Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do you need a quadrant to fly it properly?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Do you need a quadrant to fly it properly?

    Help me out please, guys. I'm interested in the module and went on to do some research as I always do, considering that where I live these modules are pretty expensive. In the video of one of the bigger YouTube channels of DCS, the guy suggested a quadrant for engine management. I just want to confirm if that's the case because I play on a simple t-16000 and I don't think I have a lot of axis for this. In the Chuck's manual looks like that's the case. Just want to know if anyone play without problems with a simpler stick or I'll buy another bird. Thanks in advance.

    #2
    I just have the prop up and down bound to a button and the turbo linked to the throttle. You can link the prop too if you don’t want to think about it. It’s up to you how complicated you want to go.


    Modules: A10C, F5, F14, F16, F18, F86, AV8B, UH1, Mi8, Ka50, FC3, Supercarrier, CA, P47, P51

    Comment


      #3
      So, I could use it without problems with only one axis for the throttle and link the other stuff to it? Sorry for asking something that looks like your answer already. It's just that I don't know what the stuff do. I'll have to learn it.

      Comment


        #4
        Yes


        Modules: A10C, F5, F14, F16, F18, F86, AV8B, UH1, Mi8, Ka50, FC3, Supercarrier, CA, P47, P51

        Comment


          #5
          Yea, it works just fine with a simple joystick. However if they change/update engine damage model it might get a bit tricky.
          If I understand it correctly overboosting and turbo overspeeding, engine temp, oil and inlet temperature can all lead to failure. Together with water injection, gun sight ranging and targeg size there is alot of stuff to manage. :-[
          Huey. Intel X5660 4,2ghz, 24gb ddr3, gtx 1060 6gb
          AJS37. Cyborg evo
          Yak 52. Opentrack ir
          KA-50
          P-47

          Comment


            #6
            I guess I'll just buy a more essential module first. Leave this for later on. Thanks.

            Comment


              #7
              Up to about 30k feet linking the turbo lever with throttle is sufficient really and the plane can be pretty much flown as Mustang, using only two axes for engine control: throttle and RPM. Let's be honest, you're not going to fly it higher on daily basis anyway.
              i7 9700K @ stock speed, single GTX1070, 32 gigs of RAM, TH Warthog, MFG Crosswind, Win10.

              Comment


                #8
                Linking the boost and throttle above 10,000ft doesn't surge your MP? I find I have to switch from using throttle to using boost for power when I get above 10,000ft or so, and there is often a wide difference between my throttle position and boost position when doing so.
                YouTube Channel: "Clutch"

                Z390 Aorus Elite | i5-9600k @4.7Ghz | RTX2070 | 32GB DDR4 | Windows 10 | Odyssey Plus | Warthog HOTAS | 20cm Extension

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'm sure it depends on weather conditions and max MP one wants to get. Yesterday on NTTR map , spring weather, about 15 degress OAT at SL, I did a sightseeing flight in D-40, climbing to 30k ft while maintaining max cruise setting of 48" all the time. The turbo RPM only got closer to 22k when I was near 31k ft, so I never had to un-link the levers. I guess I would have to do so If I wanted to push for full power.

                  On the other hand I remember un-likning at lower altitudes when I was trying out D-30 after it was released. But even then it happened not lower than about 25k ft.

                  10k sounds awfully low, I don't say it's wrong, but I'm just surprised and curious. What map and weather conditions combo you use while making your test flights?
                  i7 9700K @ stock speed, single GTX1070, 32 gigs of RAM, TH Warthog, MFG Crosswind, Win10.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Every plane is better with a quadrant, but no, you don't NEED it.

                    You rarely touch the mixture, the RPM doesn't need to be changed that often, 2 buttons will do. Up to 30k feet you can just link the turbo to the throttle and forget about it, so you'll be fine with 1 axis: the throttle.

                    "The Big Show" Spitfire Mk.IX Campaign
                    "Blue Nosed Bastards of Bodney" P-51D Campaign
                    "Jagdflieger" Bf-109K-4 Campaign
                    "Hunters over the Yalu" F-86F Sabre Campaign
                    "Horrido!" FW-190A-8 Campaign

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I use a Warthog and using the left throttle for boost and right for throttle. It works really good and is simple to join them. I don't have to mess with that fiddly switch to join them on the plane.
                      Buzz

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Art-J View Post
                        I'm sure it depends on weather conditions and max MP one wants to get. Yesterday on NTTR map , spring weather, about 15 degress OAT at SL, I did a sightseeing flight in D-40, climbing to 30k ft while maintaining max cruise setting of 48" all the time. The turbo RPM only got closer to 22k when I was near 31k ft, so I never had to un-link the levers. I guess I would have to do so If I wanted to push for full power.

                        On the other hand I remember un-likning at lower altitudes when I was trying out D-30 after it was released. But even then it happened not lower than about 25k ft.

                        10k sounds awfully low, I don't say it's wrong, but I'm just surprised and curious. What map and weather conditions combo you use while making your test flights?
                        Normandy, low 20s, turbo gauge always shooting the needle to around 5 around 8,000~10,000 feet. I can't maintain a stable MP without the boost suddenly kicking in and throwing it up near 50.
                        YouTube Channel: "Clutch"

                        Z390 Aorus Elite | i5-9600k @4.7Ghz | RTX2070 | 32GB DDR4 | Windows 10 | Odyssey Plus | Warthog HOTAS | 20cm Extension

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Ah, got it. We're talking about different issues then. MAP management with turbo on down low is indeed a bit of a PITA, already during takeoff . But after flying P-40 in Il-2GB series I got used to handling a plane without a MAP regulator and DCS Thunderbolt is just more of the same in this particular aspect.

                          Whether one wants to link the levers or not, he will need to keep checking the gauge and moving some lever all the time anyway. That's why I think It's not much of a difference for OP and he should be able to fly the plane even with his current joystick.
                          i7 9700K @ stock speed, single GTX1070, 32 gigs of RAM, TH Warthog, MFG Crosswind, Win10.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by BuzzU View Post
                            I use a Warthog and using the left throttle for boost and right for throttle. It works really good and is simple to join them. I don't have to mess with that fiddly switch to join them on the plane.
                            Yeah same here. L also use the slider for the prop

                            Comment


                              #15
                              It's easy to use PageUp/PageDown for prop pitch and Delete/End for Boost. Also you can flip the latch on the boost lever (align it with the throttle first) and it will follow the throttle, which 90% of the time is what you want it to do. No need to replicate these controls in hardware, you hardly touch them after startup, other than the throttle lever.

                              Comment


                                #16
                                Originally posted by SMH View Post
                                It's easy to use PageUp/PageDown for prop pitch and Delete/End for Boost. Also you can flip the latch on the boost lever (align it with the throttle first) and it will follow the throttle, which 90% of the time is what you want it to do. No need to replicate these controls in hardware, you hardly touch them after startup, other than the throttle lever.
                                A HOTAS is always easier than the keyboard or mouse. The Warthog has enough on it to never having to touch anything in the cockpit when flying.

                                I can't say that about modern fighters but it's easy with WW2 planes.
                                Buzz

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by SMH View Post
                                  It's easy to use PageUp/PageDown for prop pitch and Delete/End for Boost. Also you can flip the latch on the boost lever (align it with the throttle first) and it will follow the throttle, which 90% of the time is what you want it to do. No need to replicate these controls in hardware, you hardly touch them after startup, other than the throttle lever.
                                  really, if you only adjust the throttle after take off you certainly aint getting the most out of your jug. also its best not to interconnect boost and throttle levers, which you shouldnt be doing below 7000ft anyway apart from take off.
                                  Last edited by Brigg; 10-19-2020, 09:38 PM.

                                  Comment


                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Brigg View Post
                                    really, if you only adjust the throttle after take off you certainly aint getting the most out of your jug. also its best not to interconnect boost and throttle levers, which you shouldnt be doing below 7000ft anyway apart from take off.
                                    This is bad information. This is only applicable with low octane training fuel.

                                    Link the boost lever to the throttle and forget it exists until the one time you get above 30K.
                                    475th Fighter Group Discord https://discord.gg/xkKsApD
                                    sigpic

                                    Comment


                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by Brigg View Post
                                      really, if you only adjust the throttle after take off you certainly aint getting the most out of your jug. also its best not to interconnect boost and throttle levers, which you shouldnt be doing below 7000ft anyway apart from take off.
                                      Easier than reality. Where's the fun in that?

                                      Comment


                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by Brigg View Post
                                        really, if you only adjust the throttle after take off you certainly aint getting the most out of your jug. also its best not to interconnect boost and throttle levers, which you shouldnt be doing below 7000ft anyway apart from take off.
                                        Why not?

                                        The only rule about the Boost control is to not put it in advance of the throttle position. (And even if you do that, no ill effects are currently modeled.)
                                        Last edited by SMH; 10-19-2020, 11:02 PM.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X