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BritTorrent

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Posts posted by BritTorrent

  1. Bummer, so the fixes LNS made for the Viggen (and broken MiG-21 FM) won't make it into 1.5 this week.... unless ED decides to update both builds at once, which I think never happened.

     

    2.5 merge can't come soon enough.

     

    Yeah I really can't wait till 2.5 is out. It's gonna be better for everyone. Be better for consumers because we don't need to have two installs, and we won't have one version behind the other. And it'll be better for ED because they don't need to work on keeping two separate versions updated.

     

    Here's hoping it isn't too far away.

  2. Hey, just wondering if anyone has managed to find (or create) keybinds for the LS SKU and L MÅL buttons on the right panel?

     

    I've got all the other buttons for for CK37 and the navigation system set up on my keyboard but I can't seem to find keybunds for the two buttons above.

  3. We have every target present on our DS on a day to day basis. We only remove some range groups for large force excercises from time to time, and then as Stuka mentioned we'll just remove any ranges we aren't using.

     

    How's that for performance? When I try to run the map with every target, I get around 20-30fps max. And I'm using a i5 4690k and a 1070 so I'm hardly on a potato rig. I usually just delete the ones I'm not using.

     

    Gotham alone knocks my fps down from a steady 60fps to about 40.

  4. Maybe for civilian flights, but from what I've researched/heard explained at airshows the overhead break/pattern in the military is used for tactical reasons: Getting a flight of multiple jets on the ground as quickly as possible.

     

    Yeah I believe this is right. Goes back to WWII when the landing pattern was the point of the sortie where you were most vulnerable. You're low and slow with no energy to fight back with. The idea is to get everyone down on the floor as quick as possible in case you get jumped.

  5. Hey everyone. :)

     

    A couple of days ago, the very first promo builds for the Viggen went out!

    Einstein over at the awesome Mudspike forums posted up some initial shots:

     

    https://forums.mudspike.com/t/leatherneck-ajs-37-viggen/2319/307

     

     

    (note: The VID display has changed since the promo build was built, and now properly points towards the player and fills the scope appropriately) :)

     

    Oh man this looks great, really can't wait now. The VID implementation looks really good, I was wondering how you'd pull that off.

  6. We actually started a tool like this of our own, but we haven't had the time to bring it to fruition.

     

    It's a great idea! We'll investigate. :)

     

    BMS has something similar to this in the form of the Weapons Delivery Planner program. It's invaluable to the mission planning process and it really adds to the immersion.

     

    It's definitely something worth considering if you had plans to create one, I'm sure it'd be extremely popular. In fact I'm sure a lot of people wouldn't mind paying a little for an extra feature like that. I know I would.

  7. Manual has been updated in the first post. Changelog is as follows.

    Thanks to everyone for input and feedback!

     

    • Increased margins
    • Added bookmarks
    • Clickable index
    • Fixed mil/km distance indicator flip
    • Fixed missing “I” (Thanks BritTorrent!)
    • Changed Heading 1 design
    • Added Chapter Number on pages
    • Various spelling and grammar fixes
    • Rounded up some stray image captions
    • Fixed Left indicator / warning table numbering
    • Fixed Right indicator / warning table numbering
    • Removed some odd page breaks
       
    • Fixed Flight control system cockpit overview numbering
    • Added various Note boxes
    • Changed RPM picture to show 69%
    • Changed EGT Caption
    • Removed reference numbers in Backup Attitude Indicator text
    • Fixed transparency on P.216.
    • Fixed numbering on P23.
    • Fixed odd text stretch on P267
       
    • Numerous transparency fixes

     

    Varsågod :P

  8. As has already been stated, what's giving you away is your rotor disc. Your fuselage might be stationary but your rotor disc is moving at high speed.

     

    Realistically, helicopters would never be sent into a situation where you didn't already have air superiority. Because they're extremely vulnerable to enemy fighters and SAM's.

     

    In game, your best bet is to use terrain masking or hiding behind buildings to avoid detection. But in general, if there's enemy fighters about, your chances of survival are pretty slim.

  9. Good text passage from a RAF pilot interview:

     

    Squadron exchanges were a regular occurrence at Coltishall, and while on 41 Mike participated in a particularly interesting one with F6 wing of the Swedish Air Force at Karlsborg, flying the AJ37 Viggen. Right from the start, he and his colleagues realised that much was exceptional about the way the Swedes trained and operated, not least considering that the majority of the pilots were effectively doing national service. ‘When you looked at the people who were flying the aeroplanes, I thought that we could learn from this, definitely. The guy who flew me was a Honda 500cc works motorcycle rider; they had rally drivers, go-kart racers, all kinds of things. These weren’t people with good degrees in underwater basket-weaving, these were people who were recruited to fly the Viggen.

     

    The first to go up in the Viggen was our boss, Hilton Moses. I remember going out with him to the aeroplane and seeing him laughing and smiling, and then seeing him getting out and coming back to the crewroom looking like he’d just been put through some kind of crazy combination between a fairground ride and a washing machine. Then I went flying in the afternoon, and it changed my life.

    ‘They would fly around at Mach 0.95, 650kt give or take a bit, and they trained at 10m. We flew through firebreaks in trees, we flew all over northern Sweden at 30ft, and we never went below 600kt. All of this, I should add, was done under about a 150 to 200ft overcast with no breaks. In the RAF, anybody who wanted to get old would not have flown in that weather. After about 40 minutes, we pulled up into cloud, and the pilot then flew a 4-degree hands-off approach with his hands on his head into a remote airstrip, landed, reversed into a parking bay, did an engine-running refuel without any communication with the people on the ground except hand signals, taxied out and took off in the direction that we’d landed in. Wind
 direction just wasn’t factored.Then we did some approaches onto roadways, flying at 15 or 20ft to clear the cars and warn them that there were going to be some aeroplane movements before doing practice approaches. And the aerobatics beggared belief.

     

    The next day, it was time to take the Swedish pilots flying in the Jaguar. I was at a bit of a loss as to how I was going to mission was on 19 January, and even then explain to this guy that we flew at 420kt when they flew at 620kt. So I decided that the way ahead was to leave the part-throttle reheat in, accelerate to 620kt and then give him the aeroplane. That’s what I did I tookoff,and gave him control at 620kt and about
 150ft. He pushed the nose down, took the Jaguar down to 30ft and proceeded to fly it at about 30 to 40ft and 600kt-plus quite happily.

     

    It knocked all the myths about who’s got the best aeroplanes, who’s got the best-trained pilots and so on. The Swedish Air Force had aeroplanes that were light years ahead of anything the RAF had, or was going to get, or has got now, and their pilots were in a totally different league to us. This was not just an individual — I flew with three of them, and all three were like that. Each of them was able to fly the Jaguar faster and lower from the back seat than I could from the front seat.

     

    That was an interesting read! You got a source for this?

  10. The dark areas are where a radar ray has hit terrain.

    Think of it as a really thin horizontal cross-section of what is in front of you.

     

    So, as you can see, I'm about to fly into a mountain, as there is terrain really close to my aircraft (bottom of the screen). The correct avoidance procedure here would be to bank right or left, and follow the clear areas.

    If the screen is totally clear, you don't have anything in front of you, yes, but that is much more likely over flat terrain or far above anything else.

     

    Understood, thanks for the response!

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