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Bunyap

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  1. As I'm sure you know, these missions are extensively researched and nothing, and I mean nothing is included just by chance. Here is an example from mission 12 that takes place late in the afternoon of 30 June 1944. The target is a supply dump on the east side of the Orne river near the village of la Moissonniere. This would have been a common sight on the German side of the lines especially with the arrival of II SS Panzer Corps and the influx of personnel and equipment along the roads. The squadron flew with bombs on the mission this is based on but for now we attack the target with guns. This is the target photo included with the briefing. The grid reference, date, time, and altitude were not chosen at random. Those are the coordinates in WWII Army/Air format and details from the photo set that would have probably been used to prepare for the mission. This is how the target location looks on the current version of the map: This is the real target photo overlaid on that exact location. There are a few little differences but that is not too bad! The late afternoon of 30 June was not chosen at random either. There was a lot more going on at the moment than meets the eye but that will have to wait until more WWII assets are available to properly recreate it. The mission will be updated with a big surprise at some point!
  2. It is in testing now but it depends on how many others were in testing first and what they find. You will probably know the moment I do. :)
  3. Hey Sandman, sorry about the late reply. This one slipped through the cracks and I didn't see your post. That always means they have not seen the target you have in mind. The process the AI goes through for target detection mimics the process a human goes through so aspect angle, size, distance, target background, weather, illumination, AI skill level, and a bunch of other things are taken into account. The best advice I can give is to always listen to your wingmen and decide when to order an attack based on what they are telling you they see. These are the tips from the introduction that apply: - There are many, many targets behind the front lines and it is very easy for your squadron to go after one you did not intend them to. When in doubt, give the command to ‘rejoin formation’. Better to reform and try again than to lose everybody on an attack you did not intend to happen. - Wingmen will sometimes reply with calls like ‘two, negative’ or ‘three, unable’ in response to your radio command to attack. Do not let that frustrate you. This is always one of two things: they either do not see a valid target or they do not have the proper weapons for that target type you are telling them to attack. The weather is terrible on some missions and this has the appropriate effect on the AI’s ability to spot targets. Always wait until they give the radio call ‘contact target’ or ‘tally bandits’ before giving the command. - Listen closely to what your flight is reporting. For example, ‘Contact target, 2 o’clock for three.’ means ‘I see a vehicle or other suitable soft target, in front of me and to the right, three miles away’. This is your cue to start looking for the target yourself. Assuming your flight is flying in formation when the call is made, it should be a simple matter to scan the proper area and locate the target they have in sight. - Be specific when giving radio commands to your squadron and avoid the generic ‘Engage Ground Targets’ command if possible. Your flight will prioritize air defense targets and will not last long. You will want to use radio command ‘Engage Utility Vehicles’ in most cases. - Avoid more than one attack on the same target. It was common for German flak positions not to fire and give away their position until nearby units were attacked. Many targets you will encounter can be expected to behave in this way. - Spitfires and Mustangs will not engage armor with guns so avoid the ‘Engage Armor’ call. You can bet that other vehicle targets are around so send your squadron after those instead. - Use the ‘Engage Air Defenses’ command sparingly. Flak positions are everywhere and your squadron’s best chance of survival comes from avoiding defended locations. I would have to double check but ground fire accuracy was toned way down for BMPs and Armor about a year ago. There was only a very short line in the change log but there was a definite change at the time. It is very possible it changed back so I'll double check when I get a few minutes. As far as the WWII flak, you definitely want to avoid it and skip the well defended targets you encounter. A lot of time was spent tuning placement and behavior to ensure you and your wingmen survive 99% of the time if the right tactics are used. If it is a pre-planned target like on mission 2 and 12, you will want to make one attack, two at most. This is part of the tactics section included with the full pdf briefings. It is paraphrased from a real tactics manual from the time: "Keep a sharp lookout for movement of any type along the roads and report any sightings to the squadron immediately. Most enemy activity on the roads occurs at night so keep an eye out for vehicles dispersed under trees out of sight. There are many abandoned vehicles in this area so be sure your target is valid before wasting ammunition. The enemy have also been known to concentrate flak around dummy targets hoping to lure unsuspecting aircraft in. Be prepared to evade and call off an attack at any time if flak is too thick." "Strafing columns on the road within range of their flak and small arms is one of the most dangerous tasks we are likely to face. Our standard attack approach is started from a wide turn leveling out at about 1,500 feet above the target. Attacks on moving targets such as motor transport and locomotives are generally carried out from an angle of 30 degrees from their front. The pilot will then line the target up in their sights in a 25-30 degree dive and start firing at max effective range of about 500 yards. Departure from the target is at full throttle and low level for about 30 seconds to keep out of any nearby flak gunner’s view. A turn is also made to stay out of the line of fire of the next aircraft. We will only repeat an attack if there are many vehicles present and it is determined that the flak is not dangerous." Hope this helps...
  4. I assume sometimes that folks who take more than a passing interest in DCS: WWII have seen this but, yeah, probably not. :) This is the very first pass at research for this and the upcoming Operation Charnwood campaign for the 3rd through the 10th of July 1944. Keep in mind these videos are simply me getting up in the morning and performing research in real-time several months ago. Many of my conclusions are slightly off and were amended after performing a similar study of EVERY other squadron in the British Second Tactical Air Force for these dates. Here is the link to the entire playlist starting on the 1st of June:
  5. Good question. I'm blissfully insulated from internal goings on so I don't know the current status, only that the change is expected soon. I would imagine such a big change comes with other unintended consequences and those are still being worked out. The Epsom missions themselves will have you controlling a squadron of eight aircraft in the same airspace as five or six other squadrons. More of a premium is placed on how well you manage your assets and the tactics you use than relative performance or capabilities of the aircraft. Who sees who first is usually what determines the outcome, at least when I flew them. You will vastly outnumber the enemy if you do it well or be vastly outnumbered yourself if you do it poorly. None of that is necessarily by design, that is just how it played out when we set up the real allied and axis air plan and set it in motion. I'm probably the least qualified person to recommend for or against a purchase. I would be interested to hear what those who have actually flown all the missions, and more importantly read the intel assessments and followed the tactics described in the briefings, have to say about how much of an impact the AI actually had.
  6. This is transcribed from RCAF records. Yep, I retired out of 9th AF HQ so I know the deal. There actually is a IX Air Force now but that is another situation altogether...
  7. No, the Charnwood campaign will be for the P-51 only. We will get back to the Spitfire eventually. There is a lot of war and a lot of aircraft to cover. :) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Also, reading the original post again, I wasn't too clear on what these covered. The recaps posted here are for the current Operation Epsom missions running from 24 June - 30 June. The Operation Charnwood campaign runs from 03 July - 10 July. The recaps for those dates are already integrated into the briefings.
  8. The briefings for the upcoming Operation Charnwood P-51 campaign will include wording from these daily recaps from the RCAF overseas headquarters. The documentation used for building of the actual missions is, of course, several orders of magnitude more detailed (picture the detail seen in my 'Four Months in the Life' video series but extended to every squadron in Second Tactical Air Force) but these are very good summaries of events as seen from the ground as they happened. These will make it into the 'Previous 24 Hours' and 'Enemy Air Intel' sections of the Operation Epsom briefings as well the next time we do an update but I will share them here first. For reference: - The player is part of the RAF's Second Tactical Air Force, or 2 TAF. - A.E.A.F. or Allied Expeditionary Air Force, is made up of 2 TAF and the U.S. IX Air Force. They directly support the armies on the ground. - The U.S. VIII Air Force consists of heavy bombers on strategic missions with fighters in support. They participate in Normandy operations upon request/direction. - A.D.G.B., or Air Defense of Great Britain, previously known as RAF Fighter Command, sometimes supports Normandy operations. - Bomber Command is the RAF's strategic bomber force but they occasionally support Normandy operations, as you will see big time in the Operation Charnwood campaign. - 'DIVER' refers to V-1 flying bombs. - 'NOBALL' refers to V-1 launch sites and support facilities. - 'NEPTUNE' refers to Normandy landing operations. - Combat results expressed as (3-1-1), for example, refer to enemy aircraft destroyed, probably destroyed, and damaged. Dawn 23 June to Dawn 24 June 1944 Weather forced the cancellation of some portions of the program of the various air forces. Eighth Air Force operated dispatching 408 Fortresses and Liberators and 362 fighter aircraft, which provided escort and support, as well as 185 fighter bombers. Five airfields, 13 NOBALL targets, 3 bridges and other targets were attacked. Seven bombers and 3 fighters were lost. There were no claims put forth. A.E.A.F. attacks against NOBALL targets and fuel dumps were rendered abortive in some cases, and some of these operations were perforce cancelled due to weather. Ninth Air Force fighter bombers attacked the enemy transportation system from Paris, west and southwest to below the Loire. Many locomotives and much rolling stock was destroyed. Second Tactical Air Force put forth a considerable effort in armed recces, sweeping areas behind German lines from Avranches and Vire, and as far east as Evreux and Versailles. Typhoons and Mustangs attacked railway junctions and radar stations, headquarters buildings, the Mezidon marshaling yard and numerous smaller road and rail targets. The usual beachhead cover patrols were flown. During hours of darkness, 2 TAF and A.D.G.B. dispatched Mosquitoes which attacked enemy movement and enemy air defenses. Standing, precautionary and low fighter cover patrol were flown over the beachhead during both day and night periods. Five enemy aircraft were claimed destroyed as a result of night interceptions. Some 245 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar, 40 plus enemy aircraft operated defensively over areas of northern France, including the beachhead area, during daylight. A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted a total of 53 aircraft (Me 109s) plus about 72 Fw 190s over the Caen/Evreux/Lisieux/Dreux area. Several combats ensued. By night, some 39 enemy aircraft operated over Belgium and Holland, and in addition, minelaying was suspected in the NEPTUNE area. One enemy aircraft made landfall over Orfordness, and was intercepted and shot down at 0020 hours by a Mosquito of 25 Squadron. DIVER [V-1 Flying Bomb] activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 745 2 TAF: 1,029 IX Air Force: 1,114 Total: 2,888 Dawn 24 June to Dawn 25 June 1944 Weather was excellent over bases in England and generally very good in the various target areas. The greatest number of individual missions were scheduled this day, and very few of these were cancelled. 8th Air Force operated, dispatching 1,196 Fortresses and Liberators, escorted and supported by 700 fighters, which attacked one marshalling yard, eight airfields, eight NOBALL targets, two bridges and nine other targets. Fighters claim 32 aircraft destroyed and 7 damaged on the ground. Three bombers and one fighter are missing. A.E.A.F. divided its attacks between NOBALLs, tactical targets, transportation facilities and defended localities at Cherbourg. Marauders, Bostons, Mitchells, attacked six NOBALLs, a bridge, and Marauders attacked four batteries in the Cherbourg area. Four fuel dumps were attacked by Bostons and Thunderbolts. Mitchells attacked two German military headquarters, Mustangs attacked a steel works and Typhoons a strongpoint at Cheux. Thunderbolts (bomber) concentrated on rail and bridge targets in the enemy’s rear, as far east as Paris. Armed Recces which commenced with first light, covered the same region with emphasis on the Le Mans, Laval, Domfront areas. The usual defensive and beachhead patrols were flown. During the hours of darkness 2 TAF and A.D.G.B. dispatched 74 Mosquitoes and 13 Mitchell (flare dropping) which attacked enemy movement and patrolled enemy airfields. Precautionary, standing and interception patrols were flown by Mosquitoes and Beaufighters of the A.D.G.B. Three enemy aircraft destroyed, one probable and one damaged are claimed by night and one mosquito of 418 R.C.A.F. Squadron is missing, but the crew or safe, as is the mosquito of 96 Squadron (crew also safe), and one of 264 Squadron. A total of 392 enemy aircraft operated. Some 12 Me 109 attacked Spitfires over the beachhead between 0720 and 0929 hours and seven Fw 190 attacked P-47s over Beville during the same period. A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted 40 plus enemy aircraft (Fw 190/Me 109) in the Evreux area (1110/1309 hours) four enemy aircraft in the Domfront area (1418/1550 hours) 30 enemy aircraft north of Dreux (1355/1636 hours). One Me 109 which ventured over the beachhead area was destroyed. Some 26 enemy aircraft patrolled areas over northern France during the night period. DIVER activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 965 2 TAF: 1,252 IX Air Force: 1,937 Total: 4,154 Dawn 25 June to Dawn 26 June 1944 The pattern of the day’s aerial activity was substantially the same as the preceding day period. Weather was good during the early portions of the period, although as the day wore on, several operations ordered for the afternoon were postponed, but many of these were carried out in the early evening. This day was marked apart from others since D-Day by the scale and determined character of enemy air opposition. VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 1,200 Fortresses and Liberators, escorted and supported by 673 fighters, which attacked six airfields, 19 NOBALLs, and two large supply dumps near Toulouse. Bridges in Northern France were also attacked. Fighter claims are 19-0-6 (air) and 4-0-3 (ground) for the loss of two fighters and 10 bombers. A.E.A.F. carried out numerous armed recces over the whole tactical area. Mustangs attacked railways in the Chartres area, while Lightnings bombed seven key points on the line between Orleans and Paris. Typhoons destroyed a bridge at Elbouf. Marauders attacked the Mezidon Marshalling Yard, and Thunderbolts a bridge at St Sauveur. Bostons and Marauders attacked two fuel dumps with excellent results. Three NOBALLs were attacked in the evening and Thunderbolts attacked one radar station. During the course of these operations, large forces of enemy aircraft were encountered, and very determined interception was attempted by the enemy. Many enemy casualties are claimed. During the hours of darkness, 2 TAF and A.D.G.B. dispatched 25 Mosquitoes, which attacked rail targets and road junctions. Beaufighters and Mosquitoes maintained beachhead, standing and interception patrols during the hours of darkness. A total of 285 enemy aircraft operated. During the morning, IX Air Force aircraft encountered 100 plus enemy aircraft (Fw 190/Me 109) over Northern France. 2 TAF met 40 plus (same types) during the period, engagements resulting. In the afternoon, 2 TAF aircraft encountered 30 plus Me 109s near Caen, which decamped upon being attacked. Some 40 enemy aircraft (long range bombers) operated at night, suspected of mine laying. DIVER activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 621 2 TAF: 1,013 IX Air Force: 1,625 Total: 3,259 Dawn 26 June to Dawn 27 June 1944 Adverse weather conditions curtailed offensive operations. VIII Air Force did not operate during this period. A.E.A.F. dispatched several offensive sorties, chief among which was an attack by Mosquitoes late in the period on road and rail targets in the Villers/Aunay and Argenatn/Dreux areas. Spitfires and Mustangs flew armed recces over Caen/Falaise area between 0500 and 1100 hours. Thunderbolts attacked railway centers at Lens and west of Chartres. The usual defensive and beachhead patrols were flown. 2 TAF dispatched 21 Mosquitoes which attacked enemy movement during the night period. A.D.G.B.’s effort during the same period was mostly defensive. Some 146 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar, 105 enemy aircraft were airborne on defensive patrols over wide areas of France and parts of Holland. 2 TAF Spitfires encounteded two formations of enemy aircraft in the Lisieux and Caen/Rouen areas. According to radar, only one enemy aircraft operated defensively during the night period. DIVER activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 327 2 TAF: 372 IX Air Force: 32 Total: 731 Dawn 27 June to Dawn 28 June 1944 Unfavorable weather continued to curtail offensive operations. VIII Air Force operated, however, dispatching 186 bombers, escorted and supported by 182 fighters, and also dispatching 382 fighter bombers, which attacked five NOBALL targets, five airfields and one bridge target. Five Liberators and five fighters are missing. Fighter claims are 16-0-8. A.E.A.F. medium and light bombers did not operate. Activity consisted chiefly of armed reconnaissance, with road, rail, bridges and enemy troop concentrations as the main objectives. These were carried out with considerable success by forces of Mustangs, Thunderbolts, and a small force of Typhoons and Lightnings, over the Coutances/Vire/Argentan/Dreux/Alencon and further south over the Rennes/Laval/Angers area. Thunderbolts attacked a fuel dump at Argentan and Spitfires a radar station at Cap Frehel. Spitfires of No 83 Group attacked gun positions southwest of Caen, troop movements and mechanized transport south of Caen and in the area east to Lisieux and Aunay/Falaise. These operations were in support of the British and Canadian (2nd Army) advance west of Caen. During the night period, 2 TAF dispatched 20 Typhoons, which attacked a military HQ, and A.D.G.B. dispatched nine Mosqiuitoes and eight Spitfires on offensive patrols over enemy territory, as a result of which enemy aircraft claims of 3-0-0 were made. A total of 138 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar, 81 enemy aircraft operated over Northern France, Belgium, and the Dutch Islands. A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted some 43 Fw 190s and seven Me 109s in the Caen/Mainville/Dreux/Cabourg areas. Several combats ensued. Some 81 enemy aircraft (long range bombers) operated over France, Belgium and Holland during the night period. Two enemy aircraft made landfall over the U.K. DIVER activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 918 2 TAF: 808 IX Air Force: 649 Total: 2,375 Dawn 28 June to Dawn 29 June 1944 Weather conditions militated against offensive operations, and many missions scheduled after 0900 hours were perforce canceled. VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 992 bombers, 583 fighters, which attacked five airfields, three bridges, two marshaling yards and two other targets. Fighters claim 1-0-0 (air) and two bombers and two fighters are missing. A.E.A.F. offensive operations were chiefly restricted to armed recces in support of ground forces. Railway facilities, roads, a Corps HQ, enemy mechanized transport, tank and troop concentrations were attacked by Thunderbolts, Mustangs, Lightnings and Typhoons. A small force of Typhoons and Mustangs attacked bridges at Mulrecy, Verson and Goupillere. Routine beachhead and convoy patrols were flown. Night offensive patrols by A.D.G.B. were mainly uneventful. Standing, precautionary and interception patrols were flown. Some 426 enemy aircraft operated. During the day period considerable enemy activity took place over the battle area, with Caen as the focal point. According to radar, some 82 enemy aircraft operated over Northern France and Normandy, but A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted 197 plus enemy aircraft over these same areas. Some 50 enemy aircraft operated in the Brussels/Chievres area in opposition to Bomber Command’s efforts. Numerous combats ensued. By night, 15 long range bomber enemy aircraft operated, and 61 defensive and one recce patrol were flown. DIVER activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 711 2 TAF: 904 IX Air Force: 304 Total: 1,919 Dawn 29 June to Dawn 30 June 1944 Improved weather conditions made possible increased aerial activity. This was reflected in all phases of the effort. VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 1,150 Fortresses and Liberators, escorted and supported by 401 fighter aircraft, which attacked two marshalling yards, five airfields, and 13 other targets. Bombers claim 3-0-1 (air), fighters claim 34-0-9 (air) and 15-0-7 (ground) for the loss of 15 bombers and two fighters. A.E.A.F. operations were chiefly in support of ground operations. Marauders attacked gun batteries in the Cap de la Hague area, and Bostons were on railway lines at Dol/Rennes and St Hillaire/Vitre. With an emphasis on armed reconnaissance, fighter bombers and fighters attacked railway junctions, railway rolling stock, mechanized transport, troop and armored concentrations over a wide area behind the Battle Area. Thunderbolts dive-bombed strongpoints in the St Lo/Beaumont area with good results. Routine beachhead and convoy patrols were flown. During hours of darkness, 2 TAF dispatched 11 Mitchells (flare dropping) and 43 Mosquitoes, which attacked enemy movement. A.D.G.B. maintained standing, precautionary and interception patrols. Mosquitoes patrolled defensively over the beachhead during the night period. Some 185 enemy aircraft operated. According to radar some 21 enemy aircraft operated over France during the morning, but A.E.A.F. aircraft sighted some 51 enemy aircraft during the same period. A further 23 enemy aircraft were encountered during the early evening. Only two enemy aircraft operated by night. DIVER activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 833 2 TAF: 1,209 IX Air Force: 1,379 Total: 3,421 Dawn 30 June to Dawn 01 July 1944 Weather conditions, poor, with 10/10ths cloud obscuring many target areas., prevailed throughout the earlier parts of the day. By 1400 hours, weather had improved to the point where large scale operations were possible. VIII Air Force operated, dispatching 153 heavy bombers, 178 fighters (escort and support) and 322 fighter bombers, which attacked five airfields in Northern France, and miscellaneous targets of opportunity. Fighter claims are 3-3-4 (air) and 1-0-0 ground for the loss of one fighter and one bomber. A.E.A.F. medium and light bombers attacked roads and rail junctions in the Thury Harcourt and Conde sur Noireau areas. Mosquitoes, Lightnings and Thunderbolts attacked Crartres and Verneuil marshalling yard, and road, railways and junctions in the Argantan/Dreux/Chartres/Alencon area. Mustangs and Typhoons attacked bridges on the River Orne. Bridge targets east of Paris were also attacked. Lightnings attacked raod and rail troop movements over a wide area (Moulins/Nevers/Bourges/Montargis and Dijon/Troyes). Routine beachhead and convoy patrols were flown. 2nd TAF did not operate during the night period, but A.D.G.B. dispatched two Mosquitoes on offensive patrols. Mosquitoes on standing/interception patrols over the beachhead destroyed one Ju 188. A total of 242 enemy aircraft operated. With the massing of armor in the Caen/Lisieux area, enemy aerial activity increased somewhat. There was a strong reaction ti the IX Air Force attacks on marshalling yards and railway junctions. According to radar, some 22 enemy aircraft operated defensively, but A.E.A.F. aircraft encountered 70 Me 109s and 39 Fw 190s during the morning, afternoon and early evening. Numerous combats ensued. By night, roughly 100 enemy aircraft operated over Northern France, Holland and the Beachhead. Mine laying activities were suspected off the NEPTUNE area. DIVER activity continued. Sorties in Support of Normandy Operations: ADGB: 727 2 TAF: 1,073 IX Air Force: 1,375 Total: 3,175
  9. Hey great blog post, Wags and I really appreciate it. I have been following for a long time and our tastes seem exactly the same. :)
  10. Absolutely. Here is how to do it step by step: This is actually how I fly most campaigns.
  11. I hope I do not lead you astray here. Going way above and beyond with zones and spawning is what we had to do as well.
  12. Today's update to DCS: World included what should be a pretty hefty boost to overall graphics performance in these missions. The main change concerns how and when ground units are activated on the map. The unit count is the same but ground units now only show up if you fly near them, making the sim perform almost as if it were an empty map until you encounter the enemy along the route. As a side effect, you may encounter a very slight pause five or six times throughout the mission as new units are loaded but I believe you would agree this is well worth it. We also took the time to include a few recent additions like barrage balloons to ships where appropriate and plan to continue updating these missions as new assets become available. And of course, work continues on a follow-on campaign for the P-51 covering Operation Charnwood and the capture of Caen. More screenshots are available here: https://www.digitalcombatsimulator.com/en/downloads/screenshots/974/
  13. Here are a couple more from playing around in mission 12, my favorite one in terms of how it looks visually. We just finished more tweaks to the missions that should improve performance quite a bit, particularly on mission 12, and we hope to have them included in an update soon. There were also some small changes to the enemy AI that will make them a bit more quick to respond if attacked. It should still be possible to sneak up unobserved from the sun or their low six but it will be a little less of a sure thing now. We have also started work on a follow-on campaign for the P-51 that will provide an opportunity to carry out a greater variety of air to ground missions with bombs or rockets. More to come soon, but these have been a lot of fun to fly so far.
  14. Yeah, absolutely. There are a lot but we tried as much as possible to have ground units activate later in the mission and only if the player flies into their part of the map. It was such a remarkable week with four panzer divisions arriving by road in daylight that this is really the worst case in terms of units required behind the front lines. The placement is set up to give the player a number of opportunities to strafe that matches the records but we might look at reducing the number of ground units per group. There are still rail targets to add once that system matures so there will definitely have to be adjustments going forward. The 88mm flak guns might give us a chance to recoup some performance once their behavior is finalized. We know how many 'puffs' should be in the air from footage and the rate at which they should shoot down aircraft but it is too early to tell if we are over or under the mark. With any luck, we will be able to back off a bit on those once targeting, ballistics, and effects are in place. My fingers are crossed.
  15. A radio communications menu option was added with this update that can increase game performance as a last resort by removing effects at the Epsom battle location, removing some extra objects like channel shipping, reducing the squadron size from 8 to 4, and removing aircraft that are based in England altogether. This communications menu option is available under the F10 menu until you taxi: Keep in mind that this option does not really give the experience we had in mind. It is only intended to allow players who could not get airborne even at the lowest settings a chance to play the missions in some form. Excessive pauses and stutters have been reported across all versions and all terrains so ED is aware of it and working to find solutions. In the meantime, thanks for your patience. Things like 88mm flak effects, lower cloud bases, bombs for the Spitfire, and more AI aircraft types are going to add a lot to the experience when available. There is a long way to go but I wouldn't be here if I did not think they were capable of pulling off a great WWII environment.
  16. I'm just some guy who supplies the briefings but I haven't heard of any other reports of this. When you say you have no control over them, are you telling them to return to base at any point? As a rule of thumb, I head in the general direction of a good front lines crossing point when I hear the first 'bingo fuel' call and to keep the number of subsequent attacks to one or two. I don't worry too much at this point because they still have a reserve. I keep them in formation until the front lines are crossed and issue the command to RTB on the friendly side. Apart from a fringe case here and there when the airfield is very busy with other squadrons taking off or landing, they should have no trouble making it home. I suppose the trick is to conserve fuel aggressively whenever possible so they do not get in a bad spot in the first place. Let me know if you still have trouble with them but I believe this will do the trick.
  17. Just as an FYI to anyone choosing to fly this campaign with more of an emphasis on air to air, there is a SNAFU with Enfield 2, the player's second section of four aircraft, that can cause them to be unresponsive to enemy aircraft early in the mission. That was just fixed internally so they will be much more responsive to the 'engage bandits' command after the first update is released. (included with latest update) In the meantime, they should continue to do a pretty good job of strafing vehicles on the ground. Just like with your wingman, make sure they have been given a chance to detect the enemy before giving the command to engage. Generally, if your wingman calls 'contact target', notifying you that they have detected a valid target on the ground, you can assume the members of the second section have seen them too. Listening out for those radio calls and only giving the command to attack after they have the enemy in sight will ensure they all attack in a quick, predictable manner.
  18. Thanks a lot and we totally agree on the 88's. This is going to have a very different feel when they get that squared away. We are going to try to work more shipping in but as you say, it all comes down to performance. We are going to do our best to make it look like the photo below for July/August missions and of course it would be great to add Mulberry-B at Arromanches as well. One thing I'm very proud of is that no aspect of these missions is based on guesswork. We used contemporary records and photos for absolutely everything.
  19. Give this one a try if the \ key isn't working for you: Let me know if this does not do the trick.
  20. Thanks very much for checking this campaign out and thanks for all the great feedback so far. Current Status: All missions received a revamp to take advantage of new features in the DCS 2.5 open beta. The environment should be more 'alive' now with smoke visible at battle sites and other locations it was reported by aircrew, enhanced 88mm flak effects, and more visible tracers. The missions will continue to be updated as more features become available. Documentation: Just as a reminder, pdf documents with expanded briefings are available at /Mods/campaigns/Spitfire IX Epsom/Doc in your DCS: World installation folder. These include much more information on tactics and the ground battle that did not translate well to the in-game screen. Be sure to use these versions if you are preparing for your missions in detail. Kneeboards: Navigation can be extremely challenging without all our modern gadgets so each mission has 3-12 kneeboard pages built in. These can be accessed by using keyboard RShft-K and scrolling to the different pages using the [ and ] key. Gameplay Tips: A campaign introduction is also available with background information on the campaign and battle itself. It is available below as an attachment to this post if you would like to check it out. We tried to anticipate any questions you might have about the player's role and what you are intended to accomplish as well as provide as many tips as possible that occurred to us during testing. I will include those below and feel free to add your own. - Fuel management is critical and the entire route does not have to be flown at low level and at high speed. In fact, these will be very short missions if you do because you will quickly burn through your fuel. Engine RPM settings of 1800-2400 and boost settings of no more than +2 were the norm when out of combat and will allow you to stay in the air much longer. - The rest of the squadron is going to run out of fuel first and this is perfectly normal. Any speed, altitude, or course change you make along the way is amplified for the aircraft trying to stay in formation. Higher throttle and RPM settings are required in order to stay in position so it is important to keep this in mind while making course changes. Fly smoothly like any good flight lead and your squadron will be able to stay airborne much longer. - Your job is to navigate and make decisions. Your squadron’s job is to look out for targets and keep you informed. Be sure to set your radio up to receive their transmissions. Details are included in each briefing but be sure either button A, C, or D is selected on your radio panel. - Wingmen will sometimes reply with calls like ‘two, negative’ or ‘three, unable’ in response to your radio command to attack. Do not let that frustrate you. This is always one of two things: they either do not see a valid target or they do not have the proper weapons for that target type you are telling them to attack. The weather is terrible on some missions and this has the appropriate effect on the AI’s ability to spot targets. Always wait until they give the radio call ‘contact target’ or ‘tally bandits’ before giving the command. - Be specific when giving radio commands to your squadron and avoid the generic ‘Engage Ground Targets’ command if possible. Your flight will prioritize air defense targets and will not last long. You will want to use radio command ‘Engage Utility Vehicles’ in most cases. - Avoid more than one attack on the same target. It was common for German flak positions not to fire and give away their position until nearby units were attacked. Many targets you will encounter can be expected to behave in this way. - Spitfires and Mustangs will not engage armor with guns so avoid the ‘Engage Armor’ call. You can bet that other vehicle targets are around so send your squadron after those instead. - Use the ‘Engage Air Defenses’ command sparingly. Flak positions are everywhere and your squadron’s best chance of survival comes from avoiding defended locations. - Be careful when using the ‘cover me’ command. Your wingman will engage anything he sees as a threat to you including air defenses on the ground. - Listen closely to what your flight is reporting. For example, ‘Contact target, 2 o’clock for three.’ means ‘I see a vehicle or other suitable soft target, in front of me and to the right, three miles away’. This is your cue to start looking for the target yourself. Assuming your flight is flying in formation when the call is made, it should be a simple matter to scan the proper area and locate the target they have in sight. - Follow your wingman if you cannot spot the target yourself. Give the radio command to engage the target and fly in a position to provide support, watching for flak, and calling off the attack if needed. Once your squadron begins to attack, you can easily roll in on the right location. - There are many, many targets behind the front lines and it is very easy for your squadron to go after one you did not intend them to. When in doubt, give the command to ‘rejoin formation’. Better to reform and try again than to lose everybody on an attack you did not intend to happen. - Do not rush into air engagements. Use the sun or clouds to mask your approach and try to maneuver behind the enemy. The real WWII tactics described in the mission briefings work. It takes practice to get the timing right but you and your squadron can easily down several aircraft before they know you are there. - Don’t forget about the other squadrons. You can always turn and run for one of the standing patrols if you find yourself outnumbered. - Orders to the second section of four aircraft are given by selecting F10 (Other) from the communications menu then selecting the appropriate command. The command 'attack primary target' will ensure the second section attacks the planned target on mission 2 and 12. Applicable next patch: - Mission 2 and 12 task your squadron with destroying a specific target on the ground. The keyboard command LWin-R may be used to ensure the lead section attacks the planned target. The lead section will fly directly to the target and attack immediately when the command is given so only give the command when in position at the desired approach heading. The aircraft will not rejoin automatically so give the command to rejoin formation when the attack is complete through either the normal communications menu or keyboard LWin-Y. Please feel free to add your own tips below! Campaign Introduction.pdf
  21. Here is some data from Youtube. The vast majority of views are from random Google or Youtube searches, the entire point is to rope in new players after all, but it should still be representative of who is here. The part that worries me is male vs female ratio. That is a big problem.
  22. Very cool! FYI, I just added the full serial numbers for all aircraft so you will be able to get the right effect with the custom skins as you mentioned elsewhere. That should come along with the first update whenever that happens to be.
  23. Oh, hey there. I'm still around. :) I'm not really into forums, reddit, or anything like that so it probably looks like I have completely disappeared when no videos are going up. There is really nothing new I want to record right now so I'm just taking a break to do the documentation side of a WWII campaign with Wags. Thanks for asking though, I appreciate it.
  24. I have been working with them on the campaign built around Epsom and the choices seem very well tailored to what is needed. I would be confident with any campaign scenario ranging from May to mid-August based on what we have here. There is only one airfield that left me saying 'gosh I wish that one were there' but it is the job of the mission designer to make sure those cases do not affect a person's overall enjoyment of the experience. I am glad to put your mind at rest on anything specific if you want to shoot me a PM.
  25. You mean a set of missions designed based on actual squadron daily records, with AI flights carrying out missions just as they really happened, with flak batteries located based on both aircrew reports and actual reconnaissance photos, and with a ground battle based on the units’ own war diaries taking place below? Yeah, somebody should definitely get going on that. :) To all: (In all seriousness though, that sounds like a lot of details to track down but it really isn't that difficult. It just takes a lot of time and a high tolerance for tedium. If anybody is committed to doing something like that and needs a hint on where to find something specific I can nudge you in the right direction if needed. Just let me know here or via PM.)
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