solved. What solved it? A patch? Technique? I have never had the problem. That doesn't mean it doesn't happen to others. But I've been doing this: 1. Weight: I've taken off with a Mk-84, two Mk-83's and two M-117's...about 90+% load (about 20,500 lbs, I think). I used the long runway at Creech AFB (Nevada TTR), and was into a 10-knot (5 m/s) wind. Field Elev.: 3131 ft. Temp. +20 C. 2. Flaps: FULL 3. Nose Strut: EXTENDED (This makes a big difference) 4. Wheel brakes: ON 5. Speed brakes: RETRACTED 6. Pitch Damper: ON (Seems easier to control nose rotation with this on -- although, it may be the case that this only has affect above 250 kts or so) 7. Throttle: About MIL power 8. Wheel Brakes: Held until engines spool up past 80-90%, then brakes released. 9. Throttle: MAX (AB on) 10. At about 145-155 kts: Start pulling stick aft, and keep it coming aft until nose lifts. (I don't just hold it full aft) When nose starts lifting, it will come up quickly. Then back off the stick a good bit to avoid over rotating and striking the tail on the ground. But keep the nose up -- top of instrument panel up to the horizon...somewhere around there. And the plane gets airborne. 8. When sure of being airborne or positive rate of climb, raise the gear...and then I go to FLAPS: AUTO Once the nose rotates, it all happens pretty quickly. Hope this is of some help. But I realize some of you may be doing all of this and still have the problem...then it's a mystery.
  10. What ground servicing equipment is required for the F-5E? Start cart? Does a single cart provide both electrical power and engine starting air? Whatever equipment is needed, can it be shown around the F-5E? Although, it would need to be placed clear of the aircraft so it could taxi without the equipment needing to be moved. And don't want it to be placed where other equipment might already be. Can hoses and cables be shown on the ground and connected to the aircraft when they are connected, and laying to the side of the aircraft or stowed on the starting equipment when not connected? This way, a look to the side might confirm ground equipment is disconnected before you start taxiing the aircraft. Same with fuel truck and/or fueling hose. Presently, refueling and reload takes a fairly short amount of time, I think. The pit crews at the Indy 500 (or other automobile races) aren't much faster. :smilewink: But those pit crews don't have to attach things like 500-lb bombs to bomb racks and safety-wire their fuses so they won't blow up the plane they are attached to. But for game play, or those with limited time, waiting so long for loading/refueling can be a problem. How about an option to choose "Fast Re-arm/Refuel" or "Realistic Re-arm/Refuel" speed? Being able to re-load and refuel in a minute is not very realistic, I think. In reality, I'd imagine it would take at least 30 minutes for a real ground crew to do this, depending on load out selected. Watching your plane being loaded with no visible crew or activity around it for 30 minutes...well, I suppose that would likely generate "bug" reports. But if you could show the ground crew personnel and equipment around the aircraft--even if shown in a 'static' position at each station--that 30 minutes would seem to go a lot quicker. Maybe with a count-down timer 'hovering' over each activity so you know how much longer it will be. For example, show one crewmember with the fuel hose, refueling the aircraft--maybe 7 minutes. At the same time, maybe 3 crew members are at the wingtip loading up a new AIM-9--4 minutes. While another crew member is at the rear of the aircraft loading in a new drag chute--4 minutes. Then the three ordnance persons move to the other wing tip and load that Sidewinder--another 4 minutes. They would just be static figures in a fixed pose and would 'jump' from station to station...but it would be something. From there they move to each of the 5 pylons and spend about 5 minutes at each--weapons have to be lifted to and mounted on pylons, cartridges have to be loaded, arming wires connected, safety pins installed. 5 minutes would be quick, I think. Would have to assume a multiple ejector rack would already have all its bombs attached, or that could be a long time. Additionally, might add the random, rare chance of the ground crew having to pull a weapon back off the plane because they found some sort of defect with it...just an idea. I know many people would choose "Fast", but there are nuts like me who want to wait the full time. Doesn't seem like it would take too much more programming to have the option. After arming, bring the air hose and electrical cable to the plane for engine starting. Safety pins: normally, I think the aircraft is loaded on the ramp and safety pinned. Then they taxi to the arming area near the runway--away from most personnel and structures--where the safety pins are removed and the aircraft is then armed and ready, under control of its cockpit weapons control panel. After flight, they need to stop at the arming area again, I think, to have safety pins re-inserted for remaining munitions, and pylons that could still be jettisoned by cockpit switches...but that jettison function is intended for flight use. Don't want them jettisoned on the ground. Also, at some point, safety pins are installed into the landing gear, I believe. Are there plans to add any of this to the F-5E module...or do some of these have to be added at the overall DCS World level?
  11. Thank you. I'll take this to the DCS Forums...I might even find it's already reported when I check there.
  12. Fer109, I read over the part in the DCS/Belsimtek manual you are talking about. I see your point. If there is nothing wrong with boost pump and generator switches being on at power-up (battery or ground power) in a real aircraft, then I'm fine with it. Then I agree with you. However, the DCS F-5E-3 manual is obviously not the real F-5E manual. Did Belsimtek faithfully copy over the correct procedures from the real USAF or Northrup Flight Manual or Pilot Checklist? Maybe. Is there a link in the Forums to a copy of the real USAF or Northrup manuals? I saw the one for the non-nuclear weapons systems. The F-5E-3 does not yet have fire bombs, as the real manual describes, for instance. I tried a startup in the sim with generator switches already on. Doesn't seem to make any difference. Maybe they are normally left on, in practice, in the real aircraft. Then Cold Start should have them on, as you are saying. Maybe after a "repair" is selected in the sim, only then the switches should or could be found in the OFF position.
  13. I think all of the position lights are supposed to flash when set to "flash". The upper and lower auxiliary position lights on the outer wings do not flash. I think they should along with the primary position lights on the engine intakes and the white tail lights. Also, the under fuselage lights (the two white lights under the cockpit) should flash in unison with the rest. Correct me if I'm wrong. I only know the F-4 Phantom II had similar lighting and I observed all those lights would flash in unison. The F-5's tail strobe or rotating beacon would, of course, flash independently, as you have it doing. Modern aircraft have strobes or flashing LEDs. The original F-5E had a rotating beacon. I believe two small directional lights (mounted together in opposite directions inside the vertical tail) would rotate about 150 degrees left and right. I'd like an option for the rotating beacon effect, if you could.
  14. I believe the landing lights would provide some minimal, but useful, illumination of the ground to the left and right of the aircraft when taxiing at night. Say, 80 degrees to the left and right for about 50 meters? ...in addition to the strong beams forward.
  15. The white tail position light and red beacon light illuminate the inside of the engine tailpipes. Can that be fixed?
  16. Is this an F-5 module problem or all of DCS? Anyway, an aircraft can be flying in a 30-knot crosswind and at a crab angle with reference to the ground (but still flying straight through the moving air mass) but the exhaust trail streams back in line with the aircraft's ground track. It should trail straight back from the aircraft, because it is in the moving air mass as well. In other words, the whole contrail or exhaust trail is floating in the moving crosswind. Any clouds at that altitude should also be moving with the moving air mass.
  17. The Ground Crew Communications Menu Text is in Black font color and impossible to see in some situations, like night time or against a black background. Can you just make it all white (with shadow) or light-colored text?
  18. Yes, I was going to report this. The drag chute should get repacked with "Refuel/Re-arm" action. Currently, it seems to only get repacked if "aircraft repair" is selected from the menu. Could you also add an option to choose "Fast Re-arm/Refuel" or "Realistic Re-arm/Refuel" speed? For those who want realism, being able to re-load and refuel in a minute is not real. In reality, I'd imagine it would take at least 30 minutes for a real ground crew to do this, depending on load out selected. Staring at a plane with no visible crew or activity around it for 30 minutes...will likely generate "bug" reports. :) But if you could show the ground crew personnel and equipment around the aircraft--even if shown in a 'static' position at each station--that 30 minutes would seem to go a lot quicker. For example, show one crewmember with the fuel hose, refueling the aircraft--maybe 7 minutes. At the same time, maybe 3 crew members are at the wingtip loading up a new AIM-9--4 minutes. While another crew member is at the rear of the aircraft loading in a new drag chute--4 minutes. Then the three ordnance persons move to the other wing tip and load that Sidewinder--another 4 minutes. They would just be static figures in a fixed pose and would 'jump' from station to station...but it would be something. From there they move to each of the 5 pylons and spend about 5 minutes at each--weapons have to be lifted to and mounted on pylons, cartridges have to be loaded, arming wires connected, safety pins installed. 5 minutes would be quick, I think. Would have to assume a multiple ejector rack would already have all its bombs attached, or that could be a long time. I know many people would choose "Fast", but there are realists like me who want to wait the full time. Doesn't seem like it would take much programming to have the option. Safety pins: normally, I think the aircraft is loaded on the ramp and safety pinned. Then they taxi to the arming area near the runway--away from most personnel and structures--where the safety pins are removed and the aircraft is then armed and ready, under control of its cockpit weapons control panel.
  19. I noticed an issue where the ground crew wouldn't do anything if the canopy was closed...which it is closed after repair, for some reason. If one of your stabilators was missing, I'd say your repair time was going to be days...if not needing to return the aircraft to a major repair depot. ;) Actually, for the F-5, if a stabilator was missing, I doubt the aircraft could be controlled, in reality. I think it would nose in, or pitch up into a flat spin or something. BTW, I recall a video of a Blue Angels A-4F losing one side of its horizontal stabilizer in a mid-air collision. It nosed over into an inverted flat spin. Although that may have been partly due to CG issue after the pilot ejected. The plane hit the ground in an inverted, level flat spin.
  20. Oh, another thing: turn on the pitch and yaw damper switches. That helps smooth things out. Also, adjust your joystick response in the sim settings. I believe most real fighter joysticks are much stiffer and more resistant to movement than your typical computer gaming joysticks. But some real jet pilots might be able to weigh in on that.
  21. With the F-5E-3, you have the option of selecting flaps to AUTO, in which (central air data computer, I guess) will position the flaps optimally for your AOA and airspeed; or manually set them to UP, FIXED (an intermediate position), or FULL. And if the landing gear is down, I think the flaps are automatically set to FULL when AUTO is selected. I think manual mode, UP position is the default setting. If you choose AUTO, then you get what the plane thinks they should be. If you get into PIO (pilot induced oscillations - porpoising), the AUTO flaps may go a little nuts trying to set flaps for whatever you are trying to do, because your PIO has the AOA bouncing up and down. As mentioned by randomTOTEN, make sure your fuel is balanced. There's a switch to have the fuel system balance it for you, but you have to start it early in the flight. BTW, left and right fuel tanks are really front and rear internal fuselage tanks. So an imbalance affects CG and longitudinal stability. The F-5 wings are too thin, I guess, for internal wing tanks. So, setting flaps to manual - UP, I think you can take off and land with flaps UP, if you wish...might need a long runway, though. I like to set them manually, myself. But don't forget to raise them to UP (or AUTO) after takeoff. :) Also, don't forget to raise the gear after takeoff...and close the speed brakes before takeoff! I have taken off a few times with the speed brakes out. Checklists are a real good thing. Hope that helps. (or read the manual and study the flaps switches on the throttle and next to the throttle)
  22. I would prefer something other that just "cold" start. Maybe cold start would mean the aircraft is just released from maintenance and those switches are off (as it currently is the case). Maybe there should be a "warm" start configuration, where the aircraft has simply been "turned around" from a previous mission and some of those switches are still on as expected. That way it would give more options, more flexibility to us all.
  23. Does the F-5E weapons manual say anything about Zuni's? I thought that Zuni rockets were only used by the US Navy. Zuni's are 5" rockets. I think they use the same rocket motor as some of the Sidewinder missiles? The pods carried 4 Zuni's. Now, if Belsimtek would make an A-4C or A-4E Skyhawk (hint, hint), we could put Zuni pods on them. :) I'm all for that. Nice simple A-4E, like the F-5E. The A-7B, A-6A and F-4B were much more complex (they could carry Zuni's)...but much more systems to simulate.
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