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wernst

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Everything posted by wernst

  1. When flying F-86 at 160 - 170 kts IAS on downwind, gear down, flaps deployed and turning to (long) final the speed would not slow down even with power cut (throttle to idle). Lowering the angle of attack to approach config makes this phenomenon even worse, speed increases. Even with speed brakes deployed I can’t reduce speed to healthy landing at 120 kts, All real planes I have flown, e.g. C206 with 2.000 kg take-off weight, would start descending like a stone and bleeding off airspeed as soon as I pull throttle back to idle with nose up config. The original F-86 flight manual advices throttle to idle AFTER touchdown with 110 kts. This strange behavior can be observed with other DCS aircraft too, but less pronounced.
  2. Increasing approach angle = increasing angle of approach = steeper approach = increasing angle of descent you may even find more terms for the same effect. Do you still claim flaps have nothing to do with this effect?
  3. Do you really want to claim, that not the flaps but the speedbrakes of the F-86F are primarily intended for increasing the angle of approach??? What do you guess is "the intended use-case" of the flaps? The speedbrakes do what the name suggests - only. How can shape and position (on fuselage) of the speedbrakes increase the curvature of the wing in order to raise lift and reduce stall speed during approach?
  4. I found earlier forum threads regarding "F-86F flaps and nose-up attitude“ http://forums.eagle.ru/showthread.php?t=127873 An extended description of flaps’ flight physics can be found here: http://www.pilotfriend.com/training/flight_training/fxd_wing/use_of_flaps.htm In short: “Flaps contribute primarily to the landing approach angle by increasing the 'braking effect' of drag. The drag is used initially to increase the approach angle without a corresponding increase in speed.” Yes, that is what I 'm expecting as the main feature of flaps. Increasing the angle of descent (with better runway sight and obstacle clearance) without increasing speed. Other behavior than that seems to make no sense or may even be dangerous (nose up and stall)
  5. perfect, Justin - NDB approach even without DME, calculating time, sink rate and speed "free-handed", that is true IFR fidelity. IFR check passed. Yes, it's annoying that neither the radio compass nor the heading indicator has a reference mark on top of the instrument. How can I set the appropiate course on each instrument properly? Even a few degrees off may guide me into wilderness. I assume you are a real pilot. I have a question. As soon as I apply flaps in the F-86F the nose goes up distinctly and I have to trim nose down quite a bit. This attitude is opposite what I experience in other planes (virtual and real ones) Applying flaps in other planes have generally a nose down effect of different intensity which I compensate with trimming nose up. Do you have any explanation for the nose up behavior of F-86F when setting flaps?
  6. Now I get it. Placing the Dora on a carrier for take off isn't an option in the Mission Editor. Because there wasn't any functional German WWII aircraft carrier. The only carrier "Graf Zeppelin" was under construction during WWII and had never been finished. But for the P-51D it could be a possible option for the sim. On Nov 15, 1944, naval pilot Bob Elder started flight tests in a P-51D-5-NA 44-14017 from the deck of the carrier Shangri-La. This Mustang had been fitted with an arrestor hook, which was attached to a reinforced bulkhead behind the tail wheel opening. Note: There wasn't any catapult support.
  7. what do you mean by "...tried to turn it around after landing..."? I don't see anything wrong with this extraordinary landing. You didn't even use of the full landing area of the carrier. Great. This video is pretty challenging to all who are complaining here about Dora bugs.
  8. admirable landing skills! any headwind? How fast was the carrier moving forward? How about Dora take off from this carrier?
  9. congrats, best landing performance ever seen
  10. . . . yes, it's all about practice. But where and how has YoYo demonstrated a 400 m landing roll? It's not that I'm dubious about this landing performance, but I want to know the limits of a perfect Dora landing. My best try was 480 m landing roll . . . without any headwind vector! Remember: At the time when the Dora was built most of the German airfield were grass strips with an average lenght of 800 m only.
  11. I agree - FULLY!!! Yes, the Dora has a quite challenging FM - quite similar to the true flight characteristic of the real thing. Verified by a real WWII Pilot! Just this challenge makes this sim matchless. What do you want? Easy flying? O.k., Why not switch to GAME mode. It will cure all your issues and complaints about bugs. When I started to fly the Dora I realized, that it is the most defying sim plane I ever have flown. Now, after some weeks of flying, I gain more and more safe control in take-offs and landings, I achieve an increasing number of successes. Learning curve! That's the positive sense of achievement. If DCS planes would be easy to fly I wouldn't fly them. Biologist’s say: Even an octopus can learn. It’s all about learning curve, not bugs. W.E. (real taildragger pilot)
  12. In the phase of takeoff run wings may not stall before they have built up enough lift (dynamic pressure). Just to avoid left wing lowering (and stall) because of torque effect the pilot should give some right aileron in advance. It compensates for the torque in advance and prepares for the moment, when the plane is in transition from roll to lift. At this moment the prop torque has full impact on the roll axis and on the wings from being level. The theories behind forces which have impact on the plane during takeoff are more than complex: Yaw, torque, P-factor (propeller’s angle of attack), gyroscopic precession are the key factors which either boost or agitate against each other at the same time. However, an important question is: How well have these 4 factors been implemented in the flight model (FM) of the Dora? These factors are describing the flight physics of real planes. We may discuss different Dora takeoff methods FROM THEORY but we don’t know which of these factors are relevant for the virtual Dora and which not. The FM of Dora is by far the most intrigue and perfect aviation simulation for any existing PC environment. But it is still a simulation, not reality. Therefore, back to practice: Here is an example of a famous war bird the F4U Corsair, built from early 40th to late 50th This powerful bird had aileron trim. For takeoff the pilot sets rudder 6 deg. right and aileron 6 deg. right wing down. Here is a F4U instruction video, see clip at 6:20 http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/F4U.html Again, it’s all about the learning curve from multiple exercises.
  13. Some more remarks about theory and practice of takeoff The theories behind forces which have impact on the plane during takeoff are more than complex: Yaw, torque, P-factor (propeller’s angle of attack), gyroscopic precession are the key factors which either boost or agitate against each other at the same time. An important question is: How well have these 4 factors been implemented in the flight model (FM) of the Dora? These factors are describing the flight physics of real planes. We may discuss different Dora takeoff methods FROM THEORY but we don’t know which of these factors are relevant for the virtual Dora and which not. The FM of Dora is by far the most intrigue and perfect aviation simulation for any existing PC environment. But it is still a simulation, not reality. Therefore, back to practice: Here is an example of a famous war bird the F4U Corsair, built from early 40th to late 50th This powerful bird had aileron trim. For takeoff the pilot sets rudder 6 deg. right and aileron 6 deg. right wing down. Here is a F4U instruction video, see clip at 6:20 http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/F4U.html Whether it complies with theory or not, I’m able to successfully master takeoffs in the Dora as follows: Max power (full throttle to START) straightway from the beginning of the takeoff run hold the stick fully back and keep the plane centered on the runway by "determined" rudder control until 170 km/h are gained At about 170 - 180 km/h don't center the stick to the precise middle position but carefully to a little more middle-right position. With the right wing a little down the Dora stays more safely on the runway as to apply too much right rudder only. Even with crosswinds, regardless from right or left, apply “some” amount of right rudder and right aileron. Don't just throw in any amount of right aileron. Let the airplane tell you what it needs then give that to the airplane. This goes for BOTH, for aileron and rudder correction. The airplane will tell you what it wants. Fly this way and you'll do just fine. Again, it’s all about the learning curve from multiple exercises . . . . this rule applies for real or sim planes equally.
  14. Yes, stick full(!) back immediately after 3-point landing, that’s it. Surprisingly I found that applying both wheel brakes fully right after touch down causes no head stand. (as it would be the case with the P-51D) Applying both brakes evenly - not any rudder control - keeps the Dora straight on the runway, minor corrections with each single brake may be made in roll out later. Here my practice (watch from 2:10) “…strangely difficult to apply both brakes exactly evenly”. With my Saitek Pro Flight Combat Rudder I don’t have that issue. But, why not using key “W” (both wheel brakes) on your keyboard?
  15. best take-off practice? I'm applying rudder AND (!) aileron control theory: At high power and low airspeed (as in take-off runs) the prop wash effect causing the plane to yaw to the left (prop rotating clockwise). The pilot compensates this force through (right) rudder control. Fine, that’s what we are all doing, more or less, initially. But there is another physical force in take-off runs. The effect of propeller torque has an influence on the roll axis. This force isn't countered by moving the rudder but by lowering the appropriate wing via aileron control. For planes with props which rotating clockwise the pilot has to apply some right aileron (right wing a little down) in order to counter the aircraft's left roll tendency. practice: At about 170 - 180 km/h I do not center the stick (carefully) to the precise middle position but a little to the middle-right position. With the right wing a little down the Dora stays more safely on the runway as to apply too much right rudder only. Even with crosswinds, regardless from right or left, I apply a well dosed amount of right rudder and right aileron. The learning curve from multiple exercises will give you a feeling for the optimum amount of combined right rudder and right aileron control. BTW: I apply max power (full throttle to START) straightway from the beginning of the takeoff run (not any “2500 rpm” or “gradually increase” technique) happy take off - safe landing
  16. Yes, Godpeed, right rudder AND right aileron, that’s what I practice as well successfully, in sim and in reality. theory: At high power and low airspeed (as take-off run) the prop wash effect causing the plane to yaw to the left. The pilot compensates this force through right rudder control. O.k. that’s what we are all doing, more or less. But there is another effect in take-off runs. The effect of propeller torque is an influence about the roll axis. It’s not countered by moving the rudder but by lowering the appropriate wing via aileron control. For planes with props which rotating clockwise the pilot has to apply some right aileron (right wing a little down) in order to counter the aircraft roll left tendency. practice: At about 170 - 180 km/h I don’t center the stick to the precise middle position but a little to the middle-right. With the right wing a little down the Dora stays better on the runway than applying too much right rudder only. Even with crosswinds, regardless from right or left, I apply a well dosed amount of right rudder and right aileron. The learning curve from multiple exercises will give you a feeling for the optimum amount of combined right rudder and right aileron.
  17. Assuming that you have aligned your approach and landing touch down excactly to the runway heading and you have performed a perfect three-point landing - then - above 100 km/h: apply BOTH wheel brakes equally, fully - forget any rudder control - below 100 km/h: use single wheelbrakes carefully to steer and keep the Dora on the runway That's all.
  18. yes, but make sure to apply BOTH wheel brakes after touch down equally. If landing roll speed has decreased try to stay on the runway by tapping on the appropiate single brake.
  19. landing speed of gliders at touch down with full speed brakes applied is less than 60 km/h. Landing roll on grass fields (no headwind) will usually take then less than 50 m. Rudder helps a bit to get clear from the runway, even one does not steer at all nothing serious will happen. W.E. (PPL-A,-C pilot)
  20. It’s not a bug - it’s the learning curve wolfstriked said: “It’s not a bug its more that the FM is a bitch to handle.” He is right. Yes, the Dora has a quite challenging FM - quite similar to the true flight characteristic of the real thing. But, what do you want? Easy flying? O.k., switch to GAME. It will cure all your issues you are complaining about here. e.g. rudder off center: With my own 1947 built taildragger I experienced this kind of rudder displacement quite often. The rudder control cables are quite long. They are aging, getting longer, getting flimsy, due to temp and other influences. Unfortunately the elongation appears not always equally on both sides. As result, the rudder behaves not always as being centered and tightly stretched. The ground crew may correct this displacement from case to case by bending the fixed trim tabs on the rudder. But also these trim tab settings may change from flight to flight in an unwanted way. These are true imperfections which you'll face in reality - why do you want the FM being smooth and perfect here? If you feel the Dora needs more right rudder than left (sure it does), just apply more right rudder. After a couple of flights you’ll learn to handle this deviation. It’s like shooting with one specific rifle. After some shots, which missed the center of the round target, you’ll get a feeling for the amount of pointing at off center in order to hit center. It’s a learning curve. When I started to fly the Dora I realized, that it is the most challenging sim plane I ever have flown. Now, after some weeks of flying, I gain more and more safe control in take-offs and landings, I achieve an increasing number of successes. Learning curve! That's fun. Recently I have shown a stable spot landing on the threshold with landing roll below 500 m. Great. I was happy. My second success was a safe power off landing from 4.000 m above field. Even more happy. Would it be possible to get this feeling of success with an autopilot landing? In any combat mission you'll face events which require your specific reaction, immediately. There is no predictable scenario. Take-offs and landings are part of this unpredictable scenario. THAT IS the true fun of the sim! Biologist’s say: Even an octopus can learn. Yes, it’s all about learning curve, not bugs. W.E. (Germany - which explains the clumsy English)
  21. To which "document (page 2 item 5)" are you referring to? I'm interested to know more about radiator flaps control. The flaps can be operated manually on the ground, opening and closing, slowly but surely, seen from outside view. But as soon as the Dora is in the air the flaps operate automatically ignoring any manual control. This is seems to be logic for engine temp overheat safety reasons. My question is, what then is the purpose of having manual control at all?
  22. Hi Godpeed, I refer to your youtube video “DCS FW190 deadstick.1st landing” If this was your first Dora flight with first landing attempt even after engine died and prop stopped spinning . . . Why then complain about "struggling with landing"? Was it skills or one time luck? A “lively” dead stick landing as shown in your video can’t be luck, it couldn’t have been done better (except a little dancing at the end of landing roll) If you can perform a dead stick landing as such what is difficult about a normal landing with full power control? Meanwhile I was also able to provoke an engine seize with prop spinning stop. It’s not that easy, the Jumo 213-A1 was sturdy built and is not as critical heat sensitive as e.g. the DCS P-51D. It took me more than 20 minutes flight with max. power (throttle to “START”, 3.250 rpm) and MW-50 boost switch “EIN” until Dora's engine died and the prop stopped spinning. I was lucky to perform a dead stick emergency landing without damage from 6.000 ft above the near field.
  23. Fw 190 D-9 emergency landing after simulated engine failure Engine failure may occur in or off combat mission. This video demonstrates an emergency landing after simulated engine shut down (throttle: "AUS", fuel selector: "ZU", magnetos: "0") from 4.000 ft above field (KRYMSK) happy flying - safe landing
  24. your video is now listed as "private", no access anymore. Any reason? When I've seen the video first I was wondering why the prop wasn't spinning. Even with engine power off the prop will keep spinning in the air, at least slowly. The prop only stops altogether due to a jammed or poorly turning engine. I wonder whether this type of engine failure has been implemented into Dora's system sim.
  25. you have passed your Fw 190 D-9 Rating successfully, ready for combat mission. You're well prepared for an off field landing after engine stop which might be rather likely happen in combat
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